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As The Lathe Turns #10: Round Bowl In A Square Block

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Blog entry by William posted 03-06-2013 11:02 PM 1515 reads 0 times favorited 21 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 9: Now THIS Is What I Call Fun Part 10 of As The Lathe Turns series Part 11: A Good Day »

It’s funny to me. I’ve had several larger bowls thrown at me. I’ve had heavy pieces of wet wood drop on me. I’ve hurt my back trying to lift a piece. Then, after all that, today a small piece of dry wood spinning on the lathe brought blood from me for the first time since I started down this road learning to turn.

Don’t worry. It’s nothing serious. It’s just a small nick. I will tell ya’ll more about that later. First, on to today’s adventures.

.



This tool was dropped shipped to me. It was a gift from a friend. I was told that the friend’s friend swore by it and wanted my opinion on it. It is twenty-two inches long. It has a five eighths inch shaft. Set screws in the end allow you to put whatever router bit you want in it to have different profile cutters. It sounded like a good idea, so I said I’d give it a shot.
The tools works, but I wouldn’t buy it myself. I tried it in different applications. I tried presenting it with the carbide edge at different angles to the wood to see how it would act. Here is how I feel about it.
It does a good job on spindle work, but doesn’t work as good as my regular high speed steele tools. It would get the job done, but you’ll have to do more sanding than you would if you just used high speed steele gounges and skew chisels.
For bowls, trying to make sheat cuts with it is asking for a catch. If you very carefully present the edge at just the right angle, it will make shear cuts, but leaves an edge more like you used a dull scraper than a gounge.
It works better if you present the edge like a scraper. However, the finish it leaves is rougher than my high speed steele scrapers, requiring extra sanding or having to go back over it with a sharp high speed steele tool.
I have tried it more on bowls than spindle work. I may have a different opinion after trying it more with spindles. At this time though, I immediately pass over this tool to reach for a high speed steele tool. So, even though I may find uses for it in the future, I don’t think it’s worth the money.

.


I am proud of myself. This may not seem like a big deal to some, but I cut a good recess today to mount onto my four jaw chuck. I’d been having problems with this task. My chuck doesn’t hold well unless you have a square shoulder inside the recess. I was getting catches while trying to do this. I had been trying to do it with a gouge like I’ve seen other people do it. Today, I decided to try and finish up that shoulder with a skew just to see how it worked out. It worked perfectly. I’m learning more and more every day in turning that one shoe does not fit all when it comes to technique. What works for some may not work for others.

.
Now onto my accomplishment of the day.
I actually felt worse today than I did yesterday. I didn’t even feel up to lifting a small piece of log as I done yesterday. I was going to have to figure out something else if I was to accomplish anything at all. I looked around the shop for a bit while waiting on the coffee to brew. I have numerous small blocks of sapelle on a shelf like table in one corner. I thought about more cube in a cubes, but those get boring after doing several. What else could I do with small blocks of wood?
Ya’ll may have noticed that a lot of my ideas are simply versions of other things I see online. Well, this is another one of those versions of something I’ve seen somewhere else. It is dry wood though. So I was able to actually make a finished project today!



This is not actually how I pictured it when I started. By the time I realized it was not working as planned though, I’d already taken too much off the sides and there was no going back. I still think it turned out nice though for someone with my limited experience.
It is made out of a 6×6x2.5 inch block of sapelle. It has two coats of Johnson’s Paste Wax. It isn’t a great finish, but it’s what I had immediately on hand. I enjoyed this project and plan on making more versions of this design. Next time though, I will plan on curving those wings down, as I originally planned, before I get to having too much fun and take away too much material.

.

Now, about the nick on my little finger that brought blood, and it is my lesson of the day.
When turning something like this, remember that just because the lathe is spinning so fast that you can’t see those little square wings hanging out there, they are still there. If you forget that little fact, even for a split second, it will bite you.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/



21 comments so far

View StumpyNubs's profile

StumpyNubs

6259 posts in 1522 days


#1 posted 03-06-2013 11:17 PM

That wound looks like a real gusher! You’d better go get some stitches in that!

Despite your horrific near amputation, your turning looks top notch!

-- It's the best woodworking show since the invention of wood... New episodes at: http://www.stumpynubs.com

View StumpyNubs's profile

StumpyNubs

6259 posts in 1522 days


#2 posted 03-06-2013 11:21 PM

I watched a guy turning a bowl out of a burl once. It still had the bark on the rim as he was sanding the inside with paper. I was just waiting for him to slice an artery with that razor sharp edge. He survived, but it was a really stupid thing to do. I wonder why some people get away with stupid while people like us get injured with safety glasses, ear plugs, push sticks, feather boards and riot shields between us and the danger…

-- It's the best woodworking show since the invention of wood... New episodes at: http://www.stumpynubs.com

View William's profile

William

9217 posts in 1564 days


#3 posted 03-06-2013 11:39 PM

That’s funny Stumpy.
Actually, I’m one of those stupid people you were just talking about.
I learn from my mistakes.
I try to use common sense safety as much as possibly, but on the other hand, I also feel that if we’re not willing to take on the inherit dangers that comes with wood working, and the tools used to do it, then it’s time to pack it up, go home and bake a cake.
The photo of today’s “injury” was meant as a joke leading to the tip of remembering always about those square edged sticking out on a turning like this.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View Bearpie's profile

Bearpie

2591 posts in 1740 days


#4 posted 03-07-2013 12:05 AM

Yes these things happen and goes with the territory, you are lucky you didn’t move a bit further in or you might of had a smashed bone! Also be aware of getting a “jammed” finger when when sanding a bowl, when your fingers holding sandpaper travels into the other side of the rotation causing the change in direction of force thus jamming tour finger. Believe me, it’s painful.

