LumberJocks

found wood #17: more restaurant remodeling wood

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by Gary Fixler posted 1610 days ago 2142 reads 0 times favorited 16 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 16: Cora's Mexican restaurant wood Part 17 of found wood series Part 18: Chinese elm, finally! »

Another restaurant on the same street as the last one is being remodeled. I headed over one night to see if they threw anything good away and they sure had. The tall boards in the middle here were actually piled up on the dumpster (old boards to the right are from the other restaurant, pallet/crate wood to left from yet another!):

trashed boards

There’s some nicer grade 3/4” birch ply about 7’ long and more than a foot wide – handy for jigs and secondary structures. There was a plank of 1×10 pine about 8’ long and clean. There was a good, long 2×4, and a few bits of molding and smaller pine, all long lengths.

There was a mix of smaller boards piled up at the trash that looked to be full 4/4 pine and maybe some alder:

free boards rescued from trash

free boards rescued from trash

free boards rescued from trash

But the real find were these, and they were actually IN the dumpster, with a bunch of gritty construction trash on top of them. I just barely caught a peek of some end grain sticking out. My eyes are really trained to lock onto that stuff now. The world looks gray, save for bright, colorful spots wherever there’s wood grain :)

free hardwood boards rescued from trash

These look to be something like ipe decking boards, clean, solid, dense, and very heavy. They have rounded edges – all 4 – but none of the stuff normal flooring and some decking can have, like the grooves running the length. These will be fantastic sources of good, dark hardwood. Very pretty, all between about 28-32 inches:

free hardwood boards rescued from trash

free hardwood boards rescued from trash

Here’s the beveled end grain from some of the flat boards – they were all beveled on both sides:

end grain of free hardwood boards rescued from trash

end grain of free hardwood boards rescued from trash

This one’s a 2×2 (1.5×1.5), about 3’ long:

end grain of free hardwood boards rescued from trash

I had another big find this morning that I’ll post about soon. I’m rather excited about it.

-- Gary, Los Angeles, video game animator



16 comments so far

View Broda's profile

Broda

313 posts in 2155 days


#1 posted 1610 days ago

no idea on the wood but good find though!

-- BRODY. NSW AUSTRALIA -arguments with turnings are rarely productive-

View degoose's profile

degoose

6999 posts in 1990 days


#2 posted 1610 days ago

The boards look like Merbau or Kwila… comes from the south Pacific and New Guninea and Indonesia… used a lot for decking. Very dense and resistant to rotting.

-- Drink twice... and don't bother to cut... @ lazylarrywoodworks.com.au For lovers of all things timber...

View Dyidawg's profile

Dyidawg

51 posts in 1649 days


#3 posted 1609 days ago

I got to start hunting out these places. I’m in Ventura County

-- Wow, that was easy. Just follow the directions and use some common sense.

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1751 days


#4 posted 1609 days ago

nothing is better than FREE-BEE
niice score
congrat´s

Dennis

View Gary Fixler's profile

Gary Fixler

1000 posts in 2017 days


#5 posted 1609 days ago

Larry – You got me curious, as I don’t know much about these really dense, darker hardwoods from exotic locales. As usual, Hobbit House had some good info. It looks like kwila/merbau (apparently names for the same thing) is a bit more chocolaty in color with much larger pores and a pretty open grain. Some of the open grain reminds me of oak, while at other times it looks a lot like the odd slits you see in surfaced wenge. Here's a link. It does have that tropical hardwood look, though, kind of like bamboo. I always like that. The long grain surfaces actually look a lot like Mangaris to me, which is a trade name sold locally here for a tree known as red balau. Actually, I stumbled upon some sad info too, about how kwila is all but depleted, and is actually in danger of going extinct.

I typed ipe in my post without really knowing much about it. I’ve seen a few decks made of it in photos online, but I’ve never seen any in real life before, nor looked for detailed grain pics online. Here's a link to ipe over at Hobbit’s. It’s a bit closer to what I found, and some of the boards look awfully similar, but I’m still not convinced that’s it, either. I had a look through a few related woods (according to Google), like jarrah and cumaru, but those were well off the mark. I would love to package up about a dozen samples of things I’ve tried to ID here and send them off to one of those labs that IDs woods for historians and lawyers.

-- Gary, Los Angeles, video game animator

View lew's profile

lew

10006 posts in 2391 days


#6 posted 1609 days ago

Nice Score!

By the looks of some of those boards, Gary, you may want to invest in a metal detector before planning them- after all that hard work you did with the bearings!

