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Workshop Dust Collection System #2: Adapting to the Machines

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Blog entry by grumpybear7357 posted 11-17-2016 10:53 PM 744 reads 0 times favorited 7 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 1: Workshop Dust Collector Part 2 of Workshop Dust Collection System series Part 3: Adding a DIY Floor Sweep »

Probably the most challenging part of building my little Duct Collection (DC) System was mating the DC pipe or hose to a machine. Anyone who has assembled a DC has probably run into this issue. Most of my equipment was manufactured long before dust collection was cool, so there are no convenient DC ports. I decided DC was still possible, for the most part, by building dust collection chutes mentioned in Part one of this article. This second installment will provide a little more detail on how those were designed and connected to the DC.

Conveniently, my Hitachi miter miter saw has a 2 inch port on the back. Unfortunately to coupling on a 2 inch hose is exactly the same size as the dust port on the miter. The solution I found was a simple 2 inch by 2 inch flexible coupling used for PVC and cast iron Drain pipe. As the photo below shows, it made a perfect adapter. Additionally, the coupling allows for easy removal of the machine from the DC should I need to use the miter at a work site. The DC, through this coupling does a very good job despite not have a back screen behind the miter.

My old Craftsman jointer is a workhorse and it produces volumes of chips during a project. It has no dust collection port, but the jointer is conveniently mounted on a frame that would easily support a dust chute beneath the jointer. I designed and fabricated a simple plywood “V” shaped dust chute to hang by metal clips beneath the jointer. To adapt the dust chute to the DC, a 2 inch port was bored in the side at the bottom of the chute. The port was sized to snuggly fit a 2 inch flexible hose adapter. This configuration worked well, with the DC system able to keep up with the jointer even milling 4 inch wide material.

This is the two sides, front, back, and bottom in the clamps.

This is the assembled chute.

A side view of the dust chute installed beneath the jointer.

The photo below shows the installed dust chute with a 2 inch flexible hose installed in the port.

As mentioned in part one of this article, the DC port on this dust chute was later increased to 3 inch, as I was bringing 3 inch pipe into the same cart to facilitate a new planer.

My old Craftsman Table Saw is a Floor model, having a open bottom base standing on four legs. The bottom edge of the base cabinet has a 1 inch flange that I chose to use to support a dust collection chute again using metal clips as hangers. The dust chute works, however i was not critical enough measuring the opening of the base. There is a small gap completely around the chute and saw dust finds its way through that gap and on to the floor below. As stated in part one of this article, I plan to rebuild this dust chute hoping to make it more effective and more efficient. The design needs to funnel the debris toward the DC port. This chute as also designed with a 2 inch port bored through that snuggly fits a 2 inch flexible hose adapter.

Here is the Dust Chute prior to installation:

And the last two pictures show the installed dust chute:

I use an adjustable hole cutter to cut the ports in the above and also in my blast gates.

Thanks for reading.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. (They hate it when you do that).



7 comments so far

View htl's profile

htl

3058 posts in 973 days


#1 posted 11-18-2016 01:06 AM

grumpybear7357 you got some great projects going on there, so know you like to tinker with your tools.
Your third to last picture shows a sears table saw.
With just a little work and some new angle iron for your fence you could make your saw cut any size lumber you need.
Mine was set up so I could cut 52” no problem.
You may not need it but years ago I was building restaurant cabinets and cut tons a 3/4 plywood so it really came in handy..

-- There's a hundred ways to do anything, alot depends on the tools at hand.

View grumpybear7357's profile

grumpybear7357

25 posts in 459 days


#2 posted 11-18-2016 12:16 PM

htl – that old Sears table saw was given to me this past April. It was clogging a small storage unit and the owner asked me to take it off his hands. It appeared to have been used more for painting than sawing. I cleaned and lubed it, adjusted the fence, and checked the motor bearings for runout. Then I started using it. Prior to this, my table saw was the old ShopSmith. The Sears fence leaves some to be desired and some day I may upgrade to an aftermarket fence. I always measure the front and rear of the blade to the fence – (a habit I learned over the years on the ShopSmith). The saw has three extension tables installed (one on the left, two on the right), and an additional slide out extension on the left – so I can handle fairly wide work as it sits. I do see how the fence track could be replaced with longer angle irons and extend the range of the fence. Good tip.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. (They hate it when you do that).

View English's profile

English

576 posts in 1291 days


#3 posted 11-19-2016 02:12 AM

I like that table saw chute, very simple and quite elegant. Looks like it will work as good has any I have seem.

Thanks for sharing.

-- John, Suffolk Virgina

View grumpybear7357's profile

grumpybear7357

25 posts in 459 days


#4 posted 11-19-2016 01:52 PM

Thanks John, That chute was thrown together pretty quickly. It is effective, however I need a better seal between the edge of the chute and the flange of the saw cabinet.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. (They hate it when you do that).

View htl's profile

htl

3058 posts in 973 days


#5 posted 11-19-2016 02:42 PM

If it doesn’t need to be pretty may I suggest some of that aluminum duck tape for a quick fix .
The tape is really sticky.

-- There's a hundred ways to do anything, alot depends on the tools at hand.

View grumpybear7357's profile

grumpybear7357

25 posts in 459 days


#6 posted 11-19-2016 09:29 PM

htl – I had considered the same tape to seal the chute – I have a roll on hand. One problem I foresee is my shop is not climate controlled and here in middle Georgia the summer temperatures inside the closed shop easily reach 100+ deg. My experience with most tapes has been the adhesives “soften” or “flow” at high temperatures and the tapes release their hold.

My current thinking is to use 3/4 inch foam pipe insulation. Open the insulation and staple it to the inside top edge of the chute. Then install the chute, and use a putty knife to work the loose edge of the foam up and over the saw cabinet flange. I am still cogitating on it.

I could however install the tape now (winter) and see how it holds next summer. Sounds like a pretty good justification for climate control :-)

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. (They hate it when you do that).

View htl's profile

htl

3058 posts in 973 days


#7 posted 11-19-2016 10:30 PM

It’s some pretty sticky tape and the air conditioning guys wouldn’t use it if it came loose, plus on heating duck they get warm and cold a lot up in the attic..
I live in Huntsville so know where you’re coming from.
Just my $.02

-- There's a hundred ways to do anything, alot depends on the tools at hand.

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