-- Erwin, Jacksonville, FL

View boxcarmarty's profile

boxcarmarty

9719 posts in 1082 days


#5 posted 03-07-2013 12:18 AM

Nice, Oh wait, I used that word on the last blog. Here’s a new word….. Sweet…..

-- My mind is like lighting, one brilliant flash, then its gone.....

View William's profile

William

9217 posts in 1564 days


#6 posted 03-07-2013 12:22 AM

Erwin, I’ve already encountered that change in direction when sanding more times than I’d like to admit. It hasn’t hurt my finger yet, but it does scare the bejeebies out of me when it happens. It seems to snatch my finger to the opposite side of the bowl so quick that you have to think about what caused it.
Actually, I have stopped using sandpaper on the insides of bowls now. After what you described happened often enough, I figure it was just a matter of time before I was injured like that. I am first and foremost a scroller. So I always have 3M Super 77 spray glue around. I’ve started gluing pieces of sandpaper to various wooden strips and such to sand insides of projects.
It seems to be working well. I figure it’s better to be safe than sorry. And when the sandpaper load up, it’s easy to set aside and later tear the old paper off and glue some more on so it’s ready for next time.
Does anyone else do this? Or do most people just use their hands to hold the sandpaper?

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View William's profile

William

9217 posts in 1564 days


#7 posted 03-07-2013 12:23 AM

Thank you Marty.
Can’t wait to see you on Saturday.
When is a good time to call you in the next two days to make sure we have all arrangements set?

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View DIYaholic's profile

DIYaholic

14131 posts in 1397 days


#8 posted 03-07-2013 12:29 AM

I don’t know, that injury looks veeery serious. Ya coulda been seriously mamed or worse, got blood on the work piece!!! To prevent this from ever happening again, I strongly suggest you give up turning and send all turning supplies my way for proper disposal!!!

BTW: Nice little project. I’m looking forward to seeing the next one with curvy wings!!! That’ll be an awesome looking piece!!!

-- Randy-- I may not be good...but I am slow! If good things come to those who wait.... Why is procrastination a bad thing?

View William's profile

William

9217 posts in 1564 days


#9 posted 03-07-2013 12:37 AM

I just got a little close while trimming the bottom of the square wings to smooth them out and forgot how far they hung out there. When the lathe is spinning fast enough, those outer edges of a square piece of thin stock become almost invisible.
And no, you are not getting my tools. As a matter of fact, I’m anxiously awaiting more toys for the lathe that are set to arrive from PSI by Friday.
No I am not addicted Randy. I can stop anytime I get ready. Just watch. I will not turn anything else.

.

Today.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View DIYaholic's profile

DIYaholic

14131 posts in 1397 days


#10 posted 03-07-2013 12:44 AM

Dang, err I mean I was only trying to look out for your health & safety!!!

Looks like I’ll be buying lathe toys, err tools!!!

-- Randy-- I may not be good...but I am slow! If good things come to those who wait.... Why is procrastination a bad thing?

View ShopTinker's profile

ShopTinker

881 posts in 1490 days


#11 posted 03-07-2013 12:51 AM

I like it. It would make a very nice, easy to pass, salsa bowl. I’ve seen a couple of the bowls with curved wings. I think I like this one better.

-- Dan - Valparaiso, Indiana, "A smart man changes his mind, a fool never does."

View William's profile

William

9217 posts in 1564 days


#12 posted 03-07-2013 01:06 AM

Sorry Randy. If I come into some money, I’ll have to send you a tool or two.

Tinker, I like it too, but I’m sure the curved wing design you’re referring to is exactly the idea I was going for. However, I went to far out and lopped off the part of the wing that was supposed to curved downwards. This left me with enough to make square wings, so there it is.
I like the easy to pass idea. What about someone who loves salsa and doesn’t want to pass it around though?

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View JL7's profile

JL7

7407 posts in 1687 days


#13 posted 03-07-2013 01:27 AM

That turned out nice…...there is something cool about the winged bowls…..glad to hear the injury was minor…..

Lot’s of learning….

-- Jeff - I have not failed. I've just found 10,002 ways that won't work.

View grizzman's profile

grizzman

7150 posts in 2025 days


#14 posted 03-07-2013 01:38 AM

im really glad to see you progress in your learning to turn adventure..and to see this very nice turning is a good sight to behold…i know you will continue to do well…looking forward to the tale of blood and horror..lol…

-- GRIZZMAN ...[''''']

View William's profile

William

9217 posts in 1564 days


#15 posted 03-07-2013 01:46 AM

Thanks Jeff and Grizz.
I like the winged bowls too. It is just something about a round figure formed into the middle of a square of wood. It looks so wrong that it’s right.
Grizz, blood doesn’t bother me. These days if I bump something hard my skin breaks and bleeds. However, we don’t need horror in the wood shop.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

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