Lew

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View Gary Fixler's profile

Gary Fixler

1000 posts in 2017 days


#7 posted 1609 days ago

Lew – I’ve actually had one of these for about a year or so now. I used it on the pallet pieces that I turned into that recent cutting board. I’ll definitely be running it all around these things before I cut anything. I did a pretty good job tracking down everything visually, but there’s always that rogue one just waiting to ruin the day.

-- Gary, Los Angeles, video game animator

View HokieMojo's profile

HokieMojo

2098 posts in 2364 days


#8 posted 1609 days ago

gary,
I say ipe too. I got a small piece from my lumber retailer and it looks identical, especially the closeup shots. be careful when cutting. It has some pretty nasty dust. it also seems to splinter a bit so watch out if you drive screws or when chipout is a possibility. It will also dull non-carbide tips VERY fast.

View DaddyZ's profile

DaddyZ

2382 posts in 1676 days


#9 posted 1609 days ago

Nice Score

Free is always the way to go !

-- Pat - Worker of Wood, Collector of Tools, Father of one

View patron's profile

patron

13020 posts in 1977 days


#10 posted 1609 days ago

nice score once again gary ,

you might want to start looking for some place BIG ,
like paramount studios (LOL) !
to store all your finds .

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View lew's profile

lew

10006 posts in 2391 days


#11 posted 1609 days ago

I have the same detector. Really like it.

Don’t do what I did. Checked all the surfaces and edges but forgot the end. There was a staple there holding the UPC sticker in place. Put a nick in a brand new set of jointer blades. Crap!!—or a similar word!!!

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View Gary Fixler's profile

Gary Fixler

1000 posts in 2017 days


#12 posted 1609 days ago

Thanks, Hokie – sounds like a mixed blessing of a wood!

david – you know, I bet I could sneak in and find a very dusty storage area that clearly no one has been in for years. Might be a perfect drying locale :)

lew – I feel your pain. Precisely the same thing happened to me, only I hadn’t used the wand. I just looked all around a nice, clean piece of poplar from Home Depot, jointed it, then realized the UPC sticker on the end was held in by part of a staple. All of my cuts after that had a ridge down the middle. It’s amazing, but that one staple-thick line really messes up the jointer’s ability to flatten a board properly. It was near the end, so I could adjust the back guard forward to cover it, but those blades have been on there for a year since then. I’m afraid to bother changing them! It’s brought me down from 6” capability to probably 4.5”-5” :(

-- Gary, Los Angeles, video game animator

View Gary Fixler's profile

Gary Fixler

1000 posts in 2017 days


#13 posted 1609 days ago

Hokie – I did some research, as it’s looking like it might be ipe after all. What a pain in the neck wood it is! I thought it would make a really watertight end grain cutting board, but because it tends to be impregnated with silica particles, it dulls knives really fast. Too, end grain boards are tons of glue joints, and even with Titebond III the joints are terrible. Someone did tests between TIII and Gorilla Glue, the latter of which is supposed to be the better choice for the oily hardwood, and he said the joint was actually weaker with the GG. Other’s said wipe it down with acetone to pull away the oils. Another guy said he’s tried that, and the joints were again made weaker.

It dulls tools really fast, because of the silica. It’s like taking fine-grit sandpaper to your nice, sharp edges. Everyone says the dust is toxic, too. From what I know, breathing in a cloud of silica particles = silicosis = no thanks! Also, you have to predrill any screw fasteners, or you split the wood. Seems like what it has going for it is beauty and extreme resistance to bugs and rot. That’s about it. It’s a perfect decking material, but not great for much else I can imagine.

I’ll have to think long and hard about exactly what I’ll be able to do with this. Definitely don’t want to glue it up and turn it on the lathe. Not with weak glue joints, toxic dust, and my expensive lathe tools being worn down rapidly. I might use it as the deck for a sawing platform I want to build. One of my concerns for that has been rain and weather beating it up over the years. If I use pressure treated 4×4 risers, which I have laying around in 3’ lengths or so, and this for the deck upon which to roll the huge logs I want to saw up, I might end up with rather nice, and somewhat attractive little deck. The wood’s incredible weight will help hold it down sturdily, too.

-- Gary, Los Angeles, video game animator

View HokieMojo's profile

HokieMojo

2098 posts in 2364 days


#14 posted 1608 days ago

Decking like you said, but some people like it for their interior flooring too. I’m still thinking about whether this would make a good guitar pick when I eventually get back to this. It will do a number on my bandsaw blad though since it’s not a carbide blade. I’ll have to think about that one.

View alexsutula's profile

alexsutula

96 posts in 1690 days


#15 posted 1608 days ago

looks like brazilian cherry to me. I laid a couple floors out of it and it looks very similar

-- You can't stand apart unless you're prepared to stand alone. Alex, Cleveland

showing 1 through 15 of 16 comments

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase