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Cabinet Progress #15: Slow Progress

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Blog entry by gizmodyne posted 11-11-2007 04:53 AM 1096 reads 0 times favorited 20 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 14: And the Winner is..... Part 15 of Cabinet Progress series Part 16: Cabinet 2: Last Drawer Standing »

Before I install the dishwasher panel I need to fit a piece of trim to cover the mortar bed. So back to the wood pile.

I need 11 feet of trim so I pulled a 12 footer from my stash and began the resaw process.

First: Metal detector boogie and pull nails. (About 50 this time)

Getting ready to resaw. Tiny Shop!

Resawing:

My outfeed support.

Planer cleanup. Unfortunately a knot blew out, so I am going to have to scarf two pieces.

Trim stock.

Ran out of steam. It is cold. (58) Hopefully I will get it together tomorrow. It is my first time scribing which I am nervous about. Any advice?

-- -John "Do I have to keep typing a smiley? Just assume it's a joke." www.flickr.com/photos/gizmodyne



20 comments so far

View Todd A. Clippinger's profile

Todd A. Clippinger

8775 posts in 2753 days


#1 posted 11-11-2007 05:02 AM

Love the post. Love the bandsaw!

What are you scribing to?

-- Todd A. Clippinger, Montana, http://americancraftsmanworkshop.com

View Karson's profile

Karson

34876 posts in 3054 days


#2 posted 11-11-2007 05:05 AM

Nice stand for outfield. Where did you pick it up. (excuse me, Where did you get her!) Sorry.

Nice helper.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †

View Todd A. Clippinger's profile

Todd A. Clippinger

8775 posts in 2753 days


#3 posted 11-11-2007 05:14 AM

The safest way to get a good scribe is to use something like 1/4” hardboard and scribe and cut that. Test fit and adjust as necessary. MDF hardboard works good because it is consistent.

This makes a pattern that you can transfer to your finished piece of wood. This works good for complex scribing and reduces the risk of screwing up the materials, especially limited in quantity. For simple scribing, I just stick the board or trim against the surface to be scribed, lay the pencil on its side and make the mark.

-- Todd A. Clippinger, Montana, http://americancraftsmanworkshop.com

View gizmodyne's profile

gizmodyne

1763 posts in 2743 days


#4 posted 11-11-2007 05:31 AM

Thanks Todd. Good advice on the scribing. I am scribing up against tile (a bullnose cap) You can see the mortar bed. So I will be covering the plywood and mortar bed.

I am not sure how far to overlap the cabinet face frame. I do not want the board to shrink and reveal anything ugly.

-- -John "Do I have to keep typing a smiley? Just assume it's a joke." www.flickr.com/photos/gizmodyne

View Betsy's profile

Betsy

2914 posts in 2549 days


#5 posted 11-11-2007 05:34 AM

i like your bandsaw outfeed—- out the door.

I’m going to plead ignorance on the scribe thing. I’m assuming you are marking a line to match the contour of what you are applying trim to. I hope you take pictures of the process.

-- Like a bad penny, I keep coming back!

View gizmodyne's profile

gizmodyne

1763 posts in 2743 days


#6 posted 11-11-2007 05:41 AM

Karson. Yes. Best helper ever.

-- -John "Do I have to keep typing a smiley? Just assume it's a joke." www.flickr.com/photos/gizmodyne

View Todd A. Clippinger's profile

Todd A. Clippinger

8775 posts in 2753 days


#7 posted 11-11-2007 05:45 AM

I am not entirely clear of the order of your trim board and face frame. Is the scribed board to be scribed on its’ edge to go against the tile? Or are you trying to carve out the back of the board to lay flat over the squished out mortar?

-- Todd A. Clippinger, Montana, http://americancraftsmanworkshop.com

View gizmodyne's profile

gizmodyne

1763 posts in 2743 days


#8 posted 11-11-2007 05:46 AM

Todd. RE: the bandsaw.

It has been a great tool. 1 1/2 hp and 10” resaw capacity. This capacity is decent. I have not needed to go over that yet. I keep a 1/2” blade on the saw.

-- -John "Do I have to keep typing a smiley? Just assume it's a joke." www.flickr.com/photos/gizmodyne

View gizmodyne's profile

gizmodyne

1763 posts in 2743 days


#9 posted 11-11-2007 05:47 AM

The mortar is completely flat. I am scribing the top edge of the board.

-- -John "Do I have to keep typing a smiley? Just assume it's a joke." www.flickr.com/photos/gizmodyne

View Todd A. Clippinger's profile

Todd A. Clippinger

8775 posts in 2753 days


#10 posted 11-11-2007 05:56 AM

Can the scribed board be the top rail of the face frame? I am zooming in on the image but I am viewing it on a 13” laptop, and the picture gets dark and vague for me at the bottom.

I would definitely go with creating the pattern with a disposable scribing strip out of hardboard to be safe. I always have some of this material in the shop because it is inexpensive and is very versatile in making templates, jigs, and patterns.

-- Todd A. Clippinger, Montana, http://americancraftsmanworkshop.com

View gizmodyne's profile

gizmodyne

1763 posts in 2743 days


#11 posted 11-11-2007 06:03 AM

The scribed board will go between the existing top rail and the tile.

-- -John "Do I have to keep typing a smiley? Just assume it's a joke." www.flickr.com/photos/gizmodyne

View Todd A. Clippinger's profile

Todd A. Clippinger

8775 posts in 2753 days


#12 posted 11-11-2007 06:16 AM

I don’t think that you will have to worry about it shrinking and exposing much. Your trim is not that wide and the shrinkage will be negligible. Will a 1/4” overlap be too much and encroach into anything else like the doors?

-- Todd A. Clippinger, Montana, http://americancraftsmanworkshop.com

View Todd A. Clippinger's profile

Todd A. Clippinger

8775 posts in 2753 days


#13 posted 11-11-2007 06:16 AM

Also how thick is it to be?

-- Todd A. Clippinger, Montana, http://americancraftsmanworkshop.com

View gizmodyne's profile

gizmodyne

1763 posts in 2743 days


#14 posted 11-11-2007 06:18 AM

1/4” thick. 2 3/4” max width.

There is a skinny 1” rail at the top. I thought about just an 1/8 overlay.

-- -John "Do I have to keep typing a smiley? Just assume it's a joke." www.flickr.com/photos/gizmodyne

View Todd A. Clippinger's profile

Todd A. Clippinger

8775 posts in 2753 days


#15 posted 11-11-2007 06:24 AM

An 1/8” overlay would be what I would shoot for. 1/4” would allow extra security for exessive deviations in construction. I don’t know how bad the situation is in your house, I know how bad it can be. I had in mind that it would be 1/4” thick as you are doing. I must be envisioning your plan accurately. These are long distance recommendations.

-- Todd A. Clippinger, Montana, http://americancraftsmanworkshop.com

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