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Workbench #2: The Frame

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Blog entry by edwood1975 posted 01-06-2015 03:01 PM 1249 reads 0 times favorited 6 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 1: The Design Part 2 of Workbench series Part 3: The Bottom Shelf »

Im using 3” screws to assemble the frame..


This is one of the sides, 1 down 1 to go

This is the completed frame..

Well here is the completed frame, it was difficult and no matter how often I thought everything was square and plum I was off on the final version..

I used everything from a frame square to a quick square and then when I stood the frame up one of the corners was off the ground by 3/4” so I cheated and stuck a shim under it…

The shelf and worksurface are next…

The frame is totally level !!!!!!!! I guess that’s the main thing…

-- Ed



6 comments so far

View handsawgeek's profile

handsawgeek

591 posts in 858 days


#1 posted 01-06-2015 07:07 PM

Hi, Ed,
It’s always good to find another ‘Ed’ on LJs. It always prompts me to bring out the standard ‘Ed’ jokes…

“2 Eds are better than one”, etc.

Anyway, first off welcome to the LJ site. You will definitely find a lot to sink your teeth into here.

You have a very great start on a workshop, one that I’m sure you will be upgrading and modifying as you go along.
I’ve been doing this woodworking thing for close to 25 years now and I’m constantly finding ways to upgrade my shop. Most of it has been done on the cheap with scrounged and found materials. I’m still, nor likely ever will be, anywhere close to the ideal. The fun is in trying to get there!

May I make a couple of suggestions on your workbench?

1. With the relatively light construction of the 2×4 frame and legs, you will likely experience a certain amount of racking, that is, the whole bench top will tend to want to move in the horizontal direction during certain heavier operations. This is more of a big deal if you will be doing any hand sawing or planing, which applies pretty hefty horizontal forces to a workbench. An inexpensive way to counteract this is to screw some pieces of plywood directlly to the legs on all sides just underneath the frame. You can get by with foot wide pieces, but the wider, the better. They will make a huge difference in shoring up the overall sturdiness of the entire bench.
2. Get a vise. This is a completely indespensible tool. To start out, you don’t need to get an expensive woodworkng vise – a good machinist’s vise will work fine for starters. These can be found sometimes at yard sales and flea markets for reasonable prices. Be sure to make some hardwood auxiliary jaw pads, as the metal jaws will mar any work you clamp into it. A vise is so useful, you’ll wonder how you ever got by without one.

3. Always view your workbench as being THE most important tool in your shop. It is the basis for everything you will be doing there.

Again, you have found a woodworking site with lots of experienced folks who can guide you with endless amounts of woodworking know-how. Don’t hesitate to pick our brains!

Enjoy the ride!

-- Ed

View handsawgeek's profile

handsawgeek

591 posts in 858 days


#2 posted 01-06-2015 07:24 PM

Hi, Ed,
Me again.

If you want some inspiration on how to set up a complete woodworking shop on the cheap, click on my blog button. In the early part of the list is an entry titled “The Joys of Scrounging”. ‘Nuff sed”

-- Ed

View edwood1975's profile

edwood1975

492 posts in 806 days


#3 posted 01-06-2015 07:46 PM

Hi Ed,

Thanks for all the great tips.. I was hoping this bench would be the best thing since sliced bread but after some comments I realize that it isn’t
.... Anyway in regards to applying ply to the legs .. Do you mean applying a sandwich around all sides Of the legs.. Like wrapping them so to speak?????

Hi, Ed,
It s always good to find another Ed on LJs. It always prompts me to bring out the standard Ed jokes…

“2 Eds are better than one”, etc.

Anyway, first off welcome to the LJ site. You will definitely find a lot to sink your teeth into here.

You have a very great start on a workshop, one that I m sure you will be upgrading and modifying as you go along.
I ve been doing this woodworking thing for close to 25 years now and I m constantly finding ways to upgrade my shop. Most of it has been done on the cheap with scrounged and found materials. I m still, nor likely ever will be, anywhere close to the ideal. The fun is in trying to get there!

May I make a couple of suggestions on your workbench?

1. With the relatively light construction of the 2×4 frame and legs, you will likely experience a certain amount of racking, that is, the whole bench top will tend to want to move in the horizontal direction during certain heavier operations. This is more of a big deal if you will be doing any hand sawing or planing, which applies pretty hefty horizontal forces to a workbench. An inexpensive way to counteract this is to screw some pieces of plywood directlly to the legs on all sides just underneath the frame. You can get by with foot wide pieces, but the wider, the better. They will make a huge difference in shoring up the overall sturdiness of the entire bench.
2. Get a vise. This is a completely indespensible tool. To start out, you don t need to get an expensive woodworkng vise – a good machinist s vise will work fine for starters. These can be found sometimes at yard sales and flea markets for reasonable prices. Be sure to make some hardwood auxiliary jaw pads, as the metal jaws will mar any work you clamp into it. A vise is so useful, you ll wonder how you ever got by without one.

3. Always view your workbench as being THE most important tool in your shop. It is the basis for everything you will be doing there.

Again, you have found a woodworking site with lots of experienced folks who can guide you with endless amounts of woodworking know-how. Don t hesitate to pick our brains!

Enjoy the ride!

- handsawgeek


-- Ed

View handsawgeek's profile

handsawgeek

591 posts in 858 days


#4 posted 01-06-2015 07:55 PM

Worry not. You will love it once you are finished and put it to use…

A good example of plywood bracing is in one of the photos in my blog post mentioned earlier. The workbench that the chop saw is mounted to uses precisely this technique. One piece of ply per side and one along the back will do the job nicely.

-- Ed

View Roger's profile

Roger

19867 posts in 2267 days


#5 posted 01-06-2015 10:36 PM

Lots n lots of fine machining going on there. Coming along very nicely.

-- Roger from KY. Work/Play/Travel Safe. Keep your dust collector fed. Kentuk55@yahoo.com

View Mike Throckmorton's profile

Mike Throckmorton

124 posts in 1127 days


#6 posted 01-07-2015 06:00 PM

Here's a great way to get a super useful woodworking vise on the cheap (and pick up some skills).

-- You are never complete, you just draw a line where done is and stop at that line.

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