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Radio Table #1: Skirts, Legs, and Something aint right.

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Blog entry by William posted 646 days ago 1395 reads 0 times favorited 21 comments Add to Favorites Watch
no previous part Part 1 of Radio Table series Part 2: Waming Up Now »

My mom said she wanted a table for a radio she bought. She gave me the measurements, the hieght she wanted, and told me to just go from there and build her something. So I have been thinking for a little while now about how I want to build it. For loved ones, I usually like doing something different. How do you do a table different though?
Well, following, I came up with an idea for a different table. Now, I don’t claim this is completely original. I am sure somewhere, someone, has built one just like it. I think it is a different way than normal for constructing a table though. So let’s go.

I started with the skirts. I wanted something different than what I usually see. I considered my options and decided to use my finger joint mahcine for the joints.

Then I glued them up. This gives me two square skirts for a table top and a shelf underneath.



Then I used a dado set on the table saw to cut the proper amount from two side of each leg, at the top and in the middle of each leg.


These two photos show how those notches on the legs fit with the skirts.


Then I started fitting the legs to the skirts. I carefully glued the legs in place in each corner. Also, there will be stretchers glued on the inside of each skirt apron. These will serve as an added means for keeping the legs squarely in place. Also, the surface of the top and shelf will go on top of the stretcher. They will be inset, because my Mom wants a lip all the way around both surfaces.

As I started gluing things up, things started to go south quickly. I am using my favorite glue, Gorilla Wood Glue. I use this glue a lot and, usually, after it had set for less than an hour, there is no breaking the joint. I have tested this glue even on common butt joints and it’s always strong. However, as I started assembly of this today, even the slightest pressure and the joints would fail miserably. I could hear them when they popped loose.
I decided to take a coffee break and ponder this for a moment.
By the time I started gluing today, it was cool enough in my shop that I had on a long sleeve shirt. It was not cool enough though for me to need a fire. I think the temperature may have been just cool enough to effect the glues performance. This is the only explanation I can think of at this point.
So, at this point I’m not sure what I’m going to do. Next time in the shop, I will try to disassemble what I have done so far enough without damaging anything. If I can do that, I will make sure to have a nice toasty fire in the wood heater before going any further.
If I can’t disassemble it enough, then it looks like I made some pretty fancy firewood. If that happens, it won’t be the first time, and I’m sure it won’t be the last.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/



21 comments so far

View Dave's profile

Dave

11149 posts in 1466 days


#1 posted 646 days ago

That has to be the most different box joint setup I have ever seen. Nice work and it looks to be like a great project in the works.
I like exposed joinery.

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

View DIYaholic's profile

DIYaholic

13268 posts in 1301 days


#2 posted 646 days ago

I think the glue up went south for a reason…...
Warmer weather!!!! Lol.

You may be right about the shop temerature affecting the glue up. Sorry it went amiss! You may want to bring the glue into the (heated) house, the night before the next glue up attempt. That will keep the glue warm & ready to go. Just a thought.

Glue up aside, the table is looking good. Looking forward to more progress posts and the finished project.

-- Randy-- I may not be good...but I am slow! If good things come to those who wait.... Why is procratination a bad thing?

View Bagtown's profile

Bagtown

1699 posts in 2356 days


#3 posted 646 days ago

I do love box joints.
Looking good William.

-- Mike - In Fort McMurray Alberta

View eddie's profile

eddie

7202 posts in 1240 days


#4 posted 646 days ago

William when you figure it out thats going to be a really nice table,and i know you will, did you use that tool you made from stumpys plans for those joints .i have the plans but havent made it yet and may borrow it for a table i got in mind , that part really sets it off nicely

-- Jesus Is Alright with me

View patron's profile

patron

13001 posts in 1967 days


#5 posted 646 days ago

i know you will get it right william

just another bump along the way

mom will be so proud

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View William's profile

William

8973 posts in 1468 days


#6 posted 646 days ago

Thanks ya’ll.
I keep the glue in the house during the winter. So the glue is good. I think maybe the temperature was too cool in the shop for the glue to cure properly.

