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Radial Arm Saw #1: DIY Crank

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Blog entry by drsongs posted 03-03-2011 07:33 PM 1636 reads 0 times favorited 5 comments Add to Favorites Watch
no previous part Part 1 of Radial Arm Saw series Part 2: Handle fix »

I went to the restore again to see if I could find a crank for my RAS and found this door lever and knob.

So I thought I’ll just make one. Well the original crank angled out which I didn’t realize or think about.
So the door lever hit the table. When I tried to bend it out it broke.

Then I thought maybe I can attach an extension to the original crank and I found this wrench that came with one of those “some assembly required” deals we got at one time or something don’t remember what it was for but it was in with a bunch of “I’ll hold on to this stuff cause I may need it some day” and it looked like the perfect piece I needed. (now I can tell the wife… see I did need to hold on to this stuff)

And it was….



With the knob the trick is getting the screw just the right length to be tight and not sloppy but turn easy.

I had planned on putting two screws to hold the extension on but because the curve fit so nicely I only had to tap one hole and it is nice and strong.

So there you go – I wasted a couple of bucks on the lever but it did lead me to the final product.

Blessings,
Denny

-- Respect your tools so you keep all your fingers to play guitar... and Thank God daily.



5 comments so far

View nobuckle's profile

nobuckle

1120 posts in 2223 days


#1 posted 03-03-2011 09:31 PM

Very ingenious. When you’re strapped for money or when you can’t find the part you do what you have to to accomplish the goal.

-- Doug - Make an effort to live by the slogan "We try harder"

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

13003 posts in 2155 days


#2 posted 03-03-2011 09:45 PM

You rule. So much.
I love these kind of fixes.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View drsongs's profile

drsongs

43 posts in 2114 days


#3 posted 03-04-2011 01:28 AM

Thanks guys – I could have bought a new one online for $12.50 plus shipping – so not sure but could’ve been close to $20 by the time I was done. I just didn’t feel like spending that much when I was sure I could find something to work for a couple of bucks. Anyway this is much more fun and satisfying :)

-- Respect your tools so you keep all your fingers to play guitar... and Thank God daily.

View rlrobinhood's profile

rlrobinhood

80 posts in 2108 days


#4 posted 03-04-2011 04:34 AM

Thats awesome!! Nice fix. On a slightly different note, how easy (how much pressure) does it take to crank the saw up and down? How about rotating the carriage right/left (meaning if the arm is at 90 degrees, tilting the saw blade so it is not perpendicular to the table)? Just curious as I’m getting ready to tear apart mine and degrease it. Thanks and nice work again.

View drsongs's profile

drsongs

43 posts in 2114 days


#5 posted 03-04-2011 05:19 PM

RL – That’s kind of a hard ? to answer. As you know there is some weight to the column & arm so it takes some pressure but it’s not a struggle in any way. I’d say it’s a bit more than what my table saw is to raise and lower the blade. As far as the bevel I’ve only moved it once to see if and how it works. I haven’t needed to use that feature so I haven’t got that far yet in cleaning that up. Mine is definitely in need of cleaning as it doesn’t bevel smoothly. My belief is that the bevel will take less pressure than raising the arm when working properly.

Al – Checked out your stuff – nice work!

-- Respect your tools so you keep all your fingers to play guitar... and Thank God daily.

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