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shop made tools #2: Panel Raising Plane.

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Blog entry by Don W posted 932 days ago 3876 reads 5 times favorited 14 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 1: Shop made Krenov inspired smoothing plane Part 2 of shop made tools series Part 3: The Beast. A 36" wood bodied Jointer Plane »

I’ve bid on some panel raising planes but the prices always seem to be out of reach. I decided to convert a wood bodied plane I had restored a while ago.

This is the plane I started with.

I cut a groove on the side toward the raised panel and sharpened the blade on that side as well.

I cut it on the table saw and finished it up with my new Veritas shoulder plane.

I added a nicker to cut the line around the panel. I tried it without it and got some fur on softwood.

I then added a piece on the other side that would wrap around the bottom and form the fence.

I then clean it up down to the line. The line, all the way around, it’s the width (typically 1/4”).

I cut the panel with the panel raiser, then clean it up with one of the 3 planes (#62, #604 or shoulder) I fnd the #62 works best on the end grain typically, and my 604 works best on the long grain. I use the shuolder plane to clean up around the raise.

The picture below shows where cleanup will be needed with th shoulder plane.

I raised 2 test panels so far, one in pine and one in oak (oak is a real small one). I need to find a more convenient way to raise and lower the spur blade, but it works well enough that I will use it until I do.

Thanks for looking.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com



14 comments so far

View CharlesAuguste's profile

CharlesAuguste

126 posts in 1145 days


#1 posted 932 days ago

Well done ! Great way to re-purpose the plane! who gave you such a great idea?

-- "the future's uncertain and the end is always near" J. Morrison

View canadianchips's profile

canadianchips

1831 posts in 1601 days


#2 posted 932 days ago

Don this tip may help. I mark out my panels with a marking guage first, then I use a snipes bill to deepen the groove made by the marking guage close to depth I need, then I use my panel raiser (In my case I call mine a bevel plane).
Hope this is of some help.

-- "My mission in life - make everyone smile !"

View Don W's profile

Don W

14665 posts in 1171 days


#3 posted 932 days ago

well canadianchips, I had to look up what a snipes bill was. Now another plane I absolutely must have.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1719 days


#4 posted 932 days ago

Don ….. DoooH … the cavemand is a little confused here … (nothing new in 2012 about that )
I have a roughbank that is converded simular way where there is a little thin strip added (slipped panel plane)
so it both can be a sort of raised panel (more like a long rabbetplane ) and be used as a roughbank
depeing on if the strip is on or not …........and it doesn´t have the nicker
and neither does the other type of rabbet planes I have … nor does your new Veritas (congrats with it )
the only time you have to use a nicker or score the wood with a cheisel/knife is when you plane across
the grain to start with … planing with the grain shuold be a piece of cake ….. another thing
I don´t under stand is why you have sharpened the side of the iron …. that is not nessery
look at your veritas and your other rabbet planes none of them is sharpened on the side of the blade
but is set so they follow the side of the plane
and a panelraising plane is basicly (as I see it ) just another rabbetplane with a different mould
on the bottom

so why bother with a different set up on the plane if you can ceep it simple
or was it just the chanlange to see if you cuold do it ( no sarcasme or ironi in my comments )
just plain currious

Dennis

Ps.
hmm just had to catch John whelan´s book to read up a little ….. no… only one line about
there was some improofed with spurs/nickers the chapter starts on page 67 about panel planes

take care

View Don W's profile

Don W

14665 posts in 1171 days


#5 posted 932 days ago

Smiity has a pretty good blog about raising panels with a 78

As for the side cut blade, all the panel raising planes I’ve sen are sharpened that way, and it did make a difference when cutting the panel. Why? I’m not sure.

I don’t have a rabbit plane wide enough, and I thought it would be cool to try.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View mafe's profile

mafe

9456 posts in 1693 days


#6 posted 931 days ago

Great idea Don, this is really a nice blog and project.
And the result looks good also.
Way to go man!
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View Dave's profile

Dave

11142 posts in 1443 days


#7 posted 931 days ago

Don you have my full attention. I have a jack rabbet that I have been trying this with. A very well written blog. I think I will give yours a try.

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

View poopiekat's profile

poopiekat

3562 posts in 2338 days


#8 posted 738 days ago

Thanks, Don! Hey, I like that nicker detail too, I’m sure it made a big difference, especially on cross grain. I know of a beat-to-crap #33 in an antique shop for $55 and now I think maybe I should buy it and make a panel-raising body for it.
Hey, somebody say ”Snipe’s Bill”? I got these 2, a matched set, from that British guy on eBay last year. 002-26
And now I finally have a use for them.

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

View Don W's profile

Don W

14665 posts in 1171 days


#9 posted 738 days ago

poopiekat, I would think a #33 would be to long, or at least longer than needed. I may have something shorter like a #26 or #28 that would work and I’ll sell cheaper than $55.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View poopiekat's profile

poopiekat

3562 posts in 2338 days


#10 posted 738 days ago

Don, I was thinking more about the width of the iron, and I would need a blade with a lot of meat left because I would want to grind it to imitate a shaper profile that segues the bevel into a tongue that will fit into the dado in the stiles and rails, instead of a simple bevel right to the edge.

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

View Pete Jones's profile

Pete Jones

2 posts in 249 days


#11 posted 249 days ago

Don, was the plane that you modified a block or rabbet plane?

View Don W's profile

Don W

14665 posts in 1171 days


#12 posted 249 days ago

Pete, it was a block plane. It was just an old fore plane I decided to modify.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View Pete Jones's profile

Pete Jones

2 posts in 249 days


#13 posted 249 days ago

Don, is the edge of the iron on the side you attached the fence flush with the plane body, and if so, did you remove material from the plane?

View Don W's profile

Don W

14665 posts in 1171 days


#14 posted 249 days ago

The fence is notched so the plane sets into it. That makes the iron flush with the fence. If that makes sense.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

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