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Planes restored - Because I can. #4: Fixing a tote.

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Blog entry by Don W posted 06-03-2011 02:56 AM 2632 reads 2 times favorited 6 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 3: Making a new tote. Part 4 of Planes restored - Because I can. series Part 5: #7 - more of the story - fixing the cap iron. »

I’ve had some question on how I fix the totes. Its a relatively easy task. I typically remove the tote, clean the break and simply glue it back together.

The hard part is holding it together while the glue dries.

I’ve tried several ways. here is what I do.

But the way that seems to work for me best:

I typically use whatever glue is handy, either titebond II or III. I asked this group on LJ’s in another thread, and the samer answer came back several times.

Update: Since I wrote this I have had a couple handles rebreak using regular glue. Having done some gun smithing and stock repairs in the past, I know this epoxy will hold anything. It also comes with a coloring agent which helps hide the line if its not a nice clean break. A kit would do a lot of totes.

Sand and finish as you would anything.

Hope this helps

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com



6 comments so far

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12290 posts in 2753 days


#1 posted 06-03-2011 03:40 AM

I like your use of the vice. I’ve also had good luck with large wood screw clamps….

close up handle

Look ma no break

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1771 days


#2 posted 06-03-2011 09:07 AM

thank´s for sharing Don and wayne :-)

take care
Dennis

View Shopsmithtom's profile

Shopsmithtom

780 posts in 2850 days


#3 posted 06-05-2011 03:46 AM

Great pics. It seems that most planes I find have a broken tote, so I’ve got to go through the same process. The nice part, as you know, is ending up with a repair that is virtually invisible. I use a similar jig to hold the pieces together. It’s the key to a good fix. The most frustrating ones are the previous (poor) repairs that you have to undo first. Way to go. -SST

-- Accuracy is not in your power tool, it's in you

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile (online now)

Smitty_Cabinetshop

9918 posts in 1274 days


#4 posted 07-01-2011 02:49 PM

I like the blocks idea for clamping in the vice. A 50s Craftsman smoother my son gifted to me yesterday has a broken tote (flea market find, and will be it’s own blog post for the story that goes along with the find), so this type of restore action is in my very close future!

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1349 days


#5 posted 07-01-2011 04:00 PM

Like it never happened. Nice job!

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View palaswood's profile

palaswood

777 posts in 407 days


#6 posted 07-25-2014 07:10 PM

cool. i need this.

-- Joseph, Lake Forest, CA, http://instagram.com/palas_woodcraft#

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