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"Old Growth and Farm Living" --by RusticWoodArt

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Blog entry by frank posted 09-20-2007 02:25 PM 583 reads 0 times favorited 10 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Old Growth and Farm Living

....well I mean what can I say, farm living is working and selling, while finding time to look for some old growth//ancient ones and then workin’ at slabbin’ some tree blanks….

A little artistic enhancement added to an old growth mailbox….

....no Home Depot mailbox holder stand here. Cut this one out of the woods some years ago, left the bark on and planted the trunk in the ground. No-more veggies for sale though, berries are past their prime and what remains is sitting in the freezer with the veggies or in the form of canned fruits, veggies, jams and jellies. We do though, have jams and jellies for sale! I will have to write a blog story on this at some time….in short, we have our winter supply of food in and so we are happy and self sufficient. Oh yes, I forgot to mention the cabbage, chard and brussel sprouts still growing and will be yet around till around November – December….the brussel sprouts are my favorite….

....and what would a blog of mine be, without some color to add a spirit of creativity….color is part of the feathers that complete the wings of imagination….did you know that? So what we have here is more than maybe your eye can see, in the shadows there at the bottom and on top of the concrete well top, a moose skull….

....and so I ended up out here yester day in the afternoon till dusk, slabbin’ some maple that was givin’ to me. And yes then as I looked up, I saw that one much older then I, was also doing some watching over me….

....the base of this old pine at 51’’ up is roughly 4’ across and 126’’ around….I do believe this one outranks me….

....here are two slabs of maple, 18’’ – 20’’ across and 52’’ in length….3’’ – 4’’ in thickness. I will post some more slabs as I spent the afternoon cutting some more, in a future blog story. These are all cut free hand and I will write about how I do this soon….

Thank you.
GODSPEED,
Frank
RusticWoodArt

rusticwoodman@gmail.com
http://frank.wordpress.com/


”....’working hard’ and ‘hardly working’, are my best of friends, as my days are filled with the aroma of wood, while in my mind the ‘wood art’ of imagination is taking shape….”

-- --frank, NH, http://rusticwoodart.tumblr.com/



10 comments so far

View Thos. Angle's profile

Thos. Angle

4435 posts in 2615 days


#1 posted 09-20-2007 02:33 PM

I don’t know, Frank, brussels sprouts are your favorite? That slab on the right is really going to be something special. Fall is a time to look back and forward.

-- Thos. Angle, Jordan Valley, Oregon

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

18615 posts in 2813 days


#2 posted 09-20-2007 02:37 PM

you take us on the most wonderful of journeys:)

do you keep the cabbage over winter? and how?
and … how do you keep the worms off the brussel sprouts?

yummy .. brussel sprouts: slice them up, boil them for a bit, and then put them in a pan of olive oil and Ms. Dash seasoning.. and a little extra garlic.. oh yah :) Of course, I’m the only one in the family who likes this, so it is often served as my lunch :)

-- ~ Debbie, Canada (https://www.facebook.com/DebbiePribeleENJOConsultant)

View frank's profile

frank

1492 posts in 2858 days


#3 posted 09-20-2007 02:46 PM

Hi Thos.;
—-just getting ready to leave when I saw your comment, thanks….

Actually yes they are, but then you must also come to know that I’m a vegetarian and so I eat a lot of green vegtables. As far as fall, well this time of year is a busy time for me, I don’t get much opportunity for lookin’ back as my eyes are busy lookin’ at what is coming….the cold and winter snows can really lock me out of having time to do anything, except keep gathering wood nuts. We have three wood stoves here and keeping those bellies full in the winter, is and can be full time work. Take care as I know the snows are coming your way also and,

Thank you.
GODSPEED,
Frank

-- --frank, NH, http://rusticwoodart.tumblr.com/

View frank's profile

frank

1492 posts in 2858 days


#4 posted 09-20-2007 02:58 PM

Hi Debbie;
—-journeys are wonder-full….yes in-deed….

As to the cabbage, we hang it in the cellar from the floor joists….and then the brussel sprouts, yeesssss! I eat them raw, cooked and then we freeze them and store in the freezer….our gardens, (berries and veggies) are all totally organic and to tell the truth, we’ve not had much problems with worms….but then I also give thanks. Being a vegetarian my only eating of meat may be those worms….lots of protein there.

The brussel sprouts are great in curry dishes, I cook a lot of Indian and Asian dishes with much curry and hot peppers….actually this is what I usually eat for breakfast….now go and figure that one out….

Thank you.
GODSPEED,
Frank

-- --frank, NH, http://rusticwoodart.tumblr.com/

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

18615 posts in 2813 days


#5 posted 09-20-2007 03:29 PM

it all makes sense—- you’re FRANK :) lol

-- ~ Debbie, Canada (https://www.facebook.com/DebbiePribeleENJOConsultant)

View RobS's profile

RobS

1334 posts in 2959 days


#6 posted 09-20-2007 04:27 PM

Ah come on Thos., we’ve got to give that slab on the left some love too, they are all bound for something special in the hands of their current owner…..

Frank, funny you should post your mailbox, I also have a non-store-bought version from my back yard..I’ll have to post that soon…

I also look forward to your freehand slabbing technique blog, I have some logs in mind for that…..

and what’s that, the new breakfast of champions? Can’t say I would have ever guessed that, whatever keeps you going…...

As always, thanks for the post and pictures….

-- Rob (A) Waxahachie,TX

View 's profile

593 posts in 2624 days


#7 posted 09-20-2007 04:39 PM

Nice place you are blessed to live in, Frank.

Please do tell us more. I’d like to know who do you cut them freehand. I was taught how to do 1” slabs like those by a friend who is a loghouse builder in Vancouver Island (BC) using only a huge chainsaw.

From one of the last pictures it seems that you do it sawing vertically, in a ”classic” way… Interesting because the way I was told is the opposite. Look at the picture on my profile, I’m just doing so.

In any case, keep feeding us with your special vision of the world. Your eyes see beyond what most of ours do.

View frank's profile

frank

1492 posts in 2858 days


#8 posted 09-21-2007 02:58 AM

—-also….
—-hi Rob; looking forward to that mailbox post….Hmmm, mailbox post//mailbox post story….oh well….
Also, ”whatever keeps you going……?” Hot peppers, Indian curry, rice and beans with veggies for breakfast along with plenty of tofu and peanut butter sandwiches….and then when I get out in the woods, imagination kicks in and I’m off….

—-hi Jojo; yes I have all-ready noticed the picture on your profile, matter of fact that was the first thing I noticed, is that you were freehanding with a chainsaw. Also you are right and in my opinion, this freehanding is and as far as I’m concerned….can only be done by a good size, big HorsePower chainsaw. Otherwise it gets to be too dangerous due to kickback and the chance of stall out. Also one will burn the small ones out, and if you are really going to be slabbin’ for long, then also there’s the matter of hardwood and softwood and the different angles of degrees for those cuts. Many will also overbore the cylinder and go for increased size of intake//exhaust ports….so that when the saw is engaged with the wood, large chips are flying. I can tell how sharp my chain is by the size of chips laying on the ground. Also one interesting side point, is the time it takes to sharpen and file my rakers, if I’m out in the woods and need to freshen up my chains say on a 36’’ bar.

As far as to cutting in the vertical, yes that is how these were cut….but on that point I’m stopping since I will make a blog story on this.

Thank you.
GODSPEED,
Frank

-- --frank, NH, http://rusticwoodart.tumblr.com/

View 's profile

593 posts in 2624 days


#9 posted 09-22-2007 02:52 AM

Very interesting Frank.

I’m by no means, an expert in chainsaws, even less in freehanding with them but I was working under the close supervision of a friend who is a loghouse builder in the facility and with their professional tools. It’s amazing how such a small guy (he’s yout typical 110 lb japanese) could handle the biggest baddest boys weighting dozens of pounds with such ease.

On the other hand -and not at all that it needed to be enforced- he insisted in that I wasn’t gonna approach even the smallest saw without the thick protection “apron” (as a matter of fact, a sort of half-front pants whose name I can’t seem to remember now), security googles and ear protection.

Unfortunately we are no cats and have only one short live to live.

View frank's profile

frank

1492 posts in 2858 days


#10 posted 09-22-2007 04:27 PM

Hi Jojo;
—-well as to ‘interesting’ and all that follows after that word….thanks!

When you mention this gentleman, who was small in stature according to body volume, but exceedingly large in capacity of wisdom, I can only realize that here is one who knew//knows the true meaning of safety….safety goggles, hard hat, ear protection and those half-front pants (chaps). Funny thing about ear protection, nowadays, one can buy ear protection with a sound system included. And yes I own a pair for when I am out weed whacking or mowing, but for working in the woods no-way….since safety in the woods is all about being in tune with you surroundings. Yes, even with the ear protection in place, (but no-sound system included) I can still hear the chainsaw motor rpm, how the cut is going and if some one is spotting for me, I can also hear their yell. Common sense goes a long ways in the woods, so that one may walk out of those woods at the end of the day, on their own common legs.

Where you mention that this friend off yours ”could handle the biggest baddest boys weighting dozens of pounds with such ease,” I also know where he’s coming from. So often we look at a person and judge their ability by their size, hence we can equate a ‘real he-man’ according to his size or brute strength. While the truth is that sometimes brute strength lacks volumes of wisdom between their ears. In learning to ‘work smart’, I have developed or coined a phrase that I use quite often….’Working Hard or Hardly Working’. So the many will hear this and usually think that I’m talking silly or having a day of play. What I am really saying is, I have learned to let the object I am working with, work for me. Yes, I can still carry good size logs and timbers….and that is brute strength, I can still heft those beasts of machines around and that is brute strength, however I am also getting older now and I am losing my ego that all-ways wanted to impress, plus brute strength ask for payback at the end of the day in aches and pains.

I have learned that I don’t need to ‘work hard’ if I know how to ‘hardly work’ and I can actually get more work done….that is ’working smart’!

Thank you.
GODSPEED,
Frank

-- --frank, NH, http://rusticwoodart.tumblr.com/

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