LumberJocks

Building For The Wife #7: Strip veneering kitchen cabinet doors.

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by fatman51 posted 09-25-2015 09:48 AM 1340 reads 0 times favorited 6 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 6: Kitchen peg board for utensils. Part 7 of Building For The Wife series Part 8: Quick knot inlay, because the basketballs got bounced »

I wanted to take a picture of my wife’s new kitchen bureau, spice rack, and utensil hanger so that I colud post the finished work here on my blog. I wanted people to see what I was talking about. When she caught me taking pictures of her kitchen, however, my wife stopped me. She refused to let me post pictures that included the crummy cabinets above the counter. At the very least, she wanted to replace the forty five year old formica veneered cabinet doors. Wanting both to please my wife and post the pictures of my work, I began working on a plan.

I could have made new doors and a face frame, but it was four in the afternoon, and I wanted to get the job done by bedtime. Paint was an option, and I did do some painting, but the wife wanted to match her knotty pine motif. To build doors out of knotty pine, like she wanted, would have required me to sort through my lumber looking for suitable pieces to build with, checking the grain so that I could pick the right pieces and arrange them such that they would not warp. I decided to pull off the old doors and while my wife painted the face frame white, it was tope, I went to work.

I jointed, table sawed, planed, re-sawed, planed and re-sawed until I had a pile of veneer strips. I am calling it all knotty pine but the wood I used included, four kinds of pine, douglas fir, hemlock(the West Coast variety), and spruce.

Next, I sanded the back side of the doors clean. I intended to contact cement the veneer strips to this side and sand the formica clean on the fronts, so that I could spray them white with oil based enamel. Once the doors were prepared, I began the veneering process. I used a fast setting flammable contact cement.

I wanted to be sure that the strips adhered so I pressed them until I was ready to go to the next step.

Because some of the strips were uneven, I placed a mat over the top, then plywood, then my $500 press. One at a time, I trimmed, planed and sanded my new door fronts.

Here, I should point out that it is not wise to run knotty pine veneered doors thru my planer.

I didn’t get a picture of the basket balls but they were paint grade. I generally try to replace a knot with a knot.

When I was done fixing the blown out knots with strips, fill putty, or basket balls, I finish sanded and gave them a quick coat of poly, I ate a salad with a piece of cornbread before I turned them over and sprayed the sanded formica white, it was originally a dark walnut color. I ate a piece of peach cobbler before I installed the hinges.

I made a new top rail to go above the doors then put my wife’s kitchen back together. Now I was ready to take pictures.

I have to give my wife credit, her utensil pegboard was a good idea. At some point, I will do something about that light cord.

.

-- The Constitution only gives people the right to pursue happiness. You have to catch it yourself. Benjamin Franklin



6 comments so far

View Tugboater78's profile

Tugboater78

2450 posts in 1659 days


#1 posted 09-25-2015 02:18 PM

That’s pretty neat, I am currently in a full rehab of our kitchen. Stripped the place down to studs, ran new electrical and everything new as I have rebuilt. In process of building upper cabs, fiance wants a milkpaint/distressed look, my doors and drawer faces will be distressed oak while cabinet frames and panels will be a blue milk paint look.

-- "....put that handsaw to work and make it earn its keep. - summerfi" <==< JuStiN >==>=->

View fatman51's profile

fatman51

335 posts in 1304 days


#2 posted 09-25-2015 03:39 PM

Thanks. Sounds like a fun project. I hope you post some pictures.

-- The Constitution only gives people the right to pursue happiness. You have to catch it yourself. Benjamin Franklin

View Mark Wilson's profile

Mark Wilson

1765 posts in 531 days


#3 posted 09-25-2015 05:30 PM

All I can see is the cord. I’m kidding. “She refused to let me post pictures that included the crummy cabinets above the counter.” I chuckled, thinking, Now he’s gonna reface the cabinets. That thought was kidding, too. But then, it got more ridiculous. He did it before bedtime! You’re some kind of machine. A very efficient machine. What’s it like to be so competent? Now I’m not kidding.

-- Mark

View fivecodys's profile

fivecodys

582 posts in 1104 days


#4 posted 09-25-2015 09:54 PM

I really like it. The color of the wood is perfect. Way too nice to cover with paint!

-- Chem, Central California

View fatman51's profile

fatman51

335 posts in 1304 days


#5 posted 09-25-2015 11:03 PM

Thanks again for the encouraging words. Many, many, bandages and messes ago, I was completely incompetent. Mark, I would say that I am more of a tool than a machine, but we did a lot of that kind of thing in my father’s shop. It used to be fairly common to re veneer or veneer over existing stuff. It is still generally more efficient. I decided to do it and five hours, 3 boards, a couple of ounces of paint, glue, and poly, and it was done. I would have been at it for ten hours if I was using exotic lumber, because I would have been a lot more careful and more discriminating. Of course, the project got another hour out of me today, because we did not like the basket balls.

-- The Constitution only gives people the right to pursue happiness. You have to catch it yourself. Benjamin Franklin

View fatman51's profile

fatman51

335 posts in 1304 days


#6 posted 10-02-2015 02:46 AM

By the way, Chem, thank you and I am VERY glad that my wife liked her doors well enough not to paint them!

-- The Constitution only gives people the right to pursue happiness. You have to catch it yourself. Benjamin Franklin

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com