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MY-2-CENTS #1: Jointer set up

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Blog entry by eastside posted 07-11-2009 07:50 PM 2821 reads 1 time favorited 8 comments Add to Favorites Watch
no previous part Part 1 of MY-2-CENTS series Part 2: Single rail table saw sled »

When ever I get the opportunity to see another shop I’m always looking to see how they do things or the tools they use, always looking for a better idea. Even when looking at the pictures or videos posted here I’m looking at the background and saying to myself (ah look what he has), admit it you do it too. So I’m going to talk about some of the procedures I use or just the tools and jigs that make my life easier no matter how small they are. I’ll try to add something about once a week and I hope you like it. I’ll call it My -2- cents.

This is how I check my jointer for square after the digital tool tells me it’s square. I purposely put the fence off 5 degrees to make my point. It is possible to joint a couple of boards, slap them together on the bench and think that everything is square if you’re not careful with what you’re doing. You just might have one board bevel side up and the other bevel side down.

#1 I start by joining 2 boards and laying them on something flat like your table saw bed. Look at the joint.

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Image and video hosting by TinyPic

#2 Next flip both over and check again.

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#3 Flip one board and check again.

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Image and video hosting by TinyPic

#4 Finally flip both over and check again.

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If your jointer is not square it would have shown up on one of those checks. The reason for all the flips is to make sure you don’t have two matching bevels sliding together. Because the fence was 5 degrees out it showed up in the last check and that’s because I started out with the worst scenario being bevel up and bevel down. Now with that said when I mark the faces of two boards I want to glue up I still will joint them with one face against the fence and the other away from the fence for the best possible results and that’s my-2-cents.

-- Mike, Westport MA.



8 comments so far

View Dusty56's profile

Dusty56

11806 posts in 3153 days


#1 posted 07-11-2009 08:34 PM

Nice refresher course : )

Presently I have my jointer at a machine shop and they are truing the beds and the fence faces for me. It’s an old Rockwell-Delta unit that has seen much use prior to me owning it and after all , things do wear over time. The beds were no longer flat and level to each other and the fence was not square from beginning to end.

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

115202 posts in 3042 days


#2 posted 07-12-2009 02:59 AM

Thanks I’m sure that will help alot of folks

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Dusty56's profile

Dusty56

11806 posts in 3153 days


#3 posted 07-12-2009 04:07 PM

GarageWoodworks , this is a nice tip if your fence is true and flat along its height and width (length) . Mine was not. A professional straight edge is worth the money to find flaws in your tools surfaces . From front to back across my jointers outfeed table , the difference was just over 30 thousandths compared to my infeed table .

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

View cabinetmaster's profile

cabinetmaster

10874 posts in 3023 days


#4 posted 07-12-2009 04:22 PM

Nice refresher course. I think we all forget these steps every now and then.

-- Jerry--A man can never have enough tools or clamps

View eastside's profile

eastside

97 posts in 2727 days


#5 posted 07-12-2009 04:59 PM

Brian nice web page but could not find the jointer alignment on it. I’m going to assume you use the TS Aligner tool. Dusty I keep saying I need a good professional straight edge then I price them. Some day I’m going to bite the bullet and get one I really wish I had one. Another tool I use is a digital angle gauge. This tool has a magnetic base and when stuck to the bed you zero it out then stick it to the fence, read the angle and adjust the fence to 90. This is what I use it most for but it has many uses. I used it to check trueness on my jointer and table saw for the problem you had. Once zeroed out slide it around the bed to all 4 corners it should stay zero then without resetting it put on the out feed table and repeat, it works well. I did the same on the fence sliding it the full length of the fence. Jointer fences are attached in the middle with the ends subject to abuse and after time it’s a good idea to check it if just for peace of mind.

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-- Mike, Westport MA.

View Dusty56's profile

Dusty56

11806 posts in 3153 days


#6 posted 07-12-2009 05:26 PM

My jointer is old enough that it adjusts from the end only. I picked up one of the “Dixie” gauges from Peachtree , and the magnets were so weak on it , I had to add some rare earth magnets of my own to keep it from sliding down my fence faces and saw blades. It only came with one of the two batteries and the belt holster that was advertised was also missing.
Regarding the straight edge . I had the same machine shop make me three of them . A 6” and an 8” with a perfect 45degree on one end and a perfect 90degree on the other end for setting my jointer and saw , etc.. and a 32” ,which I use for checking my tables and fences . They are made from “tool steel” , which expands and contracts less than the aluminum ( per the Machinist) which I had originally wanted to use , and are hefty enough to stand on their own . 1/4” thick and 2” high . Check out your local machine shops and / or Tech Schools (in season) and get some quotes. ... You might be pleasantly surprised : )

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

View eastside's profile

eastside

97 posts in 2727 days


#7 posted 07-12-2009 05:54 PM

GREAT IDEA Dusty, I’m actually a grad from my local tech school and they will probably make it for cost. Never thought I would be glad to start seeing the school buses again.

-- Mike, Westport MA.

View Roger's profile

Roger

19878 posts in 2269 days


#8 posted 11-10-2010 04:41 AM

very interesting eastside. I just have an old 6” craftsman jointer that I bought in a garage sale quite a few years ago. It was all out-ta whack when I brought it home. I “tuned it up, and it does a really good job that I’m satisfied with. I even had to use a playing card as a shim, where the fence locks down, and believe it or not, it helped square it up. Playing cards are great to keep handy. You can use just one, or many. I am going to try your method. It never hurts to check things a couple different ways. Thnx for sharing

-- Roger from KY. Work/Play/Travel Safe. Keep your dust collector fed. Kentuk55@yahoo.com

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