LumberJocks

Hand Planes #10: Taking inventory

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Blog entry by dsb1829 posted 12-16-2008 11:02 PM 1562 reads 0 times favorited 11 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 9: Plane fun Part 10 of Hand Planes series Part 11: Blade prep, freehand »

I posted this photo on my last blog (it may get clipped, if it is just click the image to see the whole thing). Well this afternoon I took inventory. I had type cast a few previously, but wanted to do all that I could.

Back Row (L-R):
1 – Sandusky coffin smooth plane, pre-1900’s
2 – Stanley No78 rabbit plane, likely from the 1940-1960’s
3 – Stanley No40 scrub plane, 1920-1940
4 – Stanley No7 jointer plane, type11, 1910-1918
5 – Stanley No6 fore plane, type6, 1888-1892
6 – Stanley No5 jack plane, type18, 1946-1947
7 – Stanley No4 smooth plane, type11, 1910-1918
8 – Stanley No3 smooth plane, type17, 1942-1945
9 – LieNielsen medium shoulder plane, 2007-2008

Front Row (L-R):
1 – Stanley No80M cabinet scraper, Sweet Heart era 1919-1932
2 – Lie-Nielsen low angle block plane, 2008

Not pictured:
1 – Stanley No29 transitional fore plane, 1867-1909
2 – Ohio Tool wooden jack plane, unknown age
3 – Stanley No4 smooth plane, type17, 1942-1945
4 – Stanley No5 jack plane, type12-13, 1919-1928
5 – Stanley No608 jointer plane, type14, 1929-1930
6 – Stanley 60-1/2, unknown age, crack at mouth

Wow, they weren’t kidding when they said that getting into hand tools and restoration is a slippery slope. I don’t think I ever stopped and took inventory before just now. Simply shocking that over a dozen of these things have followed me home. The only saving grace is that most didn’t start out looking pretty. The ugly duckling factor keeps the bidding low over at e-bay so most of these planes were under $20. After the elbow grease each is capable of pulling $50-100 at auction. Not a bad return on investment. Of course I have no plans of setting any of these loose any time soon. Gotta get my money’s worth out of them or the Mrs. is gonna have my head :)

So there you have it, the current low down on my hand planes. It has been a fun journey.

-- Doug, woodworking in Alabama



11 comments so far

View Beginningwoodworker's profile

Beginningwoodworker

13347 posts in 3136 days


#1 posted 12-17-2008 12:41 AM

Thats a nice list. I got a question how do you like those hock blades?

View dsb1829's profile

dsb1829

367 posts in 3090 days


#2 posted 12-17-2008 12:48 AM

Hey CJ,
I am a big fan of the Hock blades. I like to double-up by adding their chip breaker as well. The combination of these 2 items gives mass, rigidity, and a great cut. Also since I bought most of my planes fairly rough the stock blades had rust and pitting. Buying new blades and breakers improves performance, but also typically reduces the headaches required getting old plane off the ground again. I am not sure that the improvements are necessary for the fore planes, but on my jointers and smoothers it is nice.

Also initially as I was dailing in my honing techniques it was much easier to get a fine edge on these tool irons. In retrospect it was more my inexperience sharpening than deficiency of the stock iron and chip breakers. Now that I strop after stoning I can get very thin shavings even with stock irons.

I am still waiting for a personal thank you note from Rev. Ron after buying all that steel from him :)

-- Doug, woodworking in Alabama

View Quixote's profile

Quixote

206 posts in 3101 days


#3 posted 12-17-2008 03:41 AM

Brother, Can you spare a blade?

......

O’kay it’s kind of lame that I couldn’t think of anything funny to rhyme with dime.

Q

-- I don't make sawdust...I produce vast quantities of "Micro Mulch."

View Tomcat1066's profile

Tomcat1066

942 posts in 3259 days


#4 posted 12-17-2008 04:10 AM

Now you’re just showing off :P

-- "Give me your poor tools, your tired steel, your huddled masses of rust." Yep, I ripped off the Statue of Liberty. That's how I roll!

View dsb1829's profile

dsb1829

367 posts in 3090 days


#5 posted 12-17-2008 04:19 AM

Not much of a show by some’s standards. One of the other forums I use one of the guys had over 500 planes. And you think I have issues :)

-- Doug, woodworking in Alabama

View Tomcat1066's profile

Tomcat1066

942 posts in 3259 days


#6 posted 12-17-2008 04:27 AM

Yeah, I saw that on SMC…but he was showing off too :P

Seriously, that’s a nice collection you’ve got there, no 500 plane collection, but at least you can fit them all in one picture :D

-- "Give me your poor tools, your tired steel, your huddled masses of rust." Yep, I ripped off the Statue of Liberty. That's how I roll!

View dsb1829's profile

dsb1829

367 posts in 3090 days


#7 posted 12-17-2008 04:43 AM

So maybe that should be the metric. Once they no longer fit in frame you are done. Then you have to let one go to get another. I might be able to work that out. Of course in the end I would have all LN :) Nah, not sure about that. I want to build some woodies and infills eventually. If I get the hang of that the LN don’t offer anything more than a deeper hole in my pocket.

Quixote, what are you looking for? I do have most of the original blades. Some are in decent shape. Send me an e-mail.

-- Doug, woodworking in Alabama

View Tomcat1066's profile

Tomcat1066

942 posts in 3259 days


#8 posted 12-17-2008 01:16 PM

Actually, once you can no longer fit them in the frame, you need a camera with a wide angle lens, then start anew ;)

-- "Give me your poor tools, your tired steel, your huddled masses of rust." Yep, I ripped off the Statue of Liberty. That's how I roll!

View Douglas Bordner's profile

Douglas Bordner

4012 posts in 3526 days


#9 posted 12-17-2008 04:40 PM

Now that you have all the thin laminated chrome vanadium stock irons laying around, you have to build some woodies, but then you’ll want Hock for them too. What’s a fellow to do!

-- "Bordnerizing" perfectly good lumber for over a decade.

View dsb1829's profile

dsb1829

367 posts in 3090 days


#10 posted 12-17-2008 05:59 PM

Hey Douglas, don’t put it past me :)
Actually part of my reason for getting into wood planes was due to the fact that they are soooo cheap on e-bay. The Sandusky I picked up figuring I would just snag the blade and junk the rest of it. Usually for $5-10 you can pick up an old woody with a tapered cast blade that is over 1/8in thick. Not many other options that cheap for blades for your homemade wood planes.

The Sandusky just had such a nice shape that I decided to clean it up. I used some glue to stabilize the cracks then coated it with a couple layers of shellac. It really didn’t take too much time. That blade on the other hand cost me about 3 hours to get the back flat. It was thick enough to handle the metal removal, but boy was it a chore.

-- Doug, woodworking in Alabama

View Beginningwoodworker's profile

Beginningwoodworker

13347 posts in 3136 days


#11 posted 12-18-2008 04:54 PM

Thanks Doug, I will be buying a Hock Iron for my No 8 jointer plane. I already have their chipbreaker and its works good.

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