LumberJocks

WoodWriting Haiku Thursday's --by RusticWoodArt #7: "Lacquer Wine"

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Blog entry by frank posted 01-24-2008 02:05 PM 906 reads 1 time favorited 7 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 6: "Wood Scupper" Part 7 of WoodWriting Haiku Thursday's --by RusticWoodArt series Part 8: "Woody Cellular Being" »

Lacquer Wine

....brushed with my desire,
rawness of umber inscribed,
wood and sheen complete
….
—by flp

——————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————-

One boxed bowl, covered with a god’s finish recipe….

....and so coming forth from the darkness into the light of a new day’s dawning….

....two coats of boiled linseed oil, one coat of olive oil, two applications of raw umber acrylic pigment, multiple coats of hand brushed lacquer, rubbed out between every two coats of lacquer with #oooo steel wool….

....the box bowl has been hand gouged and shaped out of hemlock wood and yes these are a favorite of mine, that I continue to do over the course of many years now. The actual working of the wood by hand is the easier part of this making, as the finish is very time consuming, but is the greatness of this wood piece for ‘wood art’....

This is relaxation and meditation in it’s purist form, plus it is herein that I draw from my inner being of strength and complete my circle of goodness….

Thank you.
GODSPEED,
Frank
RusticWoodArt

rusticwoodman@gmail.com
http://frank.wordpress.com/


”....work smart, work safe, and live, to work the wood….”

-- --frank, NH, http://rusticwoodart.tumblr.com/



7 comments so far

View Mark's profile

Mark

316 posts in 2879 days


#1 posted 01-24-2008 03:52 PM

Very nice finish. I’d never heard or though of using olive oil. What effect does the olive oil have on the wood?

Thanks.

Mark

-- Mark

View Todd A. Clippinger's profile

Todd A. Clippinger

8791 posts in 2845 days


#2 posted 01-24-2008 05:03 PM

Frank – When I think of you and your work the words meditation and relaxation are always foremost in my mind. Your life is a pure form of art.

-- Todd A. Clippinger, Montana, http://americancraftsmanworkshop.com

View frank's profile

frank

1492 posts in 2951 days


#3 posted 01-25-2008 02:36 PM

Hello all;
—-hi Mark; ....I’m very sorry, but I was just writing a long and detailed some-what answer to your question when I just lost every thing in my writing. I am out of time this morning, but will try and post again tomorrow morning after saving to my usual blog editor. My mistake was in writing in detail here, and not first of all writing//saving in a word editor.

—-thank you for your words Todd…..!

Thank you.
GODSPEED,
Frank

-- --frank, NH, http://rusticwoodart.tumblr.com/

View frank's profile

frank

1492 posts in 2951 days


#4 posted 01-26-2008 02:38 PM

—-hello Mark;

....well here I go again, this time I’ve decided to do a backup in my BlogDesk editor.

So you were asking; “I’d never heard or thought of using olive oil. What effect does the olive oil have on the wood?” Well I’m sure that when one talks of using olive oil around woodworkers, there will be much noise from both sides of the issue…..

....the opinions of those who quote their sources; say that oilive oil goes rancid over time and one should not use for eating utensils….

....and then those who have used it with no side effects.

I often think that if I was to pay attention to what every-one else is busily making noise about….I would never have time to get out to my shop and start working the wood and thinking outside the box. So many teachers out there, who are so adpt at giving expert advice on their opinions and then what about the ones who come along and do a copy and past of those opinions, till next thing you know, there is a rule of law that says; “this is how it needs to be done.”

I remember a woodworking article some years ago on wood finishes where the one doing the test and comparisons of various finishes had come out with a bad report on one major company that produced wood finishes. And yet if one was to read the way this ‘expert’ applied and tested this one finish….well, he didn’t even follow the directions on the can….duh. I have learned over time that it’s fine to listen and read the opinions of other’s, but I never…..did I say never, yes I did….”I never take any advice of what an other has said in woodworking as the final rule of law”. I all-ways test the opinions of those other’s and then I am able to come to a conclusion based on the results I have come up with.

And so with that in mind, I must also add that this means I will often exceed in the the area of accumulated time factors, but then it’s my time and I’ll use time for my benefit. Time was never meant to rule over us, where we become the slaves of time….never having enough. When one sees him//her-self as the master of time, then time is only a passing breath of wind which I ride for the benefit of my all. Now look whats went and happened, here I am talking about olive oil and the next thing I know is I’m over at the wellspring of time….”frannnkkkkkkk….Frank, get back on track.”

