LumberJocks

As The Lathe Turns #7: The Bent Shaft Lathe

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by William posted 02-24-2013 01:25 AM 2051 reads 0 times favorited 18 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 6: Lessons Learned In Bowl Turning Part 7 of As The Lathe Turns series Part 8: Close Only Counts With.............. »

You may remember, my recent adventures into wood turning almost ended before it even got started good due to the bent shaft on an old lathe. In that corner, there sits three lathes now, a Ridgid, the big heavy flat bed lathe, and the bent shaft lathe. Every time I looked over at the bent shaft lathe, I’ve considered what to do with it. It sits on a heavy old bar and was just taking up space. While I do have a very large shop, I still don’t like wasted space. I need to figure out what to do with it pretty soon before it bugged me to death.
So, I was looking into several books and catalogues at wood turning equipment. Some of the looking I must admit is only wishful thinking because of lack of funds. Something I seen though that peaked my interest was a buffing station that is sold to be mounted between centers on a lathe. I thought about this and realized that the bent shaft, and the resulting off balance turning, would not effect how a buffing pad works. However, the problem was still, I couldn’t afford it. If any of you have seen much of my past work though, you know lack of funds doesn’t usually stop me.
To start with, I see everything these days as an opportunity to turn something on the lathe, so I got started.

On the headstock end, I just turned a cone that would seat itself into the morse taper. The other side of the cone I drilled a hole on center slightly smaller than the three eighths all thread and force threaded the rod into the cone.

For the other end of the all thread, I turned a bushing with a force threaded hole on one side, just like on the head stock end, and on the other side I installed a bearing. The old tail stock spindle was grinded down to a cone to snugly fit inside the wooden bushing.
At first, I scratched me head on how to get the hole for the bearing on the bushing. In the past, for through hole, I have drilled undersized holes for things such as this and used a spindle sander to slowly open it up for a press fit. This couldn’t be done here though because I needed a blind hole that would not allow the bearing to press all the way through when I put pressure on it from the tail stock. Then it hit me, turn the hole on the lathe. That’s what I done too. As I said earlier, I see so much these days as an opportunity to turn wood. I got a better press fit by turning this on the lathe than I ever could using any method I’ve tried in the past.

Towards the middle of the all thread, I used a brass sleeve bushing as extra support. I don’t know if I really needed this middle support or not, because I did not test it without it. I did know though that it wouldn’t hurt it.
It is simply a brass sleeve bushing, sandwiched between holes in three pieces of wood, and mounted on the old tool rest base.

So here is my new buffing station. On the far left is a sanding disk. I took an old spindle sander that originally mounted on a drill chuck and made that. I haven’t used those sanding disks since I purchased a dedicated spindle sander. So it needed a new home anyway. Next is a piece of wood I turned with different profile. I will load this up with emory paste. I intent to use it to touch turning tools on while turning. This ought to help me extend the life of the edge of my tools and keep me from going back to the grinder with them quite so often. Then, on the right side of the center support, I have buffing pads from course to fine.

While doing all this, I decided to just turn that whole bar into a work station to sharpen tools. The buffing station is on top. The grinder is right below it. I also now have a dedicated sharpening jig system on the grinder. I will probably blog about that one at a later date. Also, I built a new lathe tool holder. This is identical to the old one on the left side of the table. At this time it has my new bowl gouges in it, and I am currently awaiting some scrapers from Penn State Industries that will find a new home here as well.
Behind all this, on the bar top surface, I drilled various holes to hold my chucks, faceplate, knockout tools, and so forth. I have plenty of room there to add more holes for more accessories as I’m able to get them.

I completed all this and admired my work, but was unhappy. I wanted to turn something. My back was hurting though, and my boys weren’t presently there to help me lift any wood to get a bowl blank. I remembered a turning exercise I had done a long time ago though and remembered it was fun to do. I thought I could do a better job of it this time since my turning skills are steadily improving.


