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Woodworking Knowledge #4: Creating a powered, positive pressure, filtered air-mask

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Blog entry by flink posted 04-30-2008 05:54 PM 3576 reads 0 times favorited 5 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 3: Etching Brasswork from Using Photocopies of Anything! Part 4 of Woodworking Knowledge series Part 5: Woodworking, DIY video rentals »

Like many of you, I’ve looked at the Trend and Triton powered air masks. And like many of you, I decided to make do without one because they are fairly pricey.

Well, today in my travels I found a link from a steampunk site (yes, my old hp laptop is going to become wood-clad and steam driven very soon) for a DIY powered mask.

This is another Jake Von Slatt project. He used a car air filter, though I think I am going to use a cabin air filter since almost all of them are HEPA rated now.

-- Made lots of sawdust and pounded some nails. Haven't finished anything, though.



5 comments so far

View GaryK's profile

GaryK

10262 posts in 2742 days


#1 posted 04-30-2008 06:02 PM

I tried the Trend and found it too clunky so I can imagine that Triron is worse.

I got this for about 1/4 the price and it works great:

http://lumberjocks.com/reviews/245

-- Gary - Never pass up the opportunity to make a mistake look like you planned it that way - Tyler, TX

View flink's profile

flink

94 posts in 2474 days


#2 posted 04-30-2008 06:10 PM

The triton is monstrous. It is way too much for most people to wear.

-- Made lots of sawdust and pounded some nails. Haven't finished anything, though.

View FlWoodRat's profile

FlWoodRat

732 posts in 2663 days


#3 posted 04-30-2008 06:58 PM

Flink,
I’d be real careful when constructing a HOME MADE respiratory protective device, expecially if you plan to use compressed air for breathing. Obviously for home use, the NIOSH regulations do not apply. None the less, commercial positive pressure (supplied air) respirators are designed and constructed to a STANDARD that, if used properly, ensures the worker is protected from airborne contaminants. Yes, your cabin ‘air filter’ may remove micron sized particulate matter. Commercial particulate cartridges are designed to remove SUB micron particles. Keep in mind, if you are using compressed air, you should check it to verify that it is free of hydrocarbons, moisture, etc. If you use it for extended periods of time, you may want to evaluate the use of an in-line Carbon Monoxide monitor as well. Good luck to you and your lungs.

Bruce

-- I love the smell of sawdust in the morning....

View flink's profile

flink

94 posts in 2474 days


#4 posted 05-01-2008 12:31 AM

Hi FLWoodRat,

It keeps positive pressure using a little fan to draw air through the HEPA filter. Did you stop reading when you got to the guy’s canned air system system? That’s a commercial system he uses for painting

The HEPA filters are sub-micron. The cabin air filters are the ones that filter air inside a car’s HVAC ducts.

I have plenty of bottled gas experience. It’d be fun to do one, but way too expensive for a day of turning ;-)

-- Made lots of sawdust and pounded some nails. Haven't finished anything, though.

View FlWoodRat's profile

FlWoodRat

732 posts in 2663 days


#5 posted 05-01-2008 12:50 AM

Flink, i did not read the entire article…forgive my caution as I have spent 30 plus years working in a industrial health related job and cringe at ‘adaptations’ that sound great, and may be more than adequate, but are not tested and certified. Good luck and thanks for the response. Have a great and safe day.

-- I love the smell of sawdust in the morning....

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