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Making the dw infills #3: Part 3 the infill saga

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Blog entry by Don W posted 04-03-2013 09:31 PM 1491 reads 1 time favorited 20 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 2: Let's dovetail Part 3 of Making the dw infills series Part 4: Let do some tapping and peening. »

So making the infill wasn’t so bad. Its so much easier when make a base. When you make the base, its square and true, unlike the inside of the cast vintage planes, so making and addind the base is much easier.

I choose walnut for this, and after some help from my friend over on the HPOYD thread, I decided to ebonize it.

Most of this is just normal woodworking, at least for the first part.

And marking and laying it out,

I decided to make this one in 1 piece. I’m not sure it’s really important and the others I didn’t. I don’t see much difference in the outcome. I used the router to cut it out.

I drilled the center, cut it with a scroll saw and shaped it with some rasps and files.

constant fitting to ensure it was going right.

Once it was formed and sanded, It was time to darken it. I had some issues with the ebonozing. I took some white vinegar and stuck some steel wool in it. After several days nothing had happened. I made sure i was using real steel wool. After some reading and some help from the guys over on the HPOYD thread, I threw some rusty nails in it and put the heat gun to it. If your doing this it is advisable to keep the cap loose and be in a well ventilated area.

Whala

I then gave it several coats of dark walnut danish oil.
Its not ready, but lets try it out anyhow.

ahhh, some sweet shavings

Now to fasten it in. I drilled the side hole just a little smaller than some #12 brass screws, and used a reamer to give it a slight taper, along with a countersink to give the holes a little countersink. I then drove the screws as tight as I could into the countersink. Note, you need slotted screws for this. With Philips head screws, the Philips cut out goes to far down into the shaft.

I then took the grinder to the screws, sanded the sides with my ROS, from 80 grit up through 320, and buffed it out.

The the knob and tote got a couple coats of wipe on poly.

I also realized I didn’t take any pictures of making the cap iron or lever cap, so next plane for sure.

The cap iron is Low-Carbon Steel Rectangular Bar, 1/8” Thick, 2” Width, 2’ Length, drilled and tapped, given a slight bend into the iron, the end ground at an angle and polished up.

Cost calculation:
Steel, $12
Brass, $12
Cap screws $3
Brass screws, $6
about 1 BF of walnut. cost ?
Vinegar $3
Bridge City close out knurled adjuster $5.50
Hock Iron $50

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com



20 comments so far

View JayT's profile

JayT

2607 posts in 956 days


#1 posted 04-03-2013 09:45 PM

Still loving it. Can’t wait to see how you do the lever cap.

-- "The American Republic will endure until the day Congress discovers that it can bribe the public with the public's money." Alexis de Tocqueville, 1835

View BTimmons's profile

BTimmons

2177 posts in 1230 days


#2 posted 04-03-2013 09:51 PM

It’s really cool to see this aspect of your work coming along so nicely.

Apart from looking cool, what’s the functional advantage of an infill plane over other types? I imagine that more mass and having the iron fully supported along the underside reduces chatter? I don’t really know the first thing about this variety.

-- Brian Timmons - http://www.BigTWoodworks.com

View Don W's profile

Don W

15519 posts in 1312 days


#3 posted 04-03-2013 10:05 PM

Advantages:
1. its just cool!!
2. Mass. Its heavier.
3. Infills are typically bedded at 50 or 55 degrees. (this one is 50)
4. Steel. A drop means a dent, and maybe some wood damage which is repairable.
5. they are cool!
6. Brass is shiny.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View ShaneA's profile (online now)

ShaneA

5446 posts in 1343 days


#4 posted 04-03-2013 10:08 PM

It is very nice Don. Every aspect looks great. Can we get a shot of the base?

Congrats on great plane building, and thanks for giving us insight into the process.

View Don W's profile

Don W

15519 posts in 1312 days


#5 posted 04-03-2013 10:16 PM

I plan to take some more pictures Shane. It was still a little tacking when I took the last one.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View ksSlim's profile

ksSlim

1010 posts in 1634 days


#6 posted 04-03-2013 11:14 PM

Great looking. I’m curious, about why ebonize walnut?
Did you just want it darker? Recently tried the process on different wood.
Results on my side, OK but not perfect.

-- Sawdust and shavings are therapeutic

View Don W's profile

Don W

15519 posts in 1312 days


#7 posted 04-03-2013 11:17 PM

I had a piece of walnut that was the right size, and just wanted to try something different. There was not compelling reason really.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View Don W's profile

Don W

15519 posts in 1312 days


#8 posted 04-03-2013 11:30 PM

Shane to answer your question from the second part, I figure I have some wheres between 30-40 hours in it.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View terryR's profile

terryR

3481 posts in 1053 days


#9 posted 04-03-2013 11:41 PM

WOW! That’s awesome, Don! I love the brass screws through the sides…matches your lever cap nicely.

Each one has out done the previous…gonna be hard to top this one! :)

-- tr ...see one, do one, teach one...

View Tugboater78's profile

Tugboater78

1230 posts in 936 days


#10 posted 04-04-2013 01:38 AM

Thats purty, pretty sweet that you made your own

-- Justin - the tugboat woodworker - " nothing changed me like the first shnick from a well sharpened, decent hand plane"

View lysdexic's profile

lysdexic

4892 posts in 1367 days


#11 posted 04-04-2013 03:56 AM

Don, these infills a very handsome. I am really impressed.

-- It isn't the mountains ahead to climb that wear you out; it's the pebble in your shoe. - Muhammad Ali

View bluekingfisher's profile

bluekingfisher

1101 posts in 1724 days


#12 posted 04-04-2013 08:58 AM

Quality work on the plane, one to pass down the generations for sure.

-- No one plans to fail, they just, just fail to plan

View Mauricio's profile

Mauricio

6898 posts in 1896 days


#13 posted 04-04-2013 02:26 PM

I love it Don, amazing work.

So do you think these infills will replace any of your vintage planes for everyday work?

-- Mauricio - Woodstock, GA - "Confusion is the Womb of Learning, with utter conviction being it's Tomb" Prof. T.O. Nitsch

View Don W's profile

Don W

15519 posts in 1312 days


#14 posted 04-04-2013 02:33 PM

So do you think these infills will replace any of your vintage planes for everyday work?

Absolutely.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View Mauricio's profile

Mauricio

6898 posts in 1896 days


#15 posted 04-04-2013 02:35 PM

how cool would it be if all your user planes were infills. Talk about plane envy…

-- Mauricio - Woodstock, GA - "Confusion is the Womb of Learning, with utter conviction being it's Tomb" Prof. T.O. Nitsch

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