LumberJocks

"Don't Stress" glue ups... an update

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Blog entry by dustbunny posted 06-11-2010 07:35 PM 1087 reads 2 times favorited 11 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I used the clamping glue up board-

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For the wave cutting board I could only use it in one direction
because two sides of the board have the wave.
The convex rows are beyond the concave rows
so if I clamped it in that direction the wave rows wouldn’t line up.

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For now I give this jig a 3.5 star rating out of 5 stars.
I have a few issues to fix-
Smitty mentioned about not being able to micro adjust the clamp- that is true.
so I made a few different thicknesses of shims to place against the cauls. That worked.
Now I need to fix the drift on the jack clamping face plate.
The bar that has the straight gear teeth on it, likes to lift under pressure.
I think if I put a block under the back side of the bar it will stop this.

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With that fixed I would give it a 4.5 star. The micro adjustment thing
adds an extra step to the glue up. If I could figure out how to do a
permanent fix to the gear ratio this would be perfect. A bit more tweaking….

Any ideas besides shims ?

Lisa

-- Imagination rules the world. ~ Napoleon Bonaparte ~ http://quiltedwood.com



11 comments so far

View BarbS's profile

BarbS

2434 posts in 2840 days


#1 posted 06-11-2010 07:46 PM

You need a shaped caul to match the concave/convex side.. use a scribe and pencil to copy onto solid stock, then bandsaw the stacked shape twice. Wax it and apply it to the sides. As to the creeping upward, maybe.. less pressure? No need to kill it, I’d think. But I haven’t done it, so just .02 cents’ worth!

-- http://barbsid.blogspot.com/

View dustbunny's profile

dustbunny

1149 posts in 2050 days


#2 posted 06-11-2010 07:48 PM

I was just remembering Martyn’s (BritBoxmaker) adjustable cauls -

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I think this would take care of the micro adjustment,
great idea Martyn !!
Thanks for your blog I will add this feature.

Lisa

-- Imagination rules the world. ~ Napoleon Bonaparte ~ http://quiltedwood.com

View dustbunny's profile

dustbunny

1149 posts in 2050 days


#3 posted 06-11-2010 07:55 PM

Barbs-
you are right about a complimentary caul for the wave.
There’s just not enough time in the day, I will do this eventually.
The lift is caused under the slightest pressure. The arm rocks on the round gear,
and with that I don’t get squeeze out before it starts lifting.
I put a block under the back of the arm, and it worked. Just need to make
it permanent and make some adjustments.

Thanks,

Lisa

-- Imagination rules the world. ~ Napoleon Bonaparte ~ http://quiltedwood.com

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112943 posts in 2332 days


#4 posted 06-11-2010 07:58 PM

Sorry to butt in this nice and talented bunch of ladies but I just had to say how cool it is that all three of you are so talented and innovative . Keep show the way for all us guys. Super Idea Lisa.

Edit
It’s not to say you are the only talented ladys that make LJs so great

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View dustbunny's profile

dustbunny

1149 posts in 2050 days


#5 posted 06-11-2010 08:04 PM

Hey Wonder Woman,
Have you completed conquering the great chest of medicine yet ?
I am waiting for a blog…..

Lisa

-- Imagination rules the world. ~ Napoleon Bonaparte ~ http://quiltedwood.com

View jm82435's profile

jm82435

1281 posts in 2497 days


#6 posted 06-11-2010 08:25 PM

Maybe reverse the two?
Use the HF fixture as the “caul”, since it is quick adjusting and has a longer stroke but no fine adjustment.
Then use “3 Speeds” fixture to actually apply the pressure.
I was also thinking about a machinist vise. It has two 45 degree planes between the screw and the vise face. This pushes the vise face down, keeping the clamping action from lifting the work. (but it would also compound the problem in this case of lifting the rack) maybe using a sliding dovetail or T slot track under the clamp into the base?

-- A thing of beauty is a joy forever...

View Mary Anne's profile (online now)

Mary Anne

1057 posts in 1964 days


#7 posted 06-11-2010 08:59 PM

I have nothing of value to offer for solving the micro adjusting problem other than to second the idea of adapting Martyn’s idea.

Or figuring a way to use a bolt in the ball head and handle that would extend or retract the tongue that goes into the grooves.

Otherwise, it makes me think you are working on the innards to a slot machine. ;)

View ellen35's profile

ellen35

2596 posts in 2187 days


#8 posted 06-11-2010 08:59 PM

Does the pressure on the wavy side have to be even? Can you use a saw tooth design on the cutting board side (flat on clamp side) that can be applied to other boards? Maybe pressure on just the dark blocks? These jig design adjustments are just so challenging!

-- "Don't let the perfect be the enemy of the good." Voltaire

View BarbS's profile

BarbS

2434 posts in 2840 days


#9 posted 06-11-2010 09:43 PM

Lisa, I know you are trying to utilize the HF clamps you bought, but if they are slipping upward under pressure, I fear they may be just that… Harbor Freight clamps.
Here is a photo of a ‘Mortising jig’ from Carol Reed’s Router Joinery Workshop (Lark Books, 2003) Good book, by the way; lots of shop-made jigs for the tool.

It is for routing mortises in a workpiece, and the acrylic router base on top of it stabilizes the router. There are inset stops to calibrate the length of cut, etc.
I’m wondering if a veneer press screw, set into a wide outer jaw, as this one is, would work better for complicated glue-ups. You wouldn’t need the back, slotted fence or the acrylic base plate of course, but that outer jaw puts an easily-adjustable force on whatever is put in it.

-- http://barbsid.blogspot.com/

View degoose's profile

degoose

7052 posts in 2110 days


#10 posted 06-11-2010 10:54 PM

Cool Idea… can’t find the clamps locally but will make some…thanks for the offer.

-- Drink twice... and don't bother to cut... @ lazylarrywoodworks.com.au For lovers of all things timber...

View BarbS's profile

BarbS

2434 posts in 2840 days


#11 posted 06-12-2010 12:27 AM

A suggestion: if you make that jaw, don’t forget the arched piece attached behind the top of the front jaw. It serves to stabilize the wide front jaw piece so it does not flex under pressure.

-- http://barbsid.blogspot.com/

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