LumberJocks

'57 Century 15' 'Palomino' #4: Damage Inspection Time

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by gdcarpenter posted 03-21-2016 09:43 PM 712 reads 0 times favorited 2 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 3: Building Supports Part 4 of '57 Century 15' 'Palomino' series no next part

When I went to see the boat I noticed the crude chine replacement, done from inside the boat. There were also fiberglass patches in the area, but no signs of significant rot.

The hull is batten and plank construction. 3/8” thick by about 5” wide planks. Apparently the year my boat was bullt Century used ‘Phillipine Mahogany”, as opposed to “African Mahogany” in other years. Battens are white oak.

In this photo you can see the ‘new’ batten and ‘new’ gusset. All the gussets were pretty bad and will be replaced – I’m leaning towards 1/2” MDO epoxied in place for the gussets , as opposed to original screwed in place only.

The first plank below the chine is flat on the inside and curved on the outside, and about 3/4” thick in the middle. They are screwed into the intermediate floor cross rails to hold them in place.

Unfortunately I discovered that the frame members had been cut to facilitate installation of the new chine!

Here’s a shot post flip and you can see that, since sections of the main frames had been cut out, there has been some ‘give’!

This resulted in a not flat bottom!

After some bottom planks were removed it was easier to see how sections of frames had been cut out to replace the chine.

The GOOD news is that I can use the verticals side frames from the other side of the boat as templateas for new frames on the damaged side. Most battens and chines have some rot aft, but replacing them should be pretty straight forward. Replacing the chine will mean removing the splash rail, one side plank, and some fairing, but doable.

Here I have laid back in place 2 removed damaged planks. (I will be removing all the bottom planks) Backlighting shows the fiberglass patches. Seems to me she met a rock or log at some point in time!

I now have all but the garboard(?) bottom plank on one side removed and she looks like this. Removing the planks is a PITA! Find plugs, dig out filler, clean screw slot head, carefully screw out without stripping soft bronze silicone head. Each plank has about 150-160 countersunk screws/plugs!

Save for the clearly damaged ones I have sanded all the removed planks on both sides expecting to reuse them.

If you are still reading here are a couple of questions:

1) This boat has been ‘dry’ for over a decade. I plan on precoating the insides and edges of the planks with CPES prior to installation, do I butt them tight and hope that when/if she gets wet and swells they don’t buckle?
Or do I leave a small space between the planks?

2) I looked at the “West System” and “5200” bottoms, and do not feel that either is appropriarte. Call me misguided, but I hope that someday someone else may want to work on this boat again in another 25 years or so, and both systems mentioned above are permanent. I pan to ‘bed’ the planks to the battens with Sikaflex 291 LOT. (Long Open Time). Comments and suggestions?

3) I am concerned about using the sikaflex between the planks as it may not ‘give’ much if the boards swell. Any thoughts of using bedding compound between the planks as it can be ‘squished out’ more easily.

I am hoping, but less sure every step I take, that it will take less to restore this boat that’s it took to build my ‘other’ boat from scratch. :)



2 comments so far

View htl's profile

htl

2215 posts in 625 days


#1 posted 03-21-2016 10:00 PM

You’ve got to really love a boat to put this much work into it.
I know it’s a different mind set and say more power to you and your project.
It will be so cool when you are finally able to put her in the water and let her sail again.

-- There's a hundred ways to do anything, alot depends on the tools at hand.

View GROOVY56's profile

GROOVY56

19 posts in 1385 days


#2 posted 03-22-2016 01:12 AM

Congratulations , Good Luck and all, I rebuilt a 1957 Chris Craft Cavalier.
The Best advise I got was “the more you change it the less original it gets”

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com