Yes, Eddie, that was done with the Stumpy box joint machine. I use it every chance I get. It makes very accurate joints.

By the way, the finger joints I used here are quarter inch. On the stumpy box joint machine though, it is easy to make them any size you wish simply by remembering that every turn of the crank moves the carriage over exactly one eight if an inch. Mutiply that to the spacing you need, and go to work.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View grizzman's profile

grizzman

6917 posts in 1929 days


#7 posted 646 days ago

wow buddy, these are something else, i only read part way and had to stop to comment, but you did a great job on the design and these will surly be your moms delight, as to the bump that David is talking about i will have to go back and read, but whatever it is, you will smooth it out…great job here, you never disappoint William, im always so proud of your work…

-- GRIZZMAN ...[''''']

View HamS's profile

HamS

1168 posts in 1015 days


#8 posted 646 days ago

Looks great. When I have temp issues in the shop, I go to polyurethane glues which seem to be much better at tolerating wider temp ranges. I have the same problem in my shop. I also find that if I have a glue up I need to leave it in the warm part of the shop for at least six hours with yellow glue. The fire keeps things warm for three without recharging.

-- My mother named me Hamilton, I have been trying to earn my nickname ever since.

View grizzman's profile

grizzman

6917 posts in 1929 days


#9 posted 646 days ago

ok, now i know the problem, yea could be the temp, as a way to fix it, if you cant get them apart and re glue, how about screwing them , it looks like you have enough room on each leg and you could cover them with a contrasting wood for the plugs and make it look like its a part of the design, i would hate to see these become fire wood…good luck buddy..ill look for your next post to see how things came out…

-- GRIZZMAN ...[''''']

View William's profile

William

8973 posts in 1468 days


#10 posted 646 days ago

Thanks guys.
I’m pretty sure I can fix this easily. I just decided to stop for the evening.
I’ll bet you guys know about this one. After I realized there was a problem, combined with it getting late in the day, I sort of got disgusted and just didn’t want to mess with it anymore today.

There’s always another day.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View grizzman's profile

grizzman

6917 posts in 1929 days


#11 posted 646 days ago

yea, its the great thing about the shop, you can just walk away, close the door and come back to it with a fresh mind and new energy..it will be just fine…

-- GRIZZMAN ...[''''']

View patron's profile

patron

13001 posts in 1967 days


#12 posted 646 days ago

worst case scenario

you could put some blocks behind the skirts
and screw/glue them there into both skirt and legs

that way no plugs to look at
and they will be hidden too

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View grizzman's profile

grizzman

6917 posts in 1929 days


#13 posted 646 days ago

oh yea david , do it that way…dis my idea all together….......fine…do it so you dont see the screws…fine…lol..good idea…hey william, yea, what david says…....gee, you always know the right way…lol…i guess those gray hairs have something behind them…...keep it up…maybe your own web site soon david..ill sign up…...

-- GRIZZMAN ...[''''']

View patron's profile

patron

13001 posts in 1967 days


#14 posted 646 days ago

hair still brown grizz
just some accents at the edges
(but there is allot of air
inside my head)

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View William's profile

William

8973 posts in 1468 days


#15 posted 646 days ago

I thought of that, well, something similar to that actually.
Before leaving the shop, I chopped some temporary stretchers and clamped on there so I knew the legs would at least stay put tight in the corners where they go. I’m thinking that if I get back to it and the glue won’t come apart without damage, and if I can see that it won’t before doing any damage, there was still hope.
My thought are this, and it’s similar to your screw idea.

I could use a syringe to inject glue behind the legs. These are attache to the skirts at opposing side, so glue there would hold the legs in place and also hold the skirts together at the finger joints. Then I could take my 23ga. pin nailer and shoot one inch pins through the legs into both skirts at all the corners. Like your screw idea, this will keep everything together and not be seen by anyone not absolutely looking for it.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

showing 1 through 15 of 21 comments

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