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WoodWriting Haiku Thursday's --by RusticWoodArt #1: "Workin' Wood at Haiku"

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Blog entry by frank posted 12-05-2007 05:05 PM 862 reads 0 times favorited 5 comments Add to Favorites Watch
no previous part Part 1 of WoodWriting Haiku Thursday's --by RusticWoodArt series Part 2: "Point of Evanesce" »

Workin’ Wood at Haiku

....the last snow-flake falls,
box of wood splays my beauty,
pedals blow grace-full
….
—-by flp

From where I’m coming from….it’s all-ready written in the wood….

Thank you.
GODSPEED,
Frank
RusticWoodArt

rusticwoodman@gmail.com
http://frank.wordpress.com/


”....work smart, work safe, and live, to work the wood….”

-- --frank, NH, http://rusticwoodart.tumblr.com/



5 comments so far

View Bob Babcock's profile

Bob Babcock

1804 posts in 2737 days


#1 posted 12-05-2007 05:30 PM

A worker of wood
A poet of the forest
Sharing his ideas

Happy Wednesday Frank!

-- Bob, Carver Massachusetts, Sawdust Maker http://www.capecodbaychallenge.org

View frank's profile

frank

1492 posts in 2857 days


#2 posted 12-05-2007 05:56 PM

—-thank you Bob;

....me-thinks you have some of that poetry in your heart!

Have a GODSPEED Wednesday Bob!
Thank you.
Frank

-- --frank, NH, http://rusticwoodart.tumblr.com/

View Ethan Sincox's profile

Ethan Sincox

765 posts in 2825 days


#3 posted 12-05-2007 06:38 PM

The first snowflake falls
A carpet of leaves abide
Winter has arrived
—eas

I do love a good haiku… or three.

-- Ethan, http://thekiltedwoodworker.com

View frank's profile

frank

1492 posts in 2857 days


#4 posted 12-06-2007 01:13 PM

—-so yes, this is just great and I am honored to have acquired the acquisition of such noble poets of the ‘haiku’ as Bob and Ethan!

I have been practicing writing haiku, (which is a Japanese form of poetry) for some years now and find it a relaxing way to write.

For those who may have not studied haiku here are some simple form structures that can be followed:

Form: ”Traditional Japanese haiku have seventeen syllables divided into three lines of five syllables, seven syllables, and five syllables respectively. These syllable counts are often ignored when haiku are written in other languages, but the basic form of three short lines, with the middle line slightly longer than the other two, is usually observed.

Structure: ”Haiku divide into two parts, with a break coming after the first or second line, so that the poem seems to make two separate statements that are related in some unexpected or indirect way. In Japanese, this break is marked by what haiku poets call a “cutting word.” In English and other languages, the break is often marked by punctuation. This two-part structure is important to the poetic effect of a haiku, prompting a sense of discovery as one reads or a feeling of sudden insight.

Language: ”Haiku should include what Japanese poets call a kigo—a word that gives the reader a clue to the season being described. The kigo can be the name of a season (autumn, winter) or a subtler clue, such as a reference to the harvest or new fallen snow. Through the years, certain signs of the seasons have become conventional in Japanese haiku: cherry blossoms are a kigo for spring, mosquitoes a kigo for summer. Sometimes, too, the kigo will refer to an individual moment in the natural cycle, such as dawn or moonrise, without reference to a particular season. The kigo is also important to the haiku’s effect, anchoring the experience it describes in a poetic here and now that helps sharpen the imaginative focus.

Subject: ”Haiku present a snapshot of everyday experience, revealing an unsuspected significance in a detail of nature or human life. Haiku poets find their subject matter in the world around them, not in ancient legends or exotic fantasies. They write for a popular audience and give their audience a new way to look at things they have probably overlooked in the past.
Can You Haiku?

So if any-others would like to add on….you are welcome!

Thank you.
GODSPEED,
Frank

-- --frank, NH, http://rusticwoodart.tumblr.com/

View Ethan Sincox's profile

Ethan Sincox

765 posts in 2825 days


#5 posted 12-06-2007 06:06 PM

Great information, Frank. I need to practice my haiku writing; I also need to refocus a part of my life back to writing, as I seem to have neglected it as of late. Thanks for the motivation!

Several years ago I used to belong to a “Daily Haiku” contest online somewhere… The winners were posted daily and the subject for the next day’s haiku would always be an image. I believe they chose seven winning entries at random because of the sheer volume.

I should try to find that site again; it was a lot of fun.

-- Ethan, http://thekiltedwoodworker.com

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