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Around The Coffeepot Ramblings #42: Why The Vise Climbed The Pole

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Blog entry by William posted 02-02-2012 04:26 AM 1376 reads 0 times favorited 30 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 41: Yet Another Circle Jig Part 42 of Around The Coffeepot Ramblings series Part 43: A Father's Pride »

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-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/



30 comments so far

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

11484 posts in 1435 days


#1 posted 02-02-2012 04:52 AM

Nice catch on the post vises! I have used BLO to keep things from rusting and it works really well after you get it cleaned up. It leaves a nice old finish (much nicer than paint). Just be sure to wipe it off well before it gets completely dry or it will be sticky for quite a while. Enjoy.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View William's profile

William

9264 posts in 1587 days


#2 posted 02-02-2012 05:01 AM

That’s an interesting idea I hadn’t thought of. I often don’t think about oil on anything on my wood shop besides finishes. If it is a good finish on wood though, it won’t hurt to use on the vice.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View cabmaker's profile

cabmaker

1311 posts in 1554 days


#3 posted 02-02-2012 05:07 AM

Nice grab on them two. The one on the right in pic. is for sure a columbian (5inch looks like) and I think the other one is too just with an earlier bench mount bracket. I have one like the first one and use it often when im wilding and like type stuff. Its hard to explain to anyone that has not used one, but once mounted youll see how tough those things really are. They instantly absorb and transfer a hammer whack through its length. Your not likely to find a blacksmith that does not have one. The spring is easy to fabricate or is also readily available from other sources. Enjoy it JB

View William's profile

William

9264 posts in 1587 days


#4 posted 02-02-2012 05:12 AM

Yes, cabmaker, the first time I seen one in a Lumberjock’s shop, I’ve wanted one. I realized that it would be much sturdier than the vice I have now. If for no other reason, the current vice is mounted to a table and only as sturdy as the table itself.
This vice will run to the floor and be as sturdy, especially from downwards blows from a hammer, as the concret floor of my shop.
The other thing I got to decide is how I want to mount the post on it. I have severl options I’ve considered.
Drill a hole in the concret with a concrete bit.
Use something like quickcrete and build up a spot around the base of the pole.
Or,
Even if I just mount it onto a large piece of wood, that I’ll be standing on while using the vice, the weight of my big butt will still make it extremely more stable than just a table mounted vice.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View Dave's profile

Dave

11205 posts in 1585 days


#5 posted 02-02-2012 05:30 AM

Woo woo! William you have scored big. I want everybody to know I dang near wrecked my company truck when he sent me that text. William I think I am going to try electrolysis and cook the rust off. If it works good on the one your giving me then we will do yours. I have also seen molasses used on car fenders that looks pretty promising.


thank you for your friendship and time

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

View cabmaker's profile

cabmaker

1311 posts in 1554 days


#6 posted 02-02-2012 05:33 AM

I have a 200 sq ft covered deck attached to the side of the shop. I have 4 4×4 posts there and I fabricated a bracket from angle iron that through bolts on one of the posts. I then welded a plate (approx 6×10) to the bracket and finally bolted the vice bracket to the plate. This bracket ofcoarse is set at the proper height to receive the vice s mounting when stood verticaly. For the base I simply screwed a 16 inch long 2×6 to the deck that receives the post. I did drill a shallow 1 inch hole in the block. I think that a block would be adequate over concrete as well. The amazing thing is that if someone drops a hammer or something similar on the wood deck you can feel the vibration in your feet but when wailing on that vice you hardley feel anything. Boy they got that design right. Im sure too that youve already felt how top heavy and unstable that thing is when holding it up by hand but its going to amaze you how sturdy it is once mounted. By the way its great dovetailing too. Let us know how it turns out. JB

View Dave's profile

Dave

11205 posts in 1585 days


#7 posted 02-02-2012 05:35 AM

cabmaker can we get a picture of your mount.

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

View William's profile

William

9264 posts in 1587 days


#8 posted 02-02-2012 05:54 AM

I too would love photo of your mount Cabmaker.
I’ve already got an idea how I wish to mount it, but other ideas won’t hurt.

My present plan arose after posting earlier and I went to the shop and done some measuring.
The plate that mounts to the bench is exactly six inches higher than the table I want to mount it on.
My plan is to glue up a huge block out of pecan. I choose pecan simply because it’s the hardest wood I have at the shop right now. Then I’ll drill a hole dead center of it for the “foot” of the vice to sit into. Then bolt it to the table.

Yes, I have already seen how top heavy it is when simply being held up by hand.
However, I have also noticed that if you hold it perfectly straight up and down, it will almost stand up on it’s on. This is where the stability comes at I think. When straight up and down, whether talking about the weight itself, or whacking on anything in it, the downward force is transferred straight down to the point that contact the floor. Therefore, unless you have it on a very unstable floor, it is solid as a building itself.

Yes, they disgned it well. I think it was built back when tools were designed the KISS method (keep it simple, stupid).

.

SuperD,
You may not get a chance to cook it. I am anxious to get it cleaned up and mounted as soon as humanly possible.
My wife nixed the idea of me going to the shop and cleaning on it tonight.
I will be sure to update this post as work is done on it.

As always, stay tuned guys.
Until the day the wife posts that I bought the farm, I’ll come up with something interesting to post. When I get to where I can’s get to the shop, I’ll just sit all day and make jokes at ya’ll.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View William's profile

William

9264 posts in 1587 days


#9 posted 02-02-2012 05:57 AM

I went and watched you video SuperD.
You’re gonna need a bigger bin to cook this. The main post is like 36” long by itself. If you don’t disassemble it, the clamping part of it extends another six or eight inches above that.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View Dave's profile

Dave

11205 posts in 1585 days


#10 posted 02-02-2012 06:11 AM

Kiddie pool and and washing soda. I’m going to make rust soup.

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

View cabmaker's profile

cabmaker

1311 posts in 1554 days


#11 posted 02-02-2012 06:14 AM

superdav, I ll see what I can do. I ll get a pic in the morning and get my wife to post it. I know how to do a few things but that is not one of em.

View KTMM (Krunkthemadman)'s profile

KTMM (Krunkthemadman)

973 posts in 1939 days


#12 posted 02-02-2012 06:15 AM

Dave, I meant to give you a couple of saw blades last night, I picked up about 3 distons in good but rusty shape for $4-$5 each. Too bad I had other crap on my mind. I have made the ultimate decision that I am done with side work after this, it’s cutting into my shop time way too much.

Here’s the vise I ordered yesterday along with my Starrett combo square and some blades for the TSP…...

http://www.highlandwoodworking.com/eclipse-10-quick-release-bench-vise.aspx

-- Practice does not make perfect. Only perfect practice makes perfect. Vince Lombardi

View William's profile

William

9264 posts in 1587 days


#13 posted 02-02-2012 06:16 AM

I was doing some reading on these vices.
I was curious what that round part on the back part of the clamping mechanism is. That is meant to be a small anvil. I assume it might do for small things like hinges doing blacksmithing.

However, I will still be checking back with the guy about the full size anvils. Next time you come over, we’ll have to ride out there.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View cabmaker's profile

cabmaker

1311 posts in 1554 days


#14 posted 02-02-2012 06:19 AM

Thats not an anvil your seeing. That is the greese box for the screw. You dont want to beat on that but anywhere else is open season.

View William's profile

William

9264 posts in 1587 days


#15 posted 02-02-2012 06:24 AM

KTMM,
we’ve got to get you out to that old resale shop too. You might find something you just gotta have. Dave and I figured out that he has more stuff out back that interested us more than the glassware and stuff inside.

I tried talking the old guy out of one of the old hand saws he’s got hanging outside. I thought of you on those. He thinks those are gold though.
I don’t have photos, but they are this style of saws.

A lot older and rustier though.

.

My favorite piece at the store though, is an old washing machine.
I don’t dare ask about it. I like my marriage. I may be single if I bring that thing home. It’s an old one though with the ringer for ringing the excess water out of the clothes.
Under it is what interests me the most. The motor is hooked to a gear box. One side is off the gearbox so you can see the gears. It reminds me of the ring and pinion gear on an old Ford 8N tractor.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

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