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Cabinet Progress #4: Carcase Cuts

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Blog entry by gizmodyne posted 2682 days ago 1643 reads 0 times favorited 19 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 3: Doors for everyone! Part 4 of Cabinet Progress series Part 5: Video Blog: Biscuit Boy »

La Bamba
I hunted down a source for vertical grain douglas fir plywood for our our kitchen cabinet project. So after about a month of procrastinating and a little bit of nice California weather, I took off after work to Phillips Plywood.

Photo from phillipsplywood.com

They are located in Pacoima. (Think Esau Morales, "Riiiiitchieeeeee!!!!!"). I called in my order and voila: $700 bucks lighter and thirty minutes later I was trucking home with 5 sheets of 3/4 and 3 sheets of 1/4. Nice place. Nice Staff. They even carry a a few tools and hardwood.

Lambada
So I got the vertical grain plywood laid horizontal onto some sawhorses Friday night, back into the car Saturday, and into the shop.
Cart o' Plywood (Not Shown at Actual Size).

Kristin helped me wrestle the plywood onto the tablesaw. My teacher gave us a few pointers. And the forbiden dance began.

I manhandle the plywood.

I have never tangled with full sheets of 3/4 material on the table saw. I have a new respect for all you cabinetmakers. It is heavy and awkward. I had to trim it oversized and then rip it to final width twice with a flip in between to get clean edges.

Sangre
The 1/4" stuff is Sharp! First blood!
My chance at hand model ruined. Sniff.
My teacher said it was the worst cut of any class he has taught. I felt honored but skeptical because I have seen a few wicked injuries in Sunday furniture class. (Random Orbit Sanders Gone Bad.)

Felicidad
We got all the parts for four cabinets ripped and then set up the crosscut sled.
Crosscut Master.
When the sawdust had settled we had all or our base cabinet parts cut including the backs.
Our car loaded with 40+ cabinet parts and a lot of scrap.

Now I will note that we spent about an hour remeasuring and planning out all of our cuts. We also had some backup wood. One thing we have learned: Mill or cut plenty of extra for setup and screwup.
A little preperado goes a long way: Our base cabinet drawings from Sketchup and cutlists.

-- -John "Do I have to keep typing a smiley? Just assume it's a joke." www.flickr.com/photos/gizmodyne



19 comments so far

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12255 posts in 2698 days


#1 posted 2682 days ago

Ouch!!! But it looks like you won in the end. The plans look nice, what software was used to create them?

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View gizmodyne's profile

gizmodyne

1763 posts in 2691 days


#2 posted 2682 days ago

Sketchup and Excel

-- -John "Do I have to keep typing a smiley? Just assume it's a joke." www.flickr.com/photos/gizmodyne

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12255 posts in 2698 days


#3 posted 2682 days ago

I’m going to have to give sketchup a look. Been doing all of my graphics in Visio.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View gizmodyne's profile

gizmodyne

1763 posts in 2691 days


#4 posted 2682 days ago

I recommend it. The price is right and it is full featured.

-- -John "Do I have to keep typing a smiley? Just assume it's a joke." www.flickr.com/photos/gizmodyne

View Karson's profile

Karson

34858 posts in 3002 days


#5 posted 2681 days ago

Giz On the pictures of the sketchup drawings the table saw is all red. I hope that not extra blood there.

And keep it off the wood. Screws up the finishing.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †

View Todd A. Clippinger's profile

Todd A. Clippinger

8717 posts in 2701 days


#6 posted 2681 days ago

I love what you are doing and I truly envy the tools you get to use. Cabinet shops that don’t make the commitment to the commercial grade tools don’t do well.

There is nothing wrong with using commercial grade equipment in producing furniture or cabinetry. It is both faster and more accurate in it’s execution than any of us. It is the lack of balancing that machine out with good judgement by the operator on material orientation and placement. In studying furniture and the manufacturing process, the Stickley Furniture Co. and Thos. Moser are to be admired for the balance of high speed equipment and the good decisions they make in assembly. They achieve a high level of quality. It takes time to make those placements and decisions, and that is why most do not.

