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More about the rose of sharon wood

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Blog entry by Don Butler posted 05-18-2015 05:53 PM 1473 reads 0 times favorited 6 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Awhile back I posted a question about the usefulness of the wood from a rose of sharon bush.
My observation was that is is surprisingly white. Some lumberjocks encouraged me to dry it and see how it turned out.

I took a small section from the root flare and set it out to dry without any special preparation and I was surprised at how much it shrinks.

The wood dries to a somewhat yellowish color but sands up very pale, but as you may note from the picture, it cracked wide open. The piece is only about three inches across.

The part above the root flare is still in the shed and I’m hoping it won’t split like this small specimen.

More on the subject when the wood has dried more.

Don “Dances With Wood” Butler

-- No trees were damaged in posting this message, but thousands of electrons were seriously inconvenienced.



6 comments so far

View dawsonbob's profile

dawsonbob

1911 posts in 1216 days


#1 posted 05-18-2015 06:02 PM

Which plant is that from? I looked it up and it seems like there are a number of plants called Rose of Sharon. The bark you have pictured looks a lot like hibiscus to me.

Just curious.

-- Mistakes are what pave the road to perfection

View Don Butler's profile

Don Butler

1086 posts in 2856 days


#2 posted 05-18-2015 06:21 PM

I believe it is a form of hibiscus

Don

-- No trees were damaged in posting this message, but thousands of electrons were seriously inconvenienced.

View dawsonbob's profile

dawsonbob

1911 posts in 1216 days


#3 posted 05-18-2015 06:29 PM

Thank you, Don.

I’m in San Diego, and we have a lot of hibiscus here. I remember trying to carve a piece from one of my Mom’s bushes when I was a kid. It was still wet, and didn’t work out too well. Maybe I’ll try again.

-- Mistakes are what pave the road to perfection

View HerbC's profile

HerbC

1592 posts in 2320 days


#4 posted 05-18-2015 06:39 PM

Most sections of woody plant stems that contain the pith will develop radial cracks during drying due to the differential in shrinkage between the inner and outer layers of wood.

If the stem is large enough to make it practical, the best thing would be to saw it into longitudinal “plank” while the stem is freshly cut. Then sticker and dry in an area with plenty of air movement to promote even drying.

Good Luck!

Herb

-- Herb, Florida - Here's why I close most messages with "Be Careful!" http://lumberjocks.com/HerbC/blog/17090

View leafherder's profile

leafherder

894 posts in 1413 days


#5 posted 05-18-2015 08:06 PM

When was the wood originally cut from the plant? Wood cut in Fall or Winter shrinks and cracks less due to lower sap content during those seasons. Wood cut during Spring has highest sap content so will crack more. I notice you are in Pennsylvania, and here in Ohio we have had a very warm wet Spring which also makes it hard to dry wood properly.

Try again and keep us posted.

-- Leafherder

View Don Butler's profile

Don Butler

1086 posts in 2856 days


#6 posted 05-19-2015 10:40 AM

I took the shrub down only two weeks ago.

-- No trees were damaged in posting this message, but thousands of electrons were seriously inconvenienced.

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