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Homemade Band sawmill #2: Gantry with height adjustment mechanism

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Blog entry by geekwoodworker posted 10-05-2014 08:03 PM 5376 reads 1 time favorited 6 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 1: Building the frame Part 2 of Homemade Band sawmill series Part 3: Blade guides and guards »

I managed to get the gantry with height adjustment made this weekend.

Made two L shaped legs and put 5” wheels on them. I used 1/4” lag bolts to hold the wheels on.

To make the guides/clamps I made a box that the gantry can slide up and down on. I used 1/4” bolts to hold it all together with the front peice being loose. It is loose so it can be used as a clamp to hold the unit rigid during use. Just turn the handle and it gets super tight. It is held to the gantry with 4” long 1/4” lag bolts.





The height adjuster uses 1” threaded rod with 8 turns per inch. This makes it quick and easy to adjust. It is also easy to remove for teardown by removing the 4 lags bolts on the top of the gantry and the adjuster nut just slides out.

I also got the power hooked up to it and had it running. It runs nice and smooth. Just need to make blade guides and guards.



6 comments so far

View ezek1el's profile

ezek1el

64 posts in 1860 days


#1 posted 10-05-2014 08:09 PM

Its coming along pretty good sean, nice work! Im gonna have to stop by and check it out sometime! Cheers

View ezek1el's profile

ezek1el

64 posts in 1860 days


#2 posted 10-05-2014 08:23 PM

You will probably need to put cross pieces between your two legs at the bottom and the top to reinforce the legs. When the blade engages the log its gonna want to drag the whole gantry assembly on the side that the blade pulls.

View geekwoodworker's profile

geekwoodworker

355 posts in 928 days


#3 posted 10-05-2014 09:27 PM

I had it running and it is pretty smooth. I have thought about adding something across the top to add rigidity but then cranking it up and down wouldn’t work well. To adjust height you crank one side and then the other and it leans when doing so and a brace would make that impossible. Once the guides are clamped tight it is pretty solid.

Thanks Dom.

View Roger's profile

Roger

19886 posts in 2271 days


#4 posted 10-05-2014 10:12 PM

Coming along nicely. I’d like to see a short video of this working.

-- Roger from KY. Work/Play/Travel Safe. Keep your dust collector fed. Kentuk55@yahoo.com

View luv2learn's profile

luv2learn

2467 posts in 1770 days


#5 posted 10-05-2014 10:36 PM

You have made great progress Sean. I agree with Roger, you need to do a short video of your mill in action. Would there be any advantage to tying the two lifting rods together at the top via a couple sprockets connected by a chain? Cranking one side or the other would then lift both sides together. That, however, would add another level of complexity to an already real cool, real simple design.

-- Lee - Northern idaho~"If the women don't find you handsome, at least they ought to find you handy"~ Red Green

View geekwoodworker's profile

geekwoodworker

355 posts in 928 days


#6 posted 10-05-2014 11:09 PM

Roger- I am not very well setup to make video and post it as this is the extent of my capabilities. However I may in the future or at the end of this blog when it is completed.
Lee – at this point I am gonna leave it the way it is and see how it works. If all is good then I am happpy. If it needs stiffening then I will think of something at that time. I just hope it works the way it is cause I like it simple.

thanks

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