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Desk Cabinet Project #5: 2nd Level Scroll Work

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Blog entry by William posted 03-28-2011 05:32 AM 735 reads 0 times favorited 7 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 4: Going For Level Two Part 5 of Desk Cabinet Project series Part 6: Rounding Second, Headed For Third »

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-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/



7 comments so far

View Lee A. Jesberger's profile

Lee A. Jesberger

6648 posts in 2633 days


#1 posted 03-28-2011 11:09 AM

You sure do move quick, WIlliam.

This is looking really good.

Lee

-- by Lee A. Jesberger http://www.prowoodworkingtips.com http://www.ezee-feed.com

View Dave's profile

Dave

11168 posts in 1493 days


#2 posted 03-28-2011 01:41 PM

I feel you on the kids and spinning bits. I had to place a mirror on the opposite wall so I could see who was coming in. They have learned not to walk up to me when I am doing something dangerous. The radio blaring don’t help much.
The project is looking very good.

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

View William's profile

William

9024 posts in 1495 days


#3 posted 03-28-2011 03:57 PM

I try not to say too much to them about certain things just to keep myself from seeming like a complete @$$. I want to always be there for them when they need me, so I usually stop anything I’m doing when they come in trying to talk to me.
I had to speak to one of my older sons though. He’s eighteen and should kow better. Twice on this project, once when I was getting ready to cut the miters for the base trim, and one when I had pencil and scrap wood figuring out an angle for the second level gables, he has messed me up. Both times, he walked up just as I was figuring numbers in my head. I was getting ready to lower the miter saw when he started blurting out whatever it was he was wanting to ask. Both times I went ahead with the cut only to have to plane more wood to start over with. I explained to him that when you see someone concentrating on something intentely (especially angles for me), step back and wait for them to finish the cut of what they’re doing beore speaking.
I think this is an interesting point to bring up because it’s not just a nuisance issue. It is also very much a safety issue.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View William's profile

William

9024 posts in 1495 days


#4 posted 03-28-2011 04:09 PM

And thank you Lee. I did notice you have commented positively on about three of my blog installments in the last couple of days. I apologize. I had a real bad day there and then the days since that one haven’t been all that great. So the last few days I have gotten online to quickly update everything before going to bed. I haven’t really taken time to respond to anything besides my own need for rest.
I guess I’m going to give up and concede that some could see that I move quickly. I only wish I felt the same way. Considering the amount of time I spend in my shop, I’m moving at the pace of a turtle. Unless I’m down too bad in my wheelchair, I spend way more hours in the shop than what my work shows. Usually the only time I come to the house is to eat, bath, and sleep, and you have to realize I only sleep on average about four hours a night. Then there’s the days that I can barely move that I spend at the shop just reading wood working magazines or sitting in the front door watching traffic go by. If only I could be working during these times.
Most days, forty to fifty percent of my time is spent sitting and resting my back so I can be able to give it another go for short bursts of productivity. If my back would hold up to constant standing and working, I could build things at least twice as fast. That aggrevates me. So I hope you all can understand why I don’t feel I’m moving so fast.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View William's profile

William

9024 posts in 1495 days


#5 posted 03-28-2011 04:15 PM

I’m breaking this post up to keep seperate ideas seperated.
I had a visitor to the shop yesterday. During our discussions, we got on another interesting topic about my woodwork I thought may be of interest to some of you.
Some of you have heard this story before, probably a couple of times, but I’m going to tell it again to make the point I’m trying to make.
September of 2008 my wife told me she was going to get me a scroll saw for my birthday. My initial reaction was, “What the hell do I need a scroll saw for?” Well I came home and looked it up on the internet, to find out what a scroll saw was, and decided I wanted to give it a try. So, she bought me a Ryobi scroll saw that year for my birthday.
So that was two and a half years ago. The point I’m making is that I’m a newby. I’ve only been doing this type of woodwork for two and a half years. I wonder now how well I would be at this if I had picked it up when I was a young man.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View Dave's profile

Dave

11168 posts in 1493 days


#6 posted 03-28-2011 09:11 PM

Rembrandt, you would be doing marquetry and intarsia. Making clocks out of all wood, clockworks and all. And probably trying to figure out how to make a Chevy small block on a cnc machine;)

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

View William's profile

William

9024 posts in 1495 days


#7 posted 03-29-2011 03:04 AM

You’re joking, but I have done some thinking on creating a working model of a small block, all out of wood that can come apart for demonstration purposes.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

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