LumberJocks

My workshop continued

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by electricalD posted 11-01-2011 10:37 PM 4497 reads 0 times favorited 25 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Hello everyone, Back in July I posted a blog on my workshop and in it I showed the ground breaking to the concrete pour of the floor. As promised I have now gotten to the next stage which is the “shelled in” phase. I am pleased with it. Again it is 22’ X 26’ with a barn style roof which gives me an extra level. The ceiling is 9’ and I am glad I went that route instead of the normal 8’. Here are the pictures. I hope you like them as much as I enjoyed building it. I have stairs inside to the second level and, have a look at the hearth for my woodstove. The guy who helped me, came up with this idea. Its 5 lengths of 2 X 6 with 3 layers of 1/2” plywood on top. Then the cermamic tile on top. I plan to put a sheet metal heat deflection shield on the back and on top of it that will be spaced 1/2” from the drywall. I am in the process of doing the electrical myself (my trade) and when I am finished I will lay out the details for it. I hope you like it and it was a lot of hard work as you know. What do you think?

Best Regards,
Dan P.

-- If there were no God, there would be no atheists, G. K. Chesterton



25 comments so far

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5387 posts in 1983 days


#1 posted 11-01-2011 10:55 PM

Looks good…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View MoshupTrail's profile

MoshupTrail

299 posts in 1232 days


#2 posted 11-01-2011 11:37 PM

Dan -
Looks great! One thing you’ve done well: the stove. You’ll have plenty of fuel for it and you’ll really appreciate the warmth. On the electrical: You cannot have too many plugs. Put them every 3 feet and alternate circuits so two adjacent plugs are not on the same breaker. Then go around again with two or more circuits of 220. Any big tool you buy now seems to have the 220v option. You’ll thank me later :)

-- Some problems are best solved with an optimistic approach. Optimism shines a light on alternatives that are otherwise not visible.

View Mark E.'s profile

Mark E.

384 posts in 2493 days


#3 posted 11-01-2011 11:51 PM

Very nice. Lot’s of room in there. Take advantage of that extra space in the kneewall on the second level.

-- Mark

View jusfine's profile

jusfine

2280 posts in 1677 days


#4 posted 11-02-2011 12:52 AM

Looks great! Mine is in the loft of my barn too, although mine is over 67 years old!

If I was building new, I would have made the ceiling at least 10’ for clearance (mine is 12’).

-- Randy "You are judged as much by the questions you ask as the answers you give..."

View degoose's profile

degoose

7052 posts in 2105 days


#5 posted 11-02-2011 01:02 AM

Great looking shop….

-- Drink twice... and don't bother to cut... @ lazylarrywoodworks.com.au For lovers of all things timber...

View Michael1's profile

Michael1

403 posts in 1411 days


#6 posted 11-02-2011 01:50 AM

Great looking shop!!! It is exciting to build a new shop from scratch. I am sure you will have many pleasurable hours in it once you are completed and moved in. Makes me envious

-- Michael Mills, North Carolina, http://www.scicaskets.com

View live4ever's profile

live4ever

983 posts in 1761 days


#7 posted 11-02-2011 01:57 AM

Looks fantastic! Would you be able to provide an estimate as to how much it has cost so far?

-- Optimists are usually disappointed. Pessimists are either right or pleasantly surprised. I tend to be a disappointed pessimist.

View David Grimes's profile

David Grimes

2072 posts in 1391 days


#8 posted 11-02-2011 01:57 AM

Now that is a good looking shop. Looks well thought out. Enjoy.

-- If you're going to stir the pot, think BIG spoon or SMALL boat paddle. David Grimes, Georgia

View DamnYankee's profile

DamnYankee

3240 posts in 1313 days


#9 posted 11-02-2011 03:14 AM

Nice shop. No matter how big we make them, and no matter how much space we seem to have in them when we first start moving in they always get small in the end.

As said above, once you think you’ve put in enough electrical, go back and double it.

-- Shameless - Winner of two Stumpy Nubs Awards

View GaryD's profile

GaryD

621 posts in 2120 days


#10 posted 11-02-2011 04:10 AM

Very nice, like the stove…. I am like the rest there will come a time when you will say you should have built it bigger. Well done though, you will enjoy it.

-- Gary, Little River,SC I've Learned that the Lord didn't do it all in one day and neither can I

View doordude's profile

doordude

1085 posts in 1734 days


#11 posted 11-02-2011 05:39 AM

Dan, the shop looks great. love the style and the heating system. what about cooling? might as well put that in too while your at it. it will be great fun setting up your shop,keep us all posted. four gang plugs mid wall, down low and a few up high. can never tell where you might need to plug in. what about a plug strip in front edge of the bench? i regret not doing it on mine.

View electricalD's profile

electricalD

116 posts in 1860 days


#12 posted 11-02-2011 07:23 AM

Hello Guys, The cost to date is about $30,000 Canadian. The electrical I have given much thought to and I will disclose that later. But I have given much thought to future tools as well. I know what I am putting in there so there will be plenty of room for the power. It is as big as I could go with the municipal regulations which governed the square footage as well as the height. So I couldn’t go any bigger in the square footage or higher because of that. The plugs I have allowed for and have given alot into what I want as well as what might come up in future days. I’ll disclose all that in due time and I am sure you will all agree with my plans. For now it’s the wiring, then vapour barrier and sheeting. I love the challenge. The bench plugs I have given all much thought on as I have read countless blogs by experienced hands and this is where I have drawn my resources from. Thanks to all for your responses.

Regards,
Dan P.

-- If there were no God, there would be no atheists, G. K. Chesterton

View electricalD's profile

electricalD

116 posts in 1860 days


#13 posted 11-02-2011 07:28 AM

Hello Doordude, The cooling is not a big thing as I live in a relatively cool climate. If it cones down to it then I can install one of those window type AC units. In Canada we have the natural cool air, LOL.
Regards,
Dan

-- If there were no God, there would be no atheists, G. K. Chesterton

View redryder's profile

redryder

2233 posts in 1853 days


#14 posted 11-02-2011 08:08 AM

Isn’t it unbelievable how much things cost. Just build it the way YOU want it. You will be happy. Lookin’ great….........

-- mike...............

View rustfever's profile

rustfever

639 posts in 2061 days


#15 posted 11-02-2011 10:53 AM

Dan,
As to the electrical, install ceiling outlets and power cord reels. Keeps cords out of the walk area.

-- Rustfever, Central California

showing 1 through 15 of 25 comments

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase