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Tools #6: It Never Ends

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Blog entry by William posted 450 days ago 1359 reads 0 times favorited 11 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 5: New Addition To The Band Saw Lineup Part 6 of Tools series no next part

It never does end, does it? I’m talking about shop maintenance. Whether it be moving tools, fixing tools, repurposing tools, sharpening tools, or whatever, it never ends.
With that thought, I thought I’d share a few things I’ve been working on recently.

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Some time ago I built a box joint machine that was designed by Stumpy Nubs. If you didn’t see it, that post can be seen here. Anyway, I have used that machine a lot since then. I mean, if you keep up with any of my projects, you know there has been a LOT of fingers cut with that machine.
Well, I have had a problem with the machine the last few times I’ve used it. It has a quick release mechanism on it that is accomplished with the use of a connecting bolt that was cut in half. This left only half the threads of it in contact with the treaded rod that runs through the machine. It seems the more I used it, the looser it has gotten. It needed some tightening somehow.
Well, I gave this some thought. I realized that I never used the quick release function anyway. It just seemed easy enough to me to crank it back. Mostly this is because I usually have it cranked all the way back before I remember that it has a quick release machanism. So my thought was to remove the half bolt and replace it with a complete bolt. This would eliminate the possibility of it skipping teeth, which it has done recently and cause me to mess up a couple of joints.
Upon attempting to disassembly the machine though, I ran into more problem. It wouldn’t come apart. I used screws and Gorilla Wood Glue when I built it. There is this one thing about Gorilla Wood glue. It is good. It is good enough that wood won’t come apart, even when you want it to.
So, instead, I decided on a more jury rigged fix. I unthreaded the rod on the far right end of the machine, threaded the new connecting nut about midways of the rod. Then I raised the old half nut of the quick release and set it down on top of the new nut. I placed an old leather tool belt under all this to help prevent a fire, and welded the half nut on top of the new nut.

I could have done this at any time. Today though, I was trying to cut some box joints for a friend of mine. It was in some very large panels compared to what I normally do on this. It also was in some plywood that I knew would be costly to replace. So I decded to go ahead and do this before cutting those joints so I could rest assured there wouldn’t be any mishaps.



The repair worked nicely. I only caught the underside of the sliding carriage on fire. It was only a small fire and was put out easily. As you can see though, the machine now cuts joints that are as tight as when I first built it.

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Next up is my ongoing band saw adventure.

Here are my two 16” shop built band saws. The one closest to the camera is the one I keep a thin blade on and do curved cuts on. The one in the distance keeps a resaw blade it and is used strictly for resawing.
That left me with the Craftsman 12”. I was going to give this saw to a friend of mine. I reconsidered though because of an idea I had. First of all, this saw was never a good saw anyway and I was scared I’d only be pawning my frustration with this saw off on my friend. Also, I had an idea. This is an idea that I’ve actually drawn out on paper, so it is going to be a doozy. I plan on turning this into a planer blade sharpener for my electric planer knives. I’ll also use it as a strip sander as well. Before you think I’m completely crazy, this saw says on the side of it Band Saw/Sander. Sears, for years, sold the 1/2×80” belts for it. They can still be bought from other sources now. So it works as a sander.
I had everything I needed to turn it into a sander except for the metal platen that goes behind the belt. That part, unfortunately, is now unavailable. That would be a problem, except I’m a wood worker. I said to myself, “self, if you can build a bandsaw out of wood, you can surely make this little part”.

I moved the saw to a table that was already in the rear of the shop where I wanted the saw to be at. Then I made a wooden platen for it based on photos I found online of the part.

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Next up, I decided I wanted to turn a bowl. I recently turned a bowl for my second marble machine. Ever since, I have been wanting to play around with turning bowls. I ran into some problems there though. You can read about the issues I had here if you’d like. For you master wood turners out there, I would really appreciate you going to that link and coming back here to give me your advice. I’m a complete noob at bowl turning and could use all the help I can get.
For those that don’t care for reading about the problems I had, or just know as little as I do about turning bowls, I will end this post with a couple of photos of the bowl I turned, even through the problems. I know this bowl isn’t much, but I think it’s pretty nice for a newbie bowl turner.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/



11 comments so far

View grizzman's profile

grizzman

6465 posts in 1805 days


#1 posted 450 days ago

looks good enough for my sugar frosted flakes, or my oatmeal….....or some chile with some red hot hot sauce, yep its a terrible looking bow, just awful…you better send it to me and i will dispose of it to its proper place ;).......good read here…..great idea with the extra bandsaw…..your one heck of a guy william…i doubt there isnt much you cant fix…...keep at it buddy….grizz

-- GRIZZMAN ...[''''']

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

9545 posts in 1191 days


#2 posted 450 days ago

William- You are an inspiration! Those bandsaws and the box joint machine are major accomplishments. I couldn’t even begin to build those. You are one of the most talented guys on this entire site and I’m proud to call you my friend. Keep up the inspiring work! EDIT: I knew you would be all over that amazing marble machine posted earlier today!

