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Cabinet Progress #11: The Dark of Night and A Call for Help from any Lumberjocks

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Blog entry by gizmodyne posted 05-15-2007 04:16 PM 2083 reads 0 times favorited 7 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 10: Going to Pieces Part 11 of Cabinet Progress series Part 12: T- 48 Hours »

Yes… More Sanding
I put the last coat of poly on the caracases and drawer interiors, had dinner, and then we both went out to the shop and did not finish til’ around 11:30 p.m.


Kristin sands the drawer faces.


She is just pretending to enjoy this.

Two Step Staining
If you saw our video on staining douglas fir.. you know that we use a washcoat of mineral spirits and boiled linseed oil followed by mahogany gel stain.

To be exact.. I apply the washcoat, Kristin applies the stain, I wipe the excess stain.


Picasso adds her touch.


Door with one coat of stain.

We learned to let the stain sit for quite a while so that it flashes up and removes evenly.


The face frame with one coat

Help Us Please
After staining we noticed one door with a nasty cross grain scatch going across six inches.

Does anyone have advice how to repair this? The scratches of course are darker.

Can we just sand and stain this area and restain? Do we have to sand the whole thing?

Lumberjocks… Help! Please..

-- -John "Do I have to keep typing a smiley? Just assume it's a joke." www.flickr.com/photos/gizmodyne



7 comments so far

View PanamaJack's profile

PanamaJack

4473 posts in 2801 days


#1 posted 05-15-2007 05:19 PM

Great color on this cabinet Giz & Picasso!

All I have ever done is re-sand then re-stain…however I do not know if this the best way or the fastest way to do it. I know you are in a time crunch Giz. Sorry I cannot do better.

-- Carpe Lignum; Tornare Lignum (Seize the wood, to Turn the wood)

View Tony's profile

Tony

978 posts in 2754 days


#2 posted 05-15-2007 07:27 PM

This is a difficult one! Without being there to see it. It really depends in how deep the scratch is and how deep the finnish has penatrated the timber.

If you manage to sand the arear of the scratch, you will have an uneven surface in the area of the scratch, you will also then have to blend the new stain and finish to match the unsanded area.

I think I would sand the whole surface that is damaged to make it uniform. Mask around the edge of the frame, when re-finnishig to stop a second coat of finnish going onto the origanal (unsanded area). Take care between those slats if you you not sand them clean, they will pick up additional stain very easily.

Good luck, just think it out, then think again about what can go wrong – then work around the problem. I look forward to seeing the completed project.

-- Tony - All things are possible, just some things are more difficult than others! - SKYPE: Heron2005 (http://www.poydatjatuolit.fi)

View Don's profile

Don

2600 posts in 2900 days


#3 posted 05-15-2007 09:31 PM

I agree with Tony. I think a localized attempt to hide the scratch would always be noticeable. It would look like a patch-up. Take the additional time to re-do the entire surface and you will be much happier with the result.

-- CanuckDon "I just love small wooden boxes!" http://www.dpb-photos.com/

View Sawdust2's profile

Sawdust2

1467 posts in 2811 days


#4 posted 05-16-2007 02:50 AM

Before you go to all the sanding trouble try a little almond paste. If the scratch is not too deep it might solve the problem. If it doesn’t then sand it down.
I got mine at Highland Woodworking. I assume that Rockler or Woodcraft might also have it.

-- No piece is cut too short. It was meant for a smaller project.

View oscorner's profile

oscorner

4564 posts in 3034 days


#5 posted 05-16-2007 02:55 AM

Looking good. Sorry to hear about the scratch.

-- Jesus is Lord!

View accalades's profile

accalades

5 posts in 2786 days


#6 posted 05-16-2007 02:56 AM

you aren’t going to like my advice. Take your random orbit sander with some 180 grit paper and sand the face frame, you don’t have to sand it bare but you have to do a good job feathering the stain from the scratch to the rest of the work. It’s a good idea to spend some time on the whole peice, make sure you get out all the scratches. re stain, and start shooting.

-- chris lambkin

View gizmodyne's profile

gizmodyne

1765 posts in 2813 days


#7 posted 05-16-2007 04:04 PM

Hi,

Thanks for all of the advice. I have been time crunched. I will post some some pics and the final solution soon.

-- -John "Do I have to keep typing a smiley? Just assume it's a joke." www.flickr.com/photos/gizmodyne

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