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Building a wall hanging tool cabinet #2: Tool cabinet #2

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Blog entry by exelectrician posted 10-03-2014 05:25 AM 2217 reads 0 times favorited 6 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 1: Building a wall hanging tool cabinet #1 Part 2 of Building a wall hanging tool cabinet series Part 3: Tool cabinet #3 »

With the door frames mitered and dove tailed I used my raised panel bits to make a frame. I wanted a deep stile on the top and bottom to resist sagging of the doors with all the tools in them.
The less than perfect cherry I got dirt cheap came with knots, and one was right where I did not want it, what to do?
I decided to try and do a curved top cutting out the offending knot, not really knowing how this adventure was going to turn out. Whew!! all okay. Bear in mind this is the second and third raised panel door I have made. Always trying new things, I decided to mask off the edge of the door frame and stain the edge with two coats, just to add something. Then I brushed on a coat of Deft clear semi gloss in the channel and on the edge of the raised panel to seal the wood.

Here there are wedges of masking tape to show me where to center the biscuit machine, so much easier to pull the tape off than trying to get pencil marks out of the wood, another first for me.

You can never have too many clamps!

The front panels were made 1/16” oversize all around so I could trim it back to an exact fit, I originally wanted to flush trim this job with my router, come to find out that my flush trim bit is 1/2” long?? rather than go out and spend more money, I sharpened my trusty No 5 Bailey and got to work!

-- Love thy neighbour as thyself



6 comments so far

View Notw's profile

Notw

467 posts in 1214 days


#1 posted 10-03-2014 03:37 PM

Looking forward to seeing this finished, Looking good so far

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

13713 posts in 2079 days


#2 posted 10-04-2014 12:40 PM

Ah, good call on the jack plane! Cabinet looking great.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

View Belg1960's profile

Belg1960

966 posts in 2526 days


#3 posted 10-04-2014 03:46 PM

If the sides were 1/8” bigger for true up didn’t that create a problem when doing the layout and cutting of the biscuit slots?? As I imagine it wasn’t exactly 1/8 everywhere? Really like the project.

-- ***Pat*** Rookie woodworker looking for an education!!!

View exelectrician's profile

exelectrician

2327 posts in 1888 days


#4 posted 10-04-2014 09:55 PM

@Belg, yes when I first started using biscuits I was always using the fence to adjust the distance – I tossed the fence! Now all I use is the machine flat on the bench, and I use spacers, to get any offset I need, sometimes a piece of ply, but in this case I dialed in the distance with a yellow legal pad of pages. Works very well for me.

-- Love thy neighbour as thyself

View Belg1960's profile

Belg1960

966 posts in 2526 days


#5 posted 10-05-2014 01:45 PM

Thanks so much for the reply. I just watched a You Tube explaining the use of the shims and face of the tool to reference, the reveal of the face frame has to then be very consistent for this to work. I’m not following how you use the legal pad as shims? Is it done in steps referencing off one flush end?? Sorry just not seeing the big picture.

-- ***Pat*** Rookie woodworker looking for an education!!!

View exelectrician's profile

exelectrician

2327 posts in 1888 days


#6 posted 10-05-2014 07:17 PM

Hi Belg this is for you

I cut the slots on the case edges referenced off my bench like the photo above, then measuring 125 thou = 1/8” of pages I placed the machine on top of the pages like this to cut the face frame slots 1/8” away from the edge

put them together with a biscuit ta-dah! 1/8” offset.

-- Love thy neighbour as thyself

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