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View William's profile (online now)

William

8517 posts in 1344 days


#3 posted 450 days ago

Thanks Grizz. Let me get a little better at the bowl turning, and I promise you I am going to send you a bowl just because of that comment. Well, I like you too, but don’t go around telling people that. Send me a PM with an address so I can make the post carrier show up with something one day.

Gfadvm, thank you. I don’t see it as a big deal, but it does make me feel good that others can find my work enjoyable.
As for that marble machine, I have trouble even calling it that. That is a work of art. I want to buy the plans for that when he gets them available. That’s one that I’ll probably never build, but I enjoy studying the inner workings of things like that.
I miss a lot on this site because there are so many amazing projects posted at all hours of the day and night. I am glad I didn’t miss that one though. That thing is amazing.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View Bearpie's profile

Bearpie

2576 posts in 1519 days


#4 posted 450 days ago

William, one thing I noticed on your bowl is the “rings” on the inside. That mean you are not sanding enough or using too coarse a grit for the final sanding. I generally start sanding with 120, 220, 320, 600, 800 then a light touch with a rubber backed 1500 grit. If I see any lines or places that shows up as “white” sand some more. I like to use a 2 inch Velcro backed sanding pad on my drill to eliminate those lines. By using the drill in increasingly finer grits, you will also eliminate the swirl marks! They are so fine once you get up to 600 and are invisible to the naked eyes. I go higher cause I’m picky and so is my wife. She can feel rough spots I can’t feel with my big coarse hands, she has tiny dainty hands.

Do not use the rubber mounted pads to turn with. They are generally used when you finish the bowl and then mount the rims to it with the rubber grips to prevent marring the surface and gently clean up the bottom foot where the chuck was gripping. Then sand it smooth and finish with whatever you use.

-- Erwin, Jacksonville, FL

View Bearpie's profile

Bearpie

2576 posts in 1519 days


#5 posted 450 days ago

Oh, yes another thing, sharpen your turning chisels often. Going 2-3 hours on soft wood might be ok but not on hard woods. If it feels like you have to “push” it’s time to sharpen. Just a light touch to clean the edges and to leave a fresh burr is all you need to do. Not necessary to grind 1/16” off. There are times I touch up several times an hour.

-- Erwin, Jacksonville, FL

View DIYaholic's profile

DIYaholic

11240 posts in 1176 days


#6 posted 450 days ago

Great blog entry!!! A very enjoyable and entertaining read.

Ya got a picture of the bandsaw, but not of the “platten”, or did I miss that?!? Or maybe a close up???

I’m thinking a Maple/Walnut sundae would be a good compliment to that bowl do-hickey-thing-a-ma-jig you turned. Nicely done BTW!!!

Keep building, repurposing, blogging and most importantly….
Keep being you!!!

-- Randy-- I may not be good...but I am slow! If good things come to those who wait.... Why is procratination a bad thing?

View William's profile (online now)

William

8517 posts in 1344 days


#7 posted 450 days ago

Thanks for the advice Bearpie.
I will put all that to good use.
So the rubber feet one is not for turning at all, but finishing?

Randy, I did not do a closeup of the platen, but I will be sure to get you one as soon as I get the right belts on it. I only have the half inch belts right now. I have some one inch wide ones on the way from Carter. right now, the platen looks weird because is it an inch wide with only the half inch belts on it.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View boxcarmarty's profile

boxcarmarty

8216 posts in 861 days


#8 posted 450 days ago

William, Is that considered warranty work on the box joint machine???

Ya got a picture of the bandsaw, but not of the “platten”, or did I miss that?!? Or maybe a close up???

-- My mind is like lighting, one brilliant flash, then its gone.....

View William's profile (online now)

William

8517 posts in 1344 days


#9 posted 449 days ago

I did not do a close up of the platen Marty.
See the post before yours.
I will try to get one soon.
I forgot it today.
It turned out to be a bad day for me.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View Roger's profile

Roger

13062 posts in 1305 days


#10 posted 447 days ago

William, you are a gr8 engineer, and a very ibig nspiration to myself, and, I’m sure everyone else. Keep on keepin on. We’ll keep watching.

-- Roger from KY. Work/Play/Travel Safe. Kentuk55@bellsouth.net

View William's profile (online now)

William

8517 posts in 1344 days


#11 posted 446 days ago

Thanks Roger.
I think my engineering abilities come from necessity. You do what you have to do.

I was talking to a friend the other day about this very thing. I admit I do have experience in problem solving mechanical things and such. I worked for a number of years in a plant as an industrial mechanic back in the 90s. In this plant, the newest machinery there had not been produced since the 1940s. Replacement parts were a joke. The engineer they hired to oversee us was a joke as well. He and I commonly got into arguments because he’s tell me what “the book” said about this or that. I’d explain to him as nicely as I could, when you’re working with sixty year old equipment with no access to replacement parts, you can take that book and shove it up your…....
We had to solve problems there however we could. Teeth on a bull gear (gear that was six feet tall and two feet thick) wore out, you took a week of sixteen hour days and built those teeth back up with a welder. A gasket blew? You got an old inner tube or thin cardboard and made a gasket.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

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