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L'il Skipper Project #1: Starting The Build

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Blog entry by William posted 09-14-2010 06:51 PM 835 reads 0 times favorited 9 comments Add to Favorites Watch
no previous part Part 1 of L'il Skipper Project series Part 2: Boat Details and Finish »

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-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/



9 comments so far

View Sheila Landry (scrollgirl)'s profile

Sheila Landry (scrollgirl)

7885 posts in 1663 days


#1 posted 09-14-2010 06:59 PM

It really looks cool, William! I have never tried to bent wood before either, so I am watching your blog with interest. It is amazing, isn’t it how it is kind of hard to be sad when we are in the process of doing something so creative. I am glad to hear that you found something positive to focus on and that you are having fun doing it. Those are the best projects! Thanks for sharing your story with us and I am looking forward to seeing how this one turns out.

Take care, Sheila

-- Designer/Artist/Teacher. Owner of Sheila Landry Designs (http://www.sheilalandrydesigns.com) Scroll saw, wood working and painting patterns and surfaces. "Knowledge is Power"

View William's profile

William

9263 posts in 1586 days


#2 posted 09-14-2010 07:18 PM

Well actually, the bending part is over, but there is a lot more work to do. I’ll be heading back to the shop here in a few minutes for more.
I don’t really know if there is a proper way to bend wood. The plans called for plywood. Like I said thouh, I don’t like plywood. The way I bent this was I just started on one end. I started on the rear of the boat since it gave me the flatest area to clamp too so I could be sure to get a good seal with my glue. My thinking was that none of this was going to work if my beginning didn’t hold. I used brad nails in my nail gun and Gorilla wood glue. From the start of that end, working in about six to nine inch steps, I just glued, clamped nailed, let the glue dry for about thirty minutes, then moved on to the next step (six to nine inches at a time) and glued, clamped and nailed.
I hope that makes sense. If not, let me know and I’ll try to explain it better.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View William's profile

William

9263 posts in 1586 days


#3 posted 09-14-2010 07:23 PM

Oh, something else that may interest you Sheila. The straight cuts are done on a table saw, but all the curved cuts are done on my old Craftsman Direct Drive scroll saw. The reason I specify the old Craftsman is you’ll hear me refer to it a lot when making larger projects. It only takes pinned blades. It has slots that hold the blades though that allow you to use it like a regular scroll saw or turn the blades sideways and work like sort of a miniature band saw. I wasn’t sure if you’ve seen anything like this before, but it works great. For larger pieces that I need cut accurately, like these, I prefer the scroll saw because I can make a more controlled cut. I love mentioning this little tidbit of information to people though becuase I like to point out things done on the scroll saw that isn’t what people normally associate with scroll work.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View Bearpie's profile

Bearpie

2592 posts in 1761 days


#4 posted 09-14-2010 07:27 PM

Cool boat! You did a fine job and some lucky child will go on a journey/sail with it and catch lots of huge fish you imagined catching while building this, see, it filters down and out! Thanks for letting my inner child out for a moment!

Erwin, Jacksonville, FL

-- Erwin, Jacksonville, FL

View Sheila Landry (scrollgirl)'s profile

Sheila Landry (scrollgirl)

7885 posts in 1663 days


#5 posted 09-14-2010 07:40 PM

I have heard of those William and I think that is a great way to use it. Many people have scroll saws like that in their shop and never intend to use it as I do, but more like you have used it in a project such as this. I didn’t realize though on that one that the blade could be put in sideways to make a mini-band saw. That is so cool! I can see it being really helpful in situations like you used it. That is a great thing to mention! :)

Sheila

-- Designer/Artist/Teacher. Owner of Sheila Landry Designs (http://www.sheilalandrydesigns.com) Scroll saw, wood working and painting patterns and surfaces. "Knowledge is Power"

View TheGravedigger's profile

TheGravedigger

963 posts in 2768 days


#6 posted 09-14-2010 07:47 PM

I remember those old scrollsaws! I haven’t seen one in years. Hey, don’t feel like the Lone Ranger. I had to do without a tablesaw for over 10 years. You learn to adapt & work with what you have. Looks like an interesting project. Hey, I live over in Raymond. Give me a holler if you’re out my way.

-- Robert - Visit my woodworking blog: http://littlegoodpieces.wordpress.com

View Div's profile

Div

1653 posts in 1684 days


#7 posted 09-14-2010 10:25 PM

Yip, sweet talking the wood can do wonders! That is one of the secrets of bending wood. Don’t tell any one!
Good going!

Enjoy the build
Div (ex boatbuilder, now furniture maker)

-- Div @ the bottom end of Africa. "A woodworker's sharpest tool should be his mind."

View William's profile

William

9263 posts in 1586 days


#8 posted 09-16-2010 10:30 AM

I’ll absolutely let you know next time I head that direction Gravedigger. I enjoy meeting fellow woodworkers. Also let me know if you head towards Vicksburg. My shop’s always open, as long as you let me know you’re coming ahead of time so I can make sure it’s open.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View BigTiny's profile

BigTiny

1664 posts in 1632 days


#9 posted 09-16-2010 02:38 PM

Hi William.

Great build.

Here’s a tip for bending thin wood like that: fill the bathtub with hot water, the hotter the better, and soak the wood for about ten to fifteen minutes. Then, quick as possible, wipe it off with a towel and glue and nail it in place. When you’re ready to start installing the first piece, toss the second one into the tub. They should not be allowed to cool off too much, nor allowed to dry out, as they will stiffen up again and warp as well. The fact that they are being attached to other pieces that will hold them in place will keep them from warping once they are installed.

Hope this helps.

-- The nicer the nice, the higher the price!

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