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dw's Turning #1: First Lathe attempt

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Blog entry by Don W posted 07-09-2011 12:26 AM 1679 reads 0 times favorited 9 comments Add to Favorites Watch
no previous part Part 1 of dw's Turning series Part 2: Need some help from the Lathe guru's. »

So I finally picked up a lathe. A used older craftsman 80. It was missing the pulley, which needs a multiple size pulley which I haven’t found locally yet, so I just put 2 different size pulleys for a 2 speed lathe.

What I don’t understand is why I didn’t pick up a lathe a long time ago. Its a pretty cool tool.

Here is my first turning. A wenge knob for a Stanley #6

Now I need to make the tote to match.

So I moved on to one of the chisel handles I needed.

I think I’m hooked. I have several more handles to make for the chisels I’ve picked up. Who know whats after that. I’ll need to do some reading and pick up a few accessories, like a face plate, and I need another tool rest.

Any suggestions on accessories and turning books would be welcome.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com



9 comments so far

View hairy's profile

hairy

2108 posts in 2276 days


#1 posted 07-09-2011 02:08 AM

Nice work! You can’t go back now. Tool handles was my alibi too. It’s as good as any.

I like to watch this guy. He’s real good. Thanks,Bob!

-- in the confusion, I mighta grabbed the gold ...

View David Kirtley's profile

David Kirtley

1285 posts in 1742 days


#2 posted 07-09-2011 02:54 AM

It is pretty basic as far as what tools you need. It doesn’t take a big set of tools. A set of HSS chisels is nice. Also maybe a small set of tools for little stuff. A good grinder is nice to be able to sharpen quickly.

A good spur center and a live center are great. You can get a faceplate. Also, you can get one of the taps to tap wood to screw onto your spindle. I don’t know the threading on your spindle.

If you have an itch for it, you could pick up the bits and mandrels for pens. I never got into that myself.

You really want to get some wax for finishing. It is a really easy way to put a nice finish on stuff. HUT wax is good.

The only real thing you might get a desire for is tools like a chainsaw and drawknife to rough out stock.

-- Woodworking shouldn't cost a fortune: http://lowbudgetwoodworker.blogspot.com/

View Hawaiilad's profile

Hawaiilad

2185 posts in 1765 days


#3 posted 07-09-2011 09:54 AM

More power to you DW. A friend left a Delta Mini Lathe in my shop about a year ago…I tried a couple times to use it, but it seems one tool that has the best of me. Everytime I try it, I seem to just stop the block of wood from turing…I think I need some lessons. Hope it works well for you.

-- Larry in sunny and warm Hawaii,

View David Kirtley's profile

David Kirtley

1285 posts in 1742 days


#4 posted 07-10-2011 03:50 AM

Hawaiilad:

Odds are, you either have not set the drive center well enough or you are not holding down the tail end tightly enough with the tailstock.

If you are using hardwood, go ahead and drill a small hole on each end to locate the center. You may have to whack it pretty good to get the spurs set. The spurs need to be down into the wood or they will not grab. You can also saw a notch across the end to give them a place to grab.

-- Woodworking shouldn't cost a fortune: http://lowbudgetwoodworker.blogspot.com/

View Hawaiilad's profile

Hawaiilad

2185 posts in 1765 days


#5 posted 07-10-2011 07:26 AM

Thanks for the insight David. I guess I need to spend some time learning how to use the lathe…since I have mastered all the other tools in my shop, it’s sad to see this machine just setting there covered up.

-- Larry in sunny and warm Hawaii,

View Don W's profile

Don W

15516 posts in 1311 days


#6 posted 07-11-2011 01:55 AM

Here is my second go:

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View David Kirtley's profile

David Kirtley

1285 posts in 1742 days


#7 posted 07-11-2011 04:19 AM

August McCormick:

Yes, but… With a metal lathe, you can make a wood lathe. :)

Don:

Looks like you are loosening up. Next stat making a plan. Don’t just cut freehand so you learn to have control over it. General trick: Cut round to a spindle at the maximum diameter. Take a pencil and make marks (while the spindle is turning) at the points where you have a set diameter in your plan. Cut down with the parting tool to the depth you want at each line. This gives you a guide to know when to stop. That way you can make the cutting more fluid without the problem of just cutting more and more away.

The smooth transitions are hardest, followed by making details. Curved handles are easier to hold than straight ones. Leave a bit of a belly to fill the palm of your hand. Also give a nice curved transition where your fingers land. A sharp transition like the bottom of the mallet will hurt your hand to use for a long time.

-- Woodworking shouldn't cost a fortune: http://lowbudgetwoodworker.blogspot.com/

View Don W's profile

Don W

15516 posts in 1311 days


#8 posted 07-11-2011 01:02 PM

Hey David, thanks for the tips.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View bhog's profile

bhog

2177 posts in 1434 days


#9 posted 12-31-2012 05:09 PM

Awesome!! She looks good still to this day

Thank you Don.

-- I don't drive a Prius.

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