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vintage craftsman tablesaw restoration #2: a new base to stand on

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Blog entry by emart posted 07-14-2013 03:52 AM 2495 reads 1 time favorited 7 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 1: dragging home my impulse buy Part 2 of vintage craftsman tablesaw restoration series no next part

After spending way too long on this I have a new stand for my tablesaw to replace the old one which essentially died in the middle of my hallway. Because my cobblestone patio is so rough I put the hardware from a garden wagon on the stand and widened the wheelbase a bit to make the saw less wobbly when it is being moved. to keep the saw from moving when in use I added some self leveling outrigger legs which block the wheels from turning and make it rock steady. I am already thinking of ways to improve my design such as enclosing the base and adding a storage box for my outriggers and a wrench to install them. Any other add-ons will have to wait until I have more money I can put into this old saw.

As for the machine itself it seems to be in decent shape once I put one of my spare blades in and the saw was cutting pretty cleanly. There is some arbor wobble but that can easily be dressed with a honing stone shown here: next up on my list is making some quick remove tables extensions for the saw and a cross cutting sled and other jigs and fixtures I could never use on my worthless firestorm (if I could get away with it I’d turn that saw into a boat anchor)

Anyways now for pictures:

just as a comparison here is the old stand that was on the saw when i bought it:
when i bought the saw the wheels had essentially crumbled into dust and the stand looked hideous with its crackling paint and general disrepair. once i put new casters on the stand the mounts bent from the shear weight of the saw(im pretty sure it weighs more than me) I may have use for it though as a welding table for my yard i just have to add a metal top to it and sand some of that ugly paint off

-- tools are only as good as the hands that hold them https://www.custommade.com/by/emeraldcrafts/



7 comments so far

View NormG's profile

NormG

4909 posts in 1910 days


#1 posted 07-14-2013 04:01 AM

Wonderful design, makes it very transportable

-- Norman

View Dror's profile

Dror

26 posts in 325 days


#2 posted 11-22-2014 04:26 PM

Hi

Looks like I purchased the same saw with the exact same fence – I am waiting for the saw to arrive.

What do you think about the fence after using it? Did you replace it?

thanks!

View emart's profile

emart

368 posts in 1534 days


#3 posted 11-22-2014 08:45 PM

The micro adjust fence works ok. i wound up keeping it because there really isnt any small fences on the market that I thought were worth buying. The adjuster knob works well and is easy to move in and out. The main problem I had was the spring on my fence is broken and I had to make some adjustments to get it to within 1/32”. It could probably be more accurate but it would likely need a new spring to be more accurate.

-- tools are only as good as the hands that hold them https://www.custommade.com/by/emeraldcrafts/

View Paul Bucalo's profile

Paul Bucalo

289 posts in 266 days


#4 posted 12-04-2014 12:17 PM

I’m intrigued by your choice of wheels, steering and leveling method. I have a similar issue with the unevenness of the dungeon workshop floor. A simpler spin of your idea may just be the answer I have been looking for. Thanks.

Over a year ago I made the mistake of buying a Skilsaw 3410-02 table saw at a nearby Lowe’s. Total piece of crap, but all I could afford. I spent a lot of time reworking the thin cast aluminum top, strengthening and realigning the fence clamping mechanism, removing the ridiculous proprietary and useless miter slot tabs…if I had another saw that worked better I would have sold it off and be done with it. I still have more to do on it. One thing I have learned: don’t buy a table saw that isn’t belt driven. A big difference in arbor accuracy and noise level.

And finally, I love the 50s look of the hardware. :)

-- The Original Technoslick - still fixing what ain't broke

View emart's profile

emart

368 posts in 1534 days


#5 posted 12-05-2014 12:42 AM

Yeah those $100 home improvement store saws are terrible. I have a black and decker firestorm table saw and it was downright dangerous. The fence could be up to 1/2 an inch off and the stand/wheels were so rickety it was liable to fall over every time I used it.

When on a limited budget the used market is very helpful since I only paid $150 for my saw. In fact most of my vintage tools cost $150 or less. The only downside is it isn’t very portable since it weighs a ton and if you drag the saw onto a steep slope it will flip upside down like turtle.

-- tools are only as good as the hands that hold them https://www.custommade.com/by/emeraldcrafts/

View Paul Bucalo's profile

Paul Bucalo

289 posts in 266 days


#6 posted 12-05-2014 01:06 AM

I had an opportunity this past fall to buy from a recent widow her late husband’s Delta Hybrid table saw for $95.00. The cast iron top had a thin layer of surface rust and it needed a good cleaning, but otherwise was in good operating condition. I couldn’t believe how quiet the motor started up the belt-driven blade and how smooth it ran. I chickened out for two reasons. The first was I had no way to get it home. It was too big and way too heavy to get into my SUV. Second, I knew there was no way to get it down into the dungeon. A few days later I called the widow back to see if she sold it, hoping for a second chance, still not knowing if I could get it home. It has sold the day after I turned her down. I still kick myself for not buying the saw and then worrying about how to get it home.

-- The Original Technoslick - still fixing what ain't broke

View emart's profile

emart

368 posts in 1534 days


#7 posted 12-05-2014 05:51 AM

A small saw like mine will easily fit in your SUV. It fit in the trunk of my ford contour. Throw some extension wings and a receiving table and its not too far off from a full size saw. Obviously the bigger matter is finding one.

-- tools are only as good as the hands that hold them https://www.custommade.com/by/emeraldcrafts/

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