LumberJocks

Around The Coffeepot Ramblings #32: How Many Lumberjocks Does It Take To .........?

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Blog entry by William posted 1177 days ago 821 reads 0 times favorited 20 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 31: Do, Done, or Overdo? I Don't Know Part 32 of Around The Coffeepot Ramblings series Part 33: It Takes Two »

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-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/



20 comments so far

View Dave's profile

Dave

11149 posts in 1465 days


#1 posted 1177 days ago

Oh now there is no pressure, you know I have to split it perfectly. I think I will use a splitting wedge and a 3 lb hammer;)
William that looks great. I will be over with my Japanese saws in a bit. I cant wait to see the outcome. I don’t think you told the folks but that a chunk of cherry. It should look nice in a bit after the sun gets a holt of it.

Feeling a bit better?
I am, been riding my new steel horse all day. 62 miles to the gallon. And saddle bags waiting to carry saws..

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

View lilredweldingrod's profile

lilredweldingrod

2495 posts in 1732 days


#2 posted 1177 days ago

I don’t think the question is How many lumberjocks, Rather How many pots of coffee to steady Dave’s hand. lol
Here’s to a great time. Enjoy guys.

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1740 days


#3 posted 1177 days ago

great idea Rand personly I have to have 5 pots before my hands goes from shaking in inches
to be meassurred in mm at the mornings

William and Dave great fun you two have :-)

how many clever DIY´s does it take to shift a lightbulb …......... 7
one to holdfast in the used and the new bulb standing on the table
four to walk around with the table one to hold the new bulb beside the table
and the last is the one that knows how to give orders

have a great safe day in the shops
Dennis

View Sheila Landry (scrollgirl)'s profile

Sheila Landry (scrollgirl)

7558 posts in 1545 days


#4 posted 1177 days ago

That is a great book William! Patrick Speilman was one of the pioneers of modern scroll sawing I believe. I had the pleasure of going to his shop and meeting him at his home in Egg Harbor, Wisconsin a couple of years before he passed away. He was always one of my mentors and one of the nicest people you would ever want to meet.

He was a high school teacher before he became “famous” in woodworking and he actually wrote many text books for schools. He signed one and gave it to me, but it is in my storage in Chicago and I don’t remember the name of it. I suppose it doesn’t matter. It was just the fact that he offered it up and gave it to me that is important.

Those designs he does are what I call classics. They are something that I can see you liking – especially after seeing the type of projects you do like your chandelier and the beautiful desk you made.

The book stand will be great! It will be even more special being that the two of you worked together on it. You are lucky to be so close to some other LJ’s here. :)

Have a good day! Sheila

-- Designer/Artist/Teacher. Owner of Sheila Landry Designs (http://www.sheilalandrydesigns.com) Scroll saw, wood working and painting patterns and surfaces. "Knowledge is Power"

View Dave's profile

Dave

11149 posts in 1465 days


#5 posted 1177 days ago

Rand and Dennis, you know we have to have coffee. I got it so bad I loaded a full stanley thermos in my saddle bag over the tail pipe. The weight of the thermos pulled the bag down over the pipe and burnt a hole in it. The coffee was still hot;)
Very nice story Sheila. The man lives in his books and the people he has met.
Thanks everyone…