These captured ring things are fun to turn. I don’t think there is a right or wrong way to do them. They actually sell dedicated tools for making these. I just use a gouge, skew chisel, and parting tool to make them though.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/



18 comments so far

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

11493 posts in 1436 days


#1 posted 02-24-2013 02:36 AM

That buffing station is ingenious! I knew that bent shaft lathe was driving you nuts (as it would me). You turned a broken tool into a totally useful item. Great work! I’ve never thought of putting emory paste on a wood substrate. Let us know how that works out.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View William's profile

William

9266 posts in 1588 days


#2 posted 02-24-2013 03:26 AM

Thanks Andy.
I don’t know how the wood suface will work out. I did have reason for considering it though. I’ve seen slips for chisels in several catalogues. They are just shaped pieces of wood that you put paste on. Therefore, I thought it would work in this instance as well. I will be sure to let ya’ll know though how it works out.
HERE is an example of what I’m talking about. It’s called the flexcut slipstrop. It is nothing more than a piece of shaped wood that you put paste on to use as a strop.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View Sandra's profile

Sandra

4984 posts in 821 days


#3 posted 02-24-2013 03:30 AM

Very ingenious! Now I’ll have to go look at your shop pictures.

-- No, I don't want to buy the pink hammer.

View William's profile

William

9266 posts in 1588 days


#4 posted 02-24-2013 03:45 AM

I can’t remember how much I still have here on Lumberjocks, but I have a blog. The address to it is below all my posts. On my blog is every project I’ve made since back around 2009.
Also, here is a neat video a friend of mine recorded and posted on YouTube of my shop.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View Bearpie's profile

Bearpie

2592 posts in 1764 days


#5 posted 02-24-2013 03:49 AM

The support is very necessary on a thin rod if you are going to put any kind of pressure on it to help the buffing/polishing process. Good use of a “defective” lathe.

-- Erwin, Jacksonville, FL

View William's profile

William

9266 posts in 1588 days


#6 posted 02-24-2013 03:55 AM

Thanks Bearpie. I figured anything was better than it just sitting there in the way, useless.
Also, the kit I bought with all the buffing wheels in it (actually, it’s two different kits) had three smaller wheels on shafts that you can mount in a drill. I kept these aside so I’d be able to get down into anything I can’t do on this buffing station.
As for the center support, I wasn’t sure, but like I said, I was sure it wouldn’t hurt. The thin rod giving was my line of thinking though. It’s only a three eighths rod. I thought about using a thicker rod, but a thicker rod would have been harder to get through the center of the buffing wheels.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

11493 posts in 1436 days


#7 posted 02-24-2013 04:27 AM

William, If the wood doesn’t hold the emory well enough try one of those paper/cardboard wheels the knife guys use. They work great for honing an edge with buffing compounds.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View William's profile

William

9266 posts in 1588 days


#8 posted 02-24-2013 04:38 AM

Thanks Andy. I think the wood will work, but if not, I will be looking for a plan B. I’ll keep your idea in mind.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View DIYaholic's profile (online now)

DIYaholic

14519 posts in 1420 days


#9 posted 02-24-2013 05:15 AM

Plan “B” could be MDF. There are many a strop made of MDF.

I don’t want to swell your already huge head by saying “ingenious”, but….

-- Randy-- I may not be good...but I am slow! If good things come to those who wait.... Why is procrastination a bad thing?

View JL7's profile

JL7

7473 posts in 1711 days


#10 posted 02-24-2013 06:22 AM

Very good use of an otherwise useless tool! You will fall in love with the buffing rig…....I have the beall buffing thing and it kicks butt…...for sure one of my favorite finishing tricks…...well done.

-- Jeff - I have not failed. I've just found 10,002 ways that won't work.

View stefang's profile

stefang

13623 posts in 2080 days


#11 posted 02-24-2013 10:59 AM

You have a lot of great ideas William and the initiative and creativeness to actually build them too. MDF makes a pretty good sharpening wheel, probably better than wood.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View eddie's profile

eddie

7531 posts in 1359 days


#12 posted 02-24-2013 12:12 PM

very cleaver William

-- Jesus Is Alright with me

View flintbone's profile

flintbone

184 posts in 1902 days


#13 posted 02-24-2013 01:40 PM

Good job William. Another idea is to glue a piece of leather on your bushing.
With a little compound on it you will have another great power strop option.
Keep up the good work.
flint

-- If I had only known, I would have been a locksmith. - Albert Einstein

View William's profile

William

9266 posts in 1588 days


#14 posted 02-24-2013 01:59 PM

Thank you all. I know now that MDF is the way to go if I don’t like how the wood performs.

Flint, I’d actually thought about leather since a leather strop is what I use on my bench chisels. I searched and couldn’t find the piece of leather I have somewhere. I put it somewhere where I’d know where it is. Now I don’t know where it is.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View Bearpie's profile

Bearpie

2592 posts in 1764 days


#15 posted 02-25-2013 06:12 AM

Is it holding up your pants??

-- Erwin, Jacksonville, FL

showing 1 through 15 of 18 comments

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase