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Project Mississippi #4: Mock Up

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Blog entry by William posted 07-01-2011 04:50 AM 738 reads 0 times favorited 9 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 3: The Hull Part 4 of Project Mississippi series Part 5: Is It Looking Like A Birdhouse Yet? »

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-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/



9 comments so far

View kenn's profile

kenn

788 posts in 2376 days


#1 posted 07-01-2011 07:57 AM

I agree with your wife, it’s big ! :)

-- Every cloud has a silver lining

View lilredweldingrod's profile

lilredweldingrod

2495 posts in 1763 days


#2 posted 07-01-2011 08:36 AM

I hope you have a BIG INDIAN helping you lug that from work station to work station. Are you planning on lead ballast in the bottom to keep it from capsizing?

View William's profile

William

9034 posts in 1498 days


#3 posted 07-01-2011 12:55 PM

weldingrod
As soon as the hull was done, it was moved to my roll around table so I wouldn’t have to move it until it is done. At that time, I don’t have access to a BIG INDIAN, but I have to strong young sons to move it. I don’t think I’m going to need lead ballast. I plan on sticking a 4×4 post in the ground with a 45 degree support on all four side of it to hold a wooden platform that the boat will be mounted to.
kenn
Big wasn’t actually the full intention. I wanted to keep it close to scale with the measurement of the real Mississippi Queen though. In order to do that, and still have room to add details without using a magnifying glass and tweezers, this is the smallest size I could come up with. The problem is that now this creates the probelm that I have the task to make it as nice as it is big.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View TheGravedigger's profile

TheGravedigger

963 posts in 2680 days


#4 posted 07-01-2011 01:18 PM

Funny how projects take on a life of their own. You think you’re running things, and then it tells you how it needs to be.

-- Robert - Visit my woodworking blog: http://littlegoodpieces.wordpress.com

View William's profile

William

9034 posts in 1498 days


#5 posted 07-01-2011 01:40 PM

So true Gravedigger.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View devann's profile

devann

1735 posts in 1348 days


#6 posted 07-02-2011 08:13 AM

So far, so good. Not quite like I had pictured it or the drawing I was making myself. But that’s what happens when one doesn’t do a scale drawing, and I know better having drawn pontoon boats and then converting them to scale drawings in the past. Only to see the end results drastically change.
William, are you going need John to come down from Canada with his forklift to get your birdhouse up high enough?

-- Darrell, making more sawdust than I know what to do with

View William's profile

William

9034 posts in 1498 days


#7 posted 07-02-2011 11:34 PM

Devann, I just read you responses to the last three blogs.
Thanks for all the encouragement.
No, I don’t think I’ll need a fork lift. It isn’t going to be too high. I am going to need my strong young boys to move it though. I’ve got it on my roll around table now so I don’t have to do any lifting on it. It’s going to be about six feet off the ground where I plan on mounting it.
I know that some say purple martin house have to be way off the ground, but I had one up here before about six feet off the ground, and never had any problems with it. Actually, with it closer to the ground, the sparrows seemed to leave the martins alone. When I had one way off the ground, it was a constant battle keeping sparrows out. They would come in, kill any baby martins, and run the adult martins off, take over the house, and crap all over everything.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View devann's profile

devann

1735 posts in 1348 days


#8 posted 07-03-2011 07:25 AM

Thanks for posting the info William. I always thought that I had to put them 15-20 feet off the ground. I get a good bit of conflicting information about things on the Internet. My brother has had a martin house at the same location about 15-20 feet off the ground and it has been hit twice by lightning in the past 15 years. He rebuilds and the martins come back, whats left of them. Same thing about bluebirds, on the web, info I find says go with 5-10 feet high. A fellow that has been buying bluebird houses from me told me that his are only 4 feet off the ground. He said all of his are full and ask for 5 more birdhouses today.

-- Darrell, making more sawdust than I know what to do with

View William's profile

William

9034 posts in 1498 days


#9 posted 07-03-2011 07:37 PM

I love birds. Something I have learned from experience about them is this though. You can read all the books, and online articles, and hear all the advice in the world. In the end though, the onl way to tell what a bird will or will not do, is to try it. It’s as simple as that. What one bird does at one location, does not in any way mean that the same will be true for the same species, but sometimes a different bird, at a different location.
Another thing is that if there is a lack of bird housing close by, the birds will do what people may do in the same situation. They’ll be perfectly happy with what is available. On the other hand though, if bird housing is plentiful, or even saturated, in your area, then your birdhouse design and location may have to be perfectly executed down to a science to attract the feathered friends.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

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