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Tools #5: New Addition To The Band Saw Lineup

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Blog entry by William posted 11-10-2012 01:40 AM 3684 reads 0 times favorited 31 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 4: Another Oldie But Goodie Part 5 of Tools series Part 6: It Never Ends »

Some of you may remember that late last year, and into early this year, I built a band saw. Since then, I have really put it through it’s paces. That thing is a beast and has taken anything I have thrown at it without so much as a grumble. In addition to that, it has proved to be more precise than the several factory made band saws I have owned.



Now, the thing is, I built this saw in conjunction with a good friend of mine. Most of the work was done at my shop. My friend took his back to his shop back around the time I completed mine. I have been considering building another one of these.

Since getting used to a larger and better saw, I have been extremely dissatisfied with the performance of my old Craftsman saw. It is a good saw for general work, but mostly I have been unhappy with the lack of precision. I use this saw mainly for curved cuts, since I do all my re sawing on my shop made saw now. I always cut outside the line though and sand up to it, simply because I don’t trust the precision of it.



So, when I mentioned this to my friend, he offered to bring the saw back to me. For various reasons, he has decided that any large work that he can’t do with what he has, he’ll just bring to my shop. I jumped at the chance to get this saw back to my shop. Since I know it is built identical to the other shop built saw I’ve been using for a long time, I know it is a great saw.
The first thing I had to do was build a stand for it. I made the stand you see in the first photo of this saw. It is just a simple square cabinet with three drawers. There’s nothing really special about it. I made it quickly out of cottonwood.


Next I added a guard to it. I decided to do this one a little different than the other saw. On the other saw, I wanted overly safe guards. Because of my sometimes re sawing long or large wood, I sometimes need help on that saw, which is usually one of my sons.
On this saw, I will be using it for curved cuts and I’ll be able to manage everything on it by myself. Therefore, I wasn’t quite as careful with the guards. For this one, I wanted something simple that protects the operator, while still allowing easy blade changes. This is because, depending on what I’m cuttings, I’ll be using more than one blade on this one, unlike the other saw that keeps a half inch re saw blade on it at all times.

So, I made this guard a hinged model with latches on the front to hold it closed when using the saw. This makes for easy blade changes. The saw is ready to use now. I just have to get a smaller blade. For the time being, it has the same half inch blade as the other saw.
As soon as I get the smaller blade, so I’ll have a saw to cut curves, and as soon as a different friend can make it to Vicksburg, I’ve found a new home for the old Craftsman. I hope my friend gets as many miles out of it as I have. Maybe one day I’ll be able to talk him into letting me help him build a shop built saw as well.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/



31 comments so far

View patron's profile

patron

13034 posts in 1999 days


#1 posted 11-10-2012 01:50 AM

what a great deal william

and here you were
just talking about making another one

move to the head of the line bud

you earned it

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View Dave's profile

Dave

11168 posts in 1498 days


#2 posted 11-10-2012 01:50 AM

Now that is a great saw you have there William. I am sure it will serve you well. I have ran these saws and was very impressed at how smooth and balanced they are. Nice job on the housing.

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

View JL7's profile

JL7

7206 posts in 1623 days


#3 posted 11-10-2012 01:51 AM

And then there were 2. How cool is that! You may need to build a sawmill next…... Look out WOOD!

-- Jeff - I have not failed. I've just found 10,002 ways that won't work.

View William's profile

William

9046 posts in 1500 days


#4 posted 11-10-2012 01:54 AM

Thank you all.

Jeff, I have considered building one of these horizontally on runners with up and down movement via all thread and using it as a small sawmill.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View DIYaholic's profile

DIYaholic

13581 posts in 1333 days


#5 posted 11-10-2012 01:56 AM

That is truely the BEST of both worlds. A resaw & a curve cutting saw. Good for you!!!

I’m about to pull the trigger on a bandsaw, more than likely it will be the Rikon 10-325, a 14” with 13” resaw capacity and a 1-1/2HP motor. Once my shop is better organized, I WILL build me a “Shop Made BS”. Hearing you rave about yours, gives me the desire to try.

-- Randy-- I may not be good...but I am slow! If good things come to those who wait.... Why is procratination a bad thing?

View DIYaholic's profile

DIYaholic

13581 posts in 1333 days


#6 posted 11-10-2012 01:58 AM

I love the idea of a sawmill build. If you don’t, I will someday, maybe…...

-- Randy-- I may not be good...but I am slow! If good things come to those who wait.... Why is procratination a bad thing?

View William's profile

William

9046 posts in 1500 days


#7 posted 11-10-2012 02:02 AM

If you go to this site, where the plans for the bandsaw I built is from, he has plans for a sawmill. If I remember correctly though, he uses his 14” saw for it.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View William's profile

William

9046 posts in 1500 days


#8 posted 11-10-2012 02:03 AM

It was the 14” he used.
Here the article on his band saw sawmill build.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View JL7's profile

JL7

7206 posts in 1623 days


#9 posted 11-10-2012 02:17 AM

Excellent – sounds like the sawmill wheels are turning already….....

-- Jeff - I have not failed. I've just found 10,002 ways that won't work.

View William's profile

William

9046 posts in 1500 days


#10 posted 11-10-2012 02:37 AM

You must not have figured out yet Jeff, my wheels are always tunring on something. The problem is, it’s usually tunring in about five or six different directions. If I could force myself to focus on one thing at a time, I could come up with some stuff out of this world.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View luv2learn's profile

luv2learn

1707 posts in 961 days


#11 posted 11-10-2012 02:37 AM

William, what great fortune to have two of these Matthais Wandel creations in your shop. I concur with your assessment of these saws. I too built one and it performs wonderfully. In fact, I am thinking about building the sawmill he designed. It just goes to show that you don’t always have to spend a ton of money to get quality.

-- Lee - Northern idaho~"If the women don't find you handsome, at least they ought to find you handy"~ Red Green

View William's profile

William

9046 posts in 1500 days


#12 posted 11-10-2012 02:49 AM

No you don’t Luv2Learn.
Since I don’t count the wood that I already had on hand, I have about $100 in the saw I’ve been using for resawing. That’s with a 1 1/2HP variable speed motor. To get a comparable factory made saw, I’d surely spend well in excess of a $1000, easy.

I was just looking earlier at his sawmill design.
It has definately caught my interest.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View Jamie Speirs's profile

Jamie Speirs

4142 posts in 1515 days


#13 posted 11-10-2012 04:16 AM

William that is some saw

The frame looks very strong and I

would imagine very quiet?

Jamie

-- Who is the happiest of men? He who values the merits of others, and in their pleasure takes joy, even as though 'twere his own. --Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

View William's profile

William

9046 posts in 1500 days


#14 posted 11-10-2012 04:24 AM

Jamie, it runs quieter than the Craftsman.
The frame is strong. Matthius Wandell, the man who designed the saw done a measurement with his design versus a factory made metal frame saw. The wooden framed saw is actually has a stronger beam strength than the average same sized metal frame saw.
This sounds crazy, but you have to consider the facts of the matter. Even though factory made saws are made of a stronger material, metal, it is usually thin and hollow. Meanwhile, the frame on these wooden saws are close to five inches thick, square, and solid.
Also, the construction of the saw uses notched pieces in a way that each piece helps reinforce all the other pieces. It makes for an extremely sturdy saw.

For added proof, an accident happened while I was building my saw. At one point, I was moving the frame, as I had already done several time. With the top wheel in place though, which it had not been before this point, it was more top heavy than I thought. When I turned around, the saw frame hit the concrete floor of my shop from a height of over three feet. It hit with a thud. It was solid and it done no damage whatsoever to the frame. Although this accident was unintentional, I’m actually glad it happen. It took away any worries I might have had about how solid the frame was.

Oh, one drawback the the frame is, it is HEAVY. Both the frames on these saws are made of red oak.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View eddie's profile

eddie

7326 posts in 1272 days


#15 posted 11-10-2012 05:54 AM

William that a great job on the saw ,but then i know you and how you work on projects but am still amazed at it .

-- Jesus Is Alright with me

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