LumberJocks

Old and new Projects in a New Workshop #4: Adjustable outfeed table for my table saw

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Blog entry by garyjs posted 1086 days ago 2305 reads 1 time favorited 6 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 3: Mobile workstation for bench tools Part 4 of Old and new Projects in a New Workshop series Part 5: Wall Mounted Tool Chest »

I, too, work in a 2-car garage. Minus the car, of course, although there is an awful lot of ‘stuff’ that hasn’t found it’s way into our home, yet (we just moved in a month ago). As with most woodworkers who find themselves working in these conditions, I have to deal with a sloping and somewhat uneven floor.

Most of the floor is flat, but the entry does slope more than I would prefer, and that is where my table saw and eventually my planer/jointer, will live. And my current table saw, a Skillsaw 10” contractor’s saw, is most definitely not my long-dreamt of machine. that one will cost a bit more than I can spend right now.

One must make do with what one has, don’t one?

That said, I needed an outfeed table behind the saw. That table has to cope with the sloping floor and the top has to be adjustable to suit the table on the saw; it has to be co-planer or just a cat hair below the top of the saw table. That meant the frame and the top had to be built separately, and the feet of the frame had to have adjustable static casters to ensure it sits firmly on the floor.

And the top of the outfeed table had to be adjustable to sit in the same plane as the saw table, so it had to float above the frame. Now, I’m no quantum physicist, but to me that meant securing the top of the table to the frame with four threaded rods, and giving myself room between the underside of the table top frame and the upper rails of the table frame.

The photos will show this much better than I can describe the solution I came up with:

I built the legs at 27” overall height and the three frames – 2 for the frame and 1 for the top in equal dimensions. In hindsight (often the worst sight of all) I would have made the top 3” wider in in both width and depth to extend over the lower frame, just for appearances sake.

The four bolts are 8’ carriage bolts, with the heads countersunk into the top of frame and locked into place by the table top. The hole through the upper frame and the upper rail on the lower frame are 3/8” dia to give a bot of slop in how the bolts line up in the lower frame.

Once it’s all put together, adjust the lower frame to suit the floor and then lower the top into place. I used masking tape to hold the washer in place below the two nuts on the blot as I lowered it onto the frame. Then it’s a few minutes of fiddling to get the outfeed table top to sit level with the table saw table. Actually about 1/16” below the saw table, just to make sure the stock feeds smoothly onto the outfeed table.

-- garyjs



6 comments so far

View Sarit's profile

Sarit

480 posts in 1766 days


#1 posted 1086 days ago

Is there a lot of wobble in the top?

View garyjs's profile

garyjs

27 posts in 1108 days


#2 posted 1086 days ago

None at all. I used 8” long by 5/16” dia carriage bolts, 2 on each side. If you wish you could use 12” by 3?8” dia bolts which would further reduce any chance of wobble and give you the option of adding a locking nut below the frame rail as well as the two nuts on the top of the frame rail. My problem with that is that I did not want to free-hand a 1/2” drill bit in my drill. You need that 1/16” clearance in the holes for the 5/16” bolt. Running a 1/2” bit in my hand drill seemed just a bit dangerous to me.

There is little or no sideways force applied to the table top, and this is a heavy piece of shop furniture. the legs are doubled up 2×4 pine, glued and screwed, and the frames are also 2×4. It ain’t pretty, but it is solid, adn that was the goal of the excersize.

-- garyjs

View Chipy's profile

Chipy

374 posts in 1219 days


#3 posted 1086 days ago

Did you sneak in your local bowling ally at night with a saw! .In all seriousness cool idea!

View garyjs's profile

garyjs

27 posts in 1108 days


#4 posted 1086 days ago

No, that painter’s quality lumber; 5/8” thickness x 11” width. It’s around $2.00 a linear foot at Ace Hardware. But honestly, bowling alley stock is available from Georgia Maple Block company. I think they’re in Conyers, Georgia. Years ago I built a European cabinet makers bench when I lived in Atlanta and ordered a 4” x 30” x 72” maple bench top from them. They don’t have a web site, but they are in the phone book. Can’t recall how much I paid, but it was incredibly reasonable at the time.

-- garyjs

View Sarit's profile

Sarit

480 posts in 1766 days


#5 posted 1086 days ago

Very interesting. I too need to build an outfeed table. Still contemplating if it should be the fold down type attached to the saw or an independent table.

View garyjs's profile

garyjs

27 posts in 1108 days


#6 posted 1086 days ago

I am very satisfied with the solutions I came up with for this table. It is as strong and as stable as I hoped for, and I have the flexibility needed to suit my next table saw, whatever it may be.

-- garyjs

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