I am really jealous of where you live, so close to the historical bungalows, how inspirational!

-- Todd A. Clippinger, Montana, http://americancraftsmanworkshop.com

View gizmodyne's profile

gizmodyne

1763 posts in 2691 days


#7 posted 2681 days ago

That is a 3 or 5 hp unisaw (not sure which). What makes it effective is the amount of space around it. The outfeed table is 8 ft long. The long fence helps too.

As to using the “commercial” equipment I think design is a critical component. Good design and planning will put you ahead.

In all of the courses we must prepare a set of drawings, a cutlist, a materials list, and a plan of procedure detailing the steps to be completed. This helps you think ahead and avoid many errors. It is like building the project in your head before it hits the shop.

I actually think most woodworkers would do better buying a great tablesaw then a billion little router jigs/ time savers.

Yes. I think being able to visit the Gamble House and Pasadena is a must for anyone who loves Arts and Crafts furniture.

-- -John "Do I have to keep typing a smiley? Just assume it's a joke." www.flickr.com/photos/gizmodyne

View Todd A. Clippinger's profile

Todd A. Clippinger

8717 posts in 2701 days


#8 posted 2681 days ago

It is on my list. The Greene and Greene is a strong influence for me.

-- Todd A. Clippinger, Montana, http://americancraftsmanworkshop.com

View gizmodyne's profile

gizmodyne

1763 posts in 2691 days


#9 posted 2681 days ago

Karson,

It’s just paint on the throat plate. Every once in a while there is a creepy and ominous stain in the shop. Keeps you honest.

John

-- -John "Do I have to keep typing a smiley? Just assume it's a joke." www.flickr.com/photos/gizmodyne

View oscorner's profile

oscorner

4564 posts in 2912 days


#10 posted 2680 days ago

Great looking plywood.

-- Jesus is Lord!

View gizmodyne's profile

gizmodyne

1763 posts in 2691 days


#11 posted 2680 days ago

I agree Os. The plywood blew me away. They have a huge display with each piece hanging from a wall at the store. One half is laqured and the other is left plain. Bubinga, fir, oak, mahog., you name it.

Cool place.

-- -John "Do I have to keep typing a smiley? Just assume it's a joke." www.flickr.com/photos/gizmodyne

View Drew1House's profile

Drew1House

425 posts in 2689 days


#12 posted 2680 days ago

Thats the school shop right?

Drew

-- Drew, Pleasant Grove, Utah

View gizmodyne's profile

gizmodyne

1763 posts in 2691 days


#13 posted 2680 days ago

Yes it is in the cabinetmaking shop. There are two huge machine rooms.

Here is a link to the program http://www.cerritos.edu/wood

-- -John "Do I have to keep typing a smiley? Just assume it's a joke." www.flickr.com/photos/gizmodyne

View oscorner's profile

oscorner

4564 posts in 2912 days


#14 posted 2679 days ago

Gizmodyne, sounds like the class needs to go over safe use of shop equipment and proceedures, again if you’ve seen more wicked injuries than yours. I know in my woodworking experience that there is little sharper than a nicely jointed piece of white oak and if not careful, it will bleed you.

-- Jesus is Lord!

View gizmodyne's profile

gizmodyne

1763 posts in 2691 days


#15 posted 2679 days ago

That actually is the strongest part of the program. Anything out of the ordinary requires instructor approval.

The injuries I saw involved someone cutting themselves on sandpaper. The air sanders really move, it fell off of the edge of the table and the user instictively reached for it. Extreme paper cut.

Here is a pdf link to their safety test and manual. There is good info for all woodworkers.

-- -John "Do I have to keep typing a smiley? Just assume it's a joke." www.flickr.com/photos/gizmodyne

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