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005: scrap cutoff shelves #2: and now there are two

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Blog entry by Gary Fixler posted 1637 days ago 1017 reads 0 times favorited 14 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 1: Finally got some of this lingering idea together Part 2 of 005: scrap cutoff shelves series Part 3: still filling them up »

All the pieces for both units were cut out at the same time, so there was another waiting to be assembled. I spent some time today on that. Here it is next to the first one, waiting to be filled up:

shorts cutoff shelves

I’ll have to find a new place to hang my roller stand, but that’s okay, as I’ve only been able to hang one of the two here on its over-the-rafters hooks. Right now it’s immediately in front of the new shelving:

roller stand obscures shelving

I learned something interesting about French cleats tonight, too. All things identical, it’s possible things won’t hang to the same height. The dimensions of the side panels are exact, cut at the same time without moving the fence. They could be stood on a flat surface and remain flush at the high end. The cleats were cut from one long board and only the top one was separated for use on the individual units. The cleats were installed on the backs of the units while they were upside down on the saw table, cleats and units flush on the table and clamped together. Yet, here the new unit hangs about 1/8”+ lower.

My best guess is that the 7’ long cleat halves were not cut perfectly straight down the middle, or they received some warping when I lightly planed the cut a bit to remove some saw burn, or most probably, that there is some sag against the wall. The wall does have a lot of warp in it. It’s just old drywall. At any rate, I don’t mind. It’s not enough to upset me. This is just utility shelving. It would have been nice to see it drop in and line up dead flush at the front, but alas, it’s no matter:

new unit hangs lower on French cleat

Another shot of the slightly lower new (right) shelving unit:

slightly lower new unit on French cleat

Most of what’s left in the few small piles in the shop of scrap cutoffs is very small stuff – a few inches in each direction. I’m thinking something like a planter box – 2’ wide, maybe 8” in the other dimensions – is actually a better solution for that. I could decimate these piles by gluing up things to turn on the lathe. I’ll have to think about it some more.

You can see I’m already putting random light things like miter saws up on top of these things. I will also bring in some of the smaller scraps that have worked their way into the wood shed and put them in the new shelving, especially anything around 2’ long, as I have an abundance of longer space in the top shelves. I’m also not above adding some hooks under these to hang a few odds and ends.

It’s nice to have more than enough shelving for once (and… for now :). With the new unit, I have somewhere between 130BF (flush volume) and say, 160BF (with pieces sticking out the fronts) of new scrap wood storage space. As I’ve said before, however, my plan going forward is to use these like a display device, helping me to see immediately what ‘free’ wood I have available, and hopefully encouraging me to peruse them and think of ideas for the scraps, so I don’t so much wait around for a need as come up with ideas based on the scrap itself.

-- Gary, Los Angeles, video game animator



14 comments so far

View patron's profile

patron

13000 posts in 1966 days


#1 posted 1637 days ago

can you glue a shim flat to the cleat ,
to raise it up ?

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View Gary Fixler's profile

Gary Fixler

1000 posts in 2006 days


#2 posted 1637 days ago

david – Brilliant! That I can do. I think I even have a pile of long, thin board-edge cutoffs that would do the trick with no work but the gluing. Thanks for the suggestion. I’ll let you know how it turns out.

-- Gary, Los Angeles, video game animator

View PineInTheAsh's profile

PineInTheAsh

401 posts in 1892 days


#3 posted 1637 days ago

Couple low-cost, quick-solution things I try to keep nestled in a shop drawer at all times:
packs of those big-box-store contractor/door installer shims…
and for micro-shimming, from Wal-Mart’s kitchenware section, boxes of both flat and round toothpicks.

—Peter

View lew's profile

lew

9991 posts in 2380 days


#4 posted 1637 days ago

It might be a little off, Gary, but they sure look nice.

Lew

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View JJohnston's profile

JJohnston

1577 posts in 1916 days


#5 posted 1637 days ago

I thought it was only me that couldn’t get cleat-hung units even. I speculated that it might be because the walls aren’t perfectly straight, so the cleats don’t mate perfectly.

-- "Sorry I'm late. Somebody tampered with my brakes." "You should have been early, then."

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14721 posts in 2300 days


#6 posted 1636 days ago

Did you screw it to the wall too or just let them hang on cleats?

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View Gary Fixler's profile

Gary Fixler

1000 posts in 2006 days


#7 posted 1636 days ago

They’re just hanging, Topamax.

Btw – special extra thanks to David – I had a long strip of poplar that was 0.075” by my digital calipers. It was half the difference in height, but in the 45° angle of the cleats, it brought the right one to exactly the right height with the other. They are dead flush now. Thanks again, David! You rock. I actually didn’t even glue it in. I just snipped it to length with some pruners, then laid it in the cleat and put the shelving back on top of it.

-- Gary, Los Angeles, video game animator

View patron's profile

patron

13000 posts in 1966 days


#8 posted 1636 days ago

well done gary ,

i wondered about those french cleats ,

i guess this seals the deal for me .

they work !

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14721 posts in 2300 days


#9 posted 1636 days ago

I’ve always wondered if that is secure enough here one the west coast for earth quakes??

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View Gary Fixler's profile

Gary Fixler

1000 posts in 2006 days


#10 posted 1636 days ago

I highly doubt it :)

-- Gary, Los Angeles, video game animator

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14721 posts in 2300 days


#11 posted 1636 days ago

A couple of screws into the cleats should take care of that. Never know when the “big one” will be here:-((

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View Gary Fixler's profile

Gary Fixler

1000 posts in 2006 days


#12 posted 1636 days ago

I suppose, but honestly, if a ‘big one’ hits, this garage is not going to survive it. Sigh…

Actually, It would probably hold down the units, but depending on how the wave ripples past, I would bet everything on the shelves gets ejected. A good one hit back in the 90s – as my landlady tells it – and not only did the house settle crookedly into the ground, requiring a full rebuild of the floors in the whole place, but her car was launched from the driveway into the middle of the lawn about 10’ away where it set back down on its wheels. I’m pretty sure after an earthquake of any size, my garage will be a complete disaster. Now that I think about it, if I had any money I’d think about taking out an insurance policy on all of the big tools.

-- Gary, Los Angeles, video game animator

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14721 posts in 2300 days


#13 posted 1636 days ago

WE have had a couple in the -7 range. Nothing has moved much. One I heard coming about 15-20 seconds before it got to the house coming from the north. There were a couple waves that went through the living room that looked to be about 6 or 8 inches high!! ;-))

we have EQ ins on the house, but the deductible is 20k. i guess they don’t wnat to be bothered with small damage ;-))

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14721 posts in 2300 days


#14 posted 1636 days ago

BTW, forgot to mention we had a house inspector looking for carpenter ants and termites. He was bound and determined the checks in the posts under eh house were EQ damage :-)) They were there when the house was a couple years old, but he wouldn’t have any part of that. EQW on the brain!! :-))

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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