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Shop Made Scroll Saw - Part 3

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Blog entry by William posted 832 days ago 9067 reads 4 times favorited 21 comments Add to Favorites Watch

If any of you haven’t seen the rest of this build, here is Part 1 and Part 2.

Here, I have cut and am test fitting the table. Luckily one of my older sons was home today. He didn’t work because of the rain. If it wasn’t for him, the table wouldn’t have gotten done today. There was quite a bit of digging to find a piece of pecan large enough for the table. That is one of the features I love about this design. It has a massive table. It is eighteen inches wide and thirty five inches long.
I don’t know if I have mentioned this yet, but there is another advantage to this saw as well. The largest scroll saw I have presently is sixteen inches. The throat depth on this one is going to be twenty five inches. That’s a full nine inches over the best saws I’ve had in the past.

While test fitting the table, I found the only thing so far that I do not like about the design in the magazine. According to the magazine article, the rear of the table is supposed to simply have screws placed sideways into the frame. For a table this large, I feel that this would not possibly be adequate support for it.
So, I cut a block of wood for each side, sanded it to match the profile of the surrounding areas, and drilled two inch holes in them with a forstner bit to provide solid blocked support at the rear of the table.

After a lot of sanding, the table is glued, screwed down, and then the countersunk screw holes were plugged and sanded flush. Except for applying finish, this completes the basic saw construction.
I wanted to start with the finish today, but it rained most of the day. I planned on polyurethane for this project. I have had bad luck in the past with applying poly on rainy days, so I decided to set it aside until tomorrow, when the weather is supposed to be a lot nicer.
So, that’s it. As soon as I get the finish on and wire the switch, it’ll be posted in the projects section. I hope ya’ll have enjoyed this build.


-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/



21 comments so far

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14604 posts in 2277 days


#1 posted 832 days ago

Coming along nicely ;-) Hope is works as good as it looks.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View geoscann's profile

geoscann

258 posts in 881 days


#2 posted 832 days ago

WILLIAM it looks fantastic you need to get one off them big stop switchs and remove the plastic flap and replace it with a wooden one. but thats me it still looks really great.

-- BIG geo ---Occam,s razor The simplist answer is often correct

View DIYaholic's profile

DIYaholic

12951 posts in 1276 days


#3 posted 832 days ago

This saw is totally NUTS!!! Get it, nuts, PECAN. Oh how I make myself laugh.
It ain’t finished, ‘til it’s FINISHED!!!

A very impressive build. Truth be told, I woodn’t have expected anything less!!! Great job.

-- Randy-- I may not be good...but I am slow! If good things come to those who wait.... Why is procratination a bad thing?

View boxcarmarty's profile

boxcarmarty

9006 posts in 961 days


#4 posted 832 days ago

I’m so excited, I had to tie my hands together to keep from planting a pecan tree. What is the reason for the cut channel for the blade instead of a hole???

-- My mind is like lighting, one brilliant flash, then its gone.....

View William's profile (online now)

William

8912 posts in 1444 days


#5 posted 832 days ago

Thank you fellas.
I hope to have it posted as a project as soon as I can, maybe in a day or two. I promise to provide proof it works as well.
Truth be told, I’ve already tested it. It works. I can’t cut much on it yet though. I need to finish it before putting lock tite on the nuts. Right now, if you run it too long, the nuts vibrate loose. It’s not as quiet as my other scroll saws, but hey, I’m using a Black & Decker jig saw for a motor.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View Dave's profile

Dave

11142 posts in 1441 days


#6 posted 831 days ago

I love it. Put a petal on it and Ill take one. William that pecan will look great with some finish on it. A nice saw you have built. I know you have been wanting on of these. Now you have one. Great build.

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

View eddie's profile

eddie

7035 posts in 1215 days


#7 posted 831 days ago

William that looks like a great build of a scroll saw .been wanting one but my sister n law thats a master at the scroll saw said wait till i can afford a deep one. 25 ” throat depth is that,and its been raining down here too and building a table top i sprayed ploy you are right its not a good time to do it .i like it ,got to favor this.relly a great job on this.

-- Jesus Is Alright with me

View William's profile (online now)

William

8912 posts in 1444 days


#8 posted 831 days ago

Marty,
The slit is barely larger than the blade and allows the blade to slide in without a larger hole that’s in most scroll saws. This enables you to be able to cut smaller parts without having to have a zero clearance insert. In my opnion, ZCI don’t work well on scroll saws because there just isn’t much room to be threading the blade through without bending it too much. With the slit, like on this saw, you can slide your work piece out, thread the blade through, then slide it straight back and clamp it up. It’s just a better design in my opinion. One could absolutley do the hole instead of a slit if they wanted though.

Super,
I love pecan anyway. It is a beautiful wood. The magazine article recommended oak for this project. I was going to dig out oak. The first hardwood piece I came to was pecan though and I went with it. Yes, it is beatiful with a finish though. I can’t wait to have it done so I can post it.

Eddie,
It’s a shop made scroll saw. So the great thing about the twenty five inch throat is that you can make it even deeper if you want. However, I have to convince you though that a sixteen inch saw can do more than some people think they will.
My account was recently hacked, but if you’ve seen some of the very large scroll saw projects I’ve done in the past before they were deleted, everything was done on a 16” Delta scroll saw. It isn’t even one of the expensive models. It’s a Delta SS250 that I caught on clearance for $69.99.
As a matter of fact. Here’s a few examples. All were done on a 16” saw.

Four feet tall and eight foot wide.

Four feet wide and seven feet tall.

Five feet long (All parts for this one was cut on my Craftsman 16”)

Four feet tall and two feet wide.

Five feet long.

Five feet six inches long.
The secret is spiral blades. Let me know if you need pointers. I’ve been doing it for quite a while. With a sixteen inche saw and spiral blades, I can cut anything as long as it isn’t over thirty two inches wide at it’s narrowest side.
Now the reason I tell you all this is that, as much fun as this scroll saw build is, I don’t expect to get quite the precision out of it as I do my Delta or Craftsman saw. It will be a good saw for cutting large items. However, for things such as portraits, where the slightest imperfections can ruin the whole piece, I wouldn’t attempt to use this one I’m building.
If you’re truly interested in scrolling, I suggest getting what you can afford for now. I started out on a piece of crap Ryobi. It was the biggest piece of junk tool I’ve ever used in my life. However, I used that saw until I’d just about beat the bearings clean out of it. As much as I hated that saw, I’m glad I started with it. After getting used to a saw that I had to compensate for how much it would walk across the floor while I was cutting, I now feel I can scroll on any saw that is put in front of me.

Sorry for the diversion from the saw build fellas. Send me a PM if you ever want scrolling advice Eddie.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View boxcarmarty's profile

boxcarmarty

9006 posts in 961 days


#9 posted 831 days ago

Does that loose any stability in the table with it split? I would think that a hole would be more stable on that front edge…..

-- My mind is like lighting, one brilliant flash, then its gone.....

View William's profile (online now)

William

8912 posts in 1444 days


#10 posted 831 days ago

I will take a photo and post it tomorrow Marty.
In the front of the table, I drilled a three eighths hole. Then a dowel is pressed into the hole. There is no noticeable flex in the table, but this dowel guarantees it.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View boxcarmarty's profile

boxcarmarty

9006 posts in 961 days


#11 posted 831 days ago

The dowel should hold it in place ok. I’ve seen them used before in applications like that…..

-- My mind is like lighting, one brilliant flash, then its gone.....

View eddie's profile

eddie

7035 posts in 1215 days


#12 posted 831 days ago

thanks william those are amazing, i think you have helped to make my mind up .going to be looking for one.

-- Jesus Is Alright with me

View William's profile (online now)

William

8912 posts in 1444 days


#13 posted 831 days ago

Here’s a photo from Mathius Wandell’s site. That’s where I originally got the idea from.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View William's profile (online now)

William

8912 posts in 1444 days


#14 posted 831 days ago

Glad to be of assistance Eddie.
I’m all for the buying the best saw you can idea. It is sound advice in principle. However, if your finances are like a lot of people, you have to remember this. I’ve been saving for an Excaliber saw for well over three years now and haven’t got a dime saved. Everytime I get any money up, something goes wrong and takes my funds before I can even make a good start on the Excaliber fund.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View LittlePaw's profile

LittlePaw

1571 posts in 1680 days


#15 posted 831 days ago

WOW, and WOW and WOW! What else can I say? WOW!

-- LittlePAW - The sweetest sound in my shop, next to Mozart, is what a hand plane makes slicing a ribbon.

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