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The workbench #1: The first in series of nine

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Blog entry by dryhter posted 1750 days ago 2222 reads 1 time favorited 9 comments Add to Favorites Watch
no previous part Part 1 of The workbench series Part 2: Mortising »

Hey everyone,

Well it was just about a year ago that I started on this project, eventually I entered it in the Winter lumberjocks contest, some may remember it,it even got a few votes. While I was constructing the workbench I was shooting video and have about nine hours of video. This is the first of a series of nine.
I also have a website That I will be posting future episodes to, as well as here at lumberjocks. Prior to starting the bench I checked out the www. to see what kind of videos were available regarding building a heavy-duty heirloom quality woodworker’s bench and there were few, maybe none. There were plans but no actual video of actually building a bench.

I am getting to a question here so please bear with me.

My BIL who is a web master and helped build my site tells me a video needs to be short maybe ten minutes max., because peoples attention spans are short and anything after that people will just tune out. And I can’t really disagree with with him, but, I disagree with him on this point.

If you are going to use the web for entertainment or socially then short is good, but if you are using the web as a tool and you want to find out how to do something then short is not so good. And that is the niche’ that I would like to fill. I know lot’s of thing about working wood, somethings learned at great expense, other things just from doing.

So, here is the question “Do you think this kind of format will work or should I edit the videos?”
Anyways enjoy!

The workbench
1 thru 9

These videos (one thru nine) detail the building of a heavy duty woodworking bench. The bench is often considered a watermark in a woodworker’s career, testing skills to blend form and function. All is revealed, along with my thoughts on the hows and whys I did what I did.

The captured video is in raw form, without editing, in real time. My hope is that you may see me do something while constructing the bench that might help you build yours, but might have been edited out as being unimportant. The video is not meant to be strictly instructional but more of a visit to a friend or mentor’s shop. While I make no claims of being a master woodworker, I do have 25plus years of experience being a carpenter and cabinet maker and would like to share what I have learned. The learning never ends and I am always seeking a better way to do things, join me on my journey.

ONE
That was the case with this workbench, using salvaged materials from a remodeling project is the starting point. I discuss preparing the used materials for the project and finish with using a lathe to turn some massive, yet elegant legs.

There are no drawings for the bench, I have an idea in my mind of what I want to build, and the available materials will ultimately dictate what is produced. I sometimes like to build something with materials that I have, as opposed to buying what is needed. This is fun for me, the challenge, is bringing into balance what I want to build with what I can build. Many times this kind of project causes me to be creative, pushing the boundaries and causing a great deal of thinking, which is a good thing. And if I can clean up a pile of material and build something, so much the better.

Two

Coming soon to www.underconstructionlive.com

-- Chips and Shavings/ see you at WWW.underconstructionlive.com



9 comments so far

View Luke's profile

Luke

538 posts in 1918 days


#1 posted 1750 days ago

Sounds like a really neat idea for a podcast or youtube videos or some easier way to find you(streaming).
I don’t know if it’s just me but the video in this post just tries to get me to download a flv file.
I’m assuming not playable by streaming.

-- LAS, http://www.abettersign.com

View rozzi's profile

rozzi

322 posts in 1946 days


#2 posted 1749 days ago

Very good. I enjoyed it. Keep them coming.

-- Duane, Iowa

View dryhter's profile

dryhter

74 posts in 2228 days


#3 posted 1748 days ago

Hey skywalker,
I edited the post and switched the video to a flash player, let me know if you still have a problem playing.
I like youtube but they have a time limit of ten minutes and most of my videos are close to an hour.
I would like to do streaming videos when I am in the shop working, just don’t have the coin to set it up, but hey Christmas is coming and I have been a very good boy this past year.

Hey Rozzi,
Glad to hear that, eight more videos will be comming soon.

-- Chips and Shavings/ see you at WWW.underconstructionlive.com

View Luke's profile

Luke

538 posts in 1918 days


#4 posted 1748 days ago

Working now. thanks

-- LAS, http://www.abettersign.com

View king's profile

king

71 posts in 2571 days


#5 posted 1743 days ago

I enjoyed your video,thanks.Al

-- franklinalbert@sbcglobal.net

View Derek Lyons's profile

Derek Lyons

584 posts in 2192 days


#6 posted 1743 days ago

Your BIL is dead wrong. Many podcasts and videos on the web are under ten minutes long because they not only lack any real content, but are also not actually aimed at any audience beyond the random short attention span surfer.

Tell your BIL to head over to The Wood Whisperer or Wood Treks and check out the average length of videos that actually contain content and are aimed at a specific audience. (It also help’s that those videos make an honest attempt at good lighting, decent sound, and proper camera work – again, utterly unlike the average web video.)

-- Derek, Bremerton WA --

View gmerteng's profile

gmerteng

122 posts in 1737 days


#7 posted 1736 days ago

Did you find that using recycled lumber was hard on your blades, because of the dirt and stuff.

-- Mert,Oshkosh WI,

View dryhter's profile

dryhter

74 posts in 2228 days


#8 posted 1734 days ago

Hey gmerteng, Thanks for looking at the video. Yes using the planer on salvaged material is pretty tough on the blades, but not on the machine. As careful as I was about removing the nails and staples from the wood a few staples (from attaching insulation to the stud cavities ) got through and added a few new nicks in the blades.Luckily these staples are pretty soft steel compared to the blades and did little damage.
On my planer it is easy to shift the blades and reduce the effects of this.

-- Chips and Shavings/ see you at WWW.underconstructionlive.com

View Derek Lyons's profile

Derek Lyons

584 posts in 2192 days


#9 posted 1734 days ago

The moral of that story is: If you use salvage wood, invest in a metal detector. :)

-- Derek, Bremerton WA --

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