What I’m saying here is that if I listen to the debate of//about olive oil in contact with eating utensils, then I will get caught up there and proceed no-further in exploring olive oil and it’s use in woodworking. By the way, I just typed olive oil and it's use in woodworking into Dr. Google search and LumberJocks and this article I wrote, came up on the first page, second one down…..thank you google! Actually one could thank Martin for how well he has incorporated//integrated the use of ‘tags’ for our use in tagging these blogs for the search engines. I will jump off on a side comment here and mention that one of the fastest ways of getting yourself noticed in the search engines and ‘feeds’ is to blog stories. I know that this will go against what many will tell you when it comes to ‘websites’ vs ‘blogsites’, but the truth is in the numbers that search engines notice blogsites and stories more then websites. Why, well because of constant daily or more frequent ‘new content’ or updating….search engines just love new content and so they will pay special attention to those of us who know how to use ‘tags’ and are given to being frequent with new content.

....now getting back to olive oil. I often have learned to use olive oil in connection with other applications of oils and then have used it as the final coat or as in this piece, underneath the ongoing applications of sealers that I am applying. If one is concerned about the rancid smell of flavor, of olive oil over time, then after the initial application, rub out the wood with salt. Olive oil will harden in the wood, but if that is a concern then mix in a few drops of Japan Dryer along with cutting the oil some-what with gum turps or mineral spirits.

I use olive oil in pine, especially these hemlock box-bowls and have been very pleased with how the oil cures and adds a richness to the wood over time. Also I will wet sand the olive oil with #0000 steel wool, and for this I save previously used steel wool from other sandings. Being that the steel wool has already been used and corrupted with wood particles combined with the machine oil, used in the production of the steel wool….I am able to get a nice color of grey that now sands into the wood. This grey color will mix and stain, plus fill into the areas of the soft hemlock, highlighting between the grains of ‘early’ and ‘late’ wood growth. Some will say that olive oil needs to be applied every year again to the wood, but then I’ve also found that when only using any oil….tung, boiled linseed etc….one needs to re-apply over the course of time. I personally have never noticed the smell of oxidation, (rancid) in olive oil used my wood pieces. As to your question of what effect does olive oil have in the wood….I would just say that in my opinion, it highlights and compliments the wood and it’s grains, especially in the softwoods like hemlock.

Because I have decided to test different oils for and in woodworking I have also used motor oils, machine oils and chainsaw oils in woodworking and in the handles of my tools. Now having said all this….my favorite all time oil that I use in wood is tung oil….but then that would be an-other story.

Now in closing I just thought I would pass on the beautiful works of an-other who is turning wood bowls and using ‘olive oil’ as the wood finish….Lloyd's Wood Bowls.

Hope this helps some and,
Thank you.
GODSPEED,
Frank

-- --frank, NH, http://rusticwoodart.tumblr.com/

View Mark's profile

Mark

316 posts in 2879 days


#5 posted 01-28-2008 05:38 PM

Thanks Frank. I always enjoy your discourse and appreciate your thoughts and wealth of information. In past projects I have used either tung or boiled linseed oil on a specific project but never used multiple oils on the same project. I must do some experimenting to see if what, if any, variance there may be when utilizing a combination of oils.

Thanks again and enjoy your day.

Mark

-- Mark

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

18615 posts in 2906 days


#6 posted 01-29-2008 01:55 PM

re: rancid
rub with salt and then oil or the other way around?

-- ~ Debbie, Canada (https://www.facebook.com/DebbiePribeleENJOConsultant)

View frank's profile

frank

1492 posts in 2951 days


#7 posted 02-02-2008 01:30 PM

—-hi Debbie; ....”If one is concerned about the rancid smell of flavor, of olive oil over time, then after the initial application, rub out the wood with salt…..”

....”intial application”, of olive oil, (while the oil is still wet and on the wood) rub in the salt realllllllllllll goodddddddd and then wipe all down and place in your favorite curing place….......and forget about it for a while. The olive oil will in-deed harden and then one can proceed to whatever is their next step of the process.

Just remember, in the art of ‘finishing’ wood, no-thing is an overnight cure or finish. Just look at the wood and then look at one’s-elf in the mirror, I would dare to say that it has taken a life-time to get you//me//any of us well on the road to being cured and finished…..and then after all that time, I still run into a wall and have to start over again…..oh well, maybe I’ll learn now and be better prepared in my next life.

Thank you.
GODSPEED,
Frank

-- --frank, NH, http://rusticwoodart.tumblr.com/

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