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

View William's profile

William

8972 posts in 1468 days


#6 posted 1177 days ago

I’m sorry SuperD. I forgot about telling the wood species. I do plan on setting it in the sun after you do your thing. I want it to turn that reddish color you told me about before I put a finish on it.
How many pots does it take to get SuperD’s hands to the center of the bookstand? Sounds like a screwed up tootsie roll pop commercial to me. I will have the coffee ready when you come though. With this new pot though, you gotta pour it outside the door. I hate this thing. It is impossible to pour coffee into the cup without spilling it everywhere.
On the motorcycle, keeping the coffee hot is of the utmost importance. Nix the bag and attach metal straps to hold the thermos right next to the exhaust pipe. There you have a redneck coffee warmer. I remember a show from years ago where a guy cooked meals in his car to enjoy when he got where he was going. He attached corn on the cob in tin foil sitting on the exhaust. He cooked a steak medium rare sitting somehow on the intake manifold. He even had a bowl he found that he put inside the hubcap to keep the salad tossed. That’s thinking outside the box.
Dennis, you forgot that you need one more DIY fellow in there to explain to everyone that if the table was not built with handtools and the proper joinery techniques then they’d all better get down because the table will never hold.
Sheila, I have recognized the Patrick Speilman name since the beginning of my scrolling. It’s hard to even research scrolling much without his name popping up. He was one of the greatest. Another favorite of mine is Dirk Boelman.
Yes, there are some pretty good patterns in this book. I only seen a few complete projects that I liked enough to do. There are so many basic designs in there though that I may use in the future on larger projects. That’s the great thing about books like this one. It’s basic designs that can be used in so many ways by people like me that can’t draw a straight line without help. In the back of the book is several good beginner clock designs. I don’t particularly like them because I have done so many larger and more detailed clocks. I seen them though and thought they may be good designs of any of my younger sons ever want to try their hand at scrolling. They’re simple designs that still create real nice results on the finished piece. I’m glad I picked the book up at that yard sale. I only paid fifty cents for it.
Another interesting thing I found in the book though. Anyone remember the seven foot tall desk cabinet I recently done? There was an arch that went across the middle of the bottom section. It’s called a victorian arch. I knew that. What I didn’t know until yesterday was that the arch on that cabinet was designed by Patrick Speilman. The cabinet itself was desinged by someone else. That arch though, the exact arch, was in this book. I wasn’t sure when I first seen the pattern for it in there. Then I flipped the page where it shows an example of the arch in furniture design, and there’s the bottom of the cabinet. It doesn’t say so, but if you look carefully in the photo you can see the bottom of the drawer details, and the enclosed shelf details to each side of the arch.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View jerrells's profile

jerrells

847 posts in 1510 days


#7 posted 1177 days ago

I have many of the Spielman books and always searching for more. He too inspires me more that most any other pattern designer; Shelia is #2.

Now IF a coffee pot is all you have, well that is good for the first two hours and then it gets to be BEER time in my shop

-- Just learning the craft my Lord and Savior Jesus Christ practiced.

View William's profile

William

8972 posts in 1468 days


#8 posted 1177 days ago

Well let me know jerrells if you ever want to come to my shop then so I can go get you some beer and get it on ice. I never was a beer drinker. I used to love tequila on a daily basis. I’m afraid I quit drinking some years ago though. I have no problem with others drinking in the shop, as long as they don’t try to dance on any tables and never put their beer down on my tools or tables. Liquid rings on anything makes me very very angry.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1740 days


#9 posted 1177 days ago

nop I didn´t becourse its was a woodworker like you who build it
and an average DIY wuoldn´t know how it was done :-)

you better have 25 pots ready at the time Sdav arive on the bike

Dennis

View William's profile

William

8972 posts in 1468 days


#10 posted 1177 days ago

and an average DIY wuoldn´t know how it was done :-)
You got me Dennis. I can’t argue with that logic.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View Dave's profile

Dave

11149 posts in 1465 days


#11 posted 1176 days ago

I heard someone say coffee….

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

View William's profile

William

8972 posts in 1468 days


#12 posted 1176 days ago

Coffee, coffee, COFFEEEEE!
If you dare go watch this one, be sure to be ready to read subtitles. It’s sang in french. Pause if you have to. Be sure to read all of it so you won’t get lost.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View Dave's profile

Dave

11149 posts in 1465 days


#13 posted 1176 days ago

Aint no copper getting my french press. Take the wife but leave the coffee pot alone.

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

View William's profile

William

8972 posts in 1468 days


#14 posted 1176 days ago

A friend of mine sent me the link to that video. I figured you might like it. I know now that I got too much south Louisiana in me. I actually understood some of that.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View littlecope's profile

littlecope

2894 posts in 2127 days


#15 posted 1176 days ago

Nice Work on the Book Stand, Both of You!!
Mr. Speilman started a lot of Scrollers on their journey… I bought one of his books the day I got my Saw, later obtained two more, and spent many hours cutting his designs and sharpening my abilities…
I cut that very pattern twice… once the same-size and then at 1 1/2X for a sign…
As for Coffee… I couldn’t live without it!! 8-D

-- Mike in Concord, NH---Unpleasant tasks are simply worthy challenges to improve skills.

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