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Hmmm? Requesting Inspiration for Antique Wagon Wheels.

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Blog entry by Mark A. DeCou posted 10-10-2007 01:30 AM 11540 reads 0 times favorited 17 comments Add to Favorites Watch

This week I came up with this axle and wheels from an old antique wagon. I have another set of wheels I found previously, but they don’t match this new set.

I am just scratching my head about what to do with them. I know they are good for something, and something really cool, I just don’t know what yet.

Last Spring, I was trying to figure out how to do a backdrop set for a Cowboy VBS program, and the jocks sure came to my aide.

So, I thought, “why not ask the lumberjocks, maybe they have an idea of how I can use the Wheels.”

If you have an idea, please comment below.

Thanks,
Mark DeCou
www.decoustudio.com

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-- Mark DeCou - American Contemporary Craft Artisan - www.decoustudio.com



17 comments so far

View Roger Strautman's profile

Roger Strautman

656 posts in 3593 days


#1 posted 10-10-2007 01:57 AM

I don’t know what to do with the wheels but I’ll take that 1962 or 1963 Galaxie 500. I could be off a few years. LOL!

-- " All Things At First Appear Difficult"

View Karson's profile

Karson

35034 posts in 3860 days


#2 posted 10-10-2007 01:58 AM

Well Mark I’ve been looking for a set of wheels and axles. To be semi correct the wheels need to be 4’ high and have about an 8” wide tread.

I’ve been asked to make a Beach cart for the Indian River Life Saving Service Musiuem in Delaware. I have been unsuccessful to find anything here.

And I don’t know if I want to be a wheelsmith.

Good luck on your searching.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware soon moving to Virginia karsonwm@gmail.com †

View Obi's profile

Obi

2213 posts in 3696 days


#3 posted 10-10-2007 03:18 AM

Duh, Mark. When you have a set of wheels, you build a wagon… Who cares if they match or not?

View Dan'um Style's profile

Dan'um Style

14167 posts in 3442 days


#4 posted 10-10-2007 03:57 AM

If money is no object ….

Get them sand blasted and nickle plated.

Use them arms as sides of a handmade red leather art deco moderne recliner sofa.
Real cool streamlined shape.
Like a watermelon curve.
Pleated rolled and tucked leather.
White piping.
Black buttons

-- keeping myself entertained ... Humor and fun lubricate the brain

View Dan'um Style's profile

Dan'um Style

14167 posts in 3442 days


#5 posted 10-10-2007 04:03 AM

or you could leaved them rusted and

use hair-on-horse-hide and make a cowboy chair.

Burled hardwood frame. Big Big Big bronze headed tacks. Red blacket wool big button accents.

Sort of Rancho Delux.

Thomas Molesworth.

-- keeping myself entertained ... Humor and fun lubricate the brain

View dennis mitchell's profile

dennis mitchell

3994 posts in 3774 days


#6 posted 10-10-2007 04:49 AM

Use some old barnwood for some garden benches on wheels for the next lumberjock picnic..

View Mark A. DeCou's profile

Mark A. DeCou

2008 posts in 3865 days


#7 posted 10-10-2007 01:04 PM

You are correct Roger, a 1963 Galaxie, all original, excellent interior, no dents, 70,000 miles. It has the 352 cuin V8 with 4-Barrel. Runs like a little kitten, prrrrrrrr.

We bought it for Shelli to drive every day, which she did. Then when Rachel was born we needed rear seat belts so we bought the Intrepid.

The gold truck is a 1972 GMC Sierra.

The green truck in the back ground is a 1993 Ford Ranger with a great engine and bad transmission, ugh.

It is for sale, but not at a “giveaway” price. I did lose one hubcap, so that is a bummer. I found another at a hubcap heaven type place, but then I lost it again.

Karson: I didn’t measure the wheels, but they are shorter than 4’ in diameter, and about 4” wide tread. I’ve not seen wheels as big as you need.

Dan: I used to work in a plating shop, and I don’t think the wheels would nickel plate well. They have a lot of pores and socket joints that will drip out solution, spoiling the finish. I like the idea though, I’ve been looking at Art Deco ideas lately, looking for inspiration for some contemporary pieces. I think your Cowboy Chair is probably the closest to something I could imagine. I haven’t figured out how to use the wheels on a chair design yet, you know, the logistics of how to make it all fit together.

Dennis: I saw this piece in last year’s Western Design Conference. After seeing this bed, I have been looking in Farmer’s backyards for wheels.

Obi: I’ll get a photo of the second set of wheels, and see what you think.

Good ideas folks.

-- Mark DeCou - American Contemporary Craft Artisan - www.decoustudio.com

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

18615 posts in 3620 days


#8 posted 10-10-2007 01:22 PM

garden cart
love the bed and chair ideas

-- ~ Debbie, Canada (https://www.facebook.com/DebbiePribeleENJOConsultant)

View Thos. Angle's profile

Thos. Angle

4445 posts in 3422 days


#9 posted 10-10-2007 02:54 PM

Mark,
I’ve seen a couch made from these, like Dan suggests. Also a garden bench. They could be used to support a glass table top using the axle for a pedestal. There is no shortage of new wheels. Most are made in the Amish country in Northern Indiana and the three county area in Ohio. It appears that the wheels on the bed Mark shows have been rebuilt using old hubs. The problem is matching the boxings in the wheels with the axles. A lot of these steel wheels were sold as replacements for worn out wooden wheels in the ‘20’s and ‘30’s. You can get new wheels from Pioneer Equipment Co., even whole wagons.

Karson, for what you need it would be best to get some new buggy wheels with hard rubber tires. Seldom are the old ones in good enough shape to hold up to use. With new ones you can get a good enough paint job to hold up to the salt water. If any of you are interested I’ll dig out the info I have on wheels and carriages.
Tom

-- Thos. Angle, Jordan Valley, Oregon

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

18615 posts in 3620 days


#10 posted 10-10-2007 03:11 PM

interesting that this is posted this week – Rick came home from one of his “pick ups” yesterday (they get furniture made by Mennonites in the region) and he was telling me about the wooden wheels that he saw at one of the shops.

-- ~ Debbie, Canada (https://www.facebook.com/DebbiePribeleENJOConsultant)

View jpw1995's profile

jpw1995

376 posts in 3757 days


#11 posted 10-10-2007 05:40 PM

I love that truck. I’ve got a 1970 Chevrolet C-10 that’s very similar to yours. 192,000 miles and still going. I use it for all my trips to the lumber yard.

-- JP, Louisville, KY

View Dan'um Style's profile

Dan'um Style

14167 posts in 3442 days


#12 posted 10-10-2007 07:33 PM

another idea is a wagon wheel light fixture

-- keeping myself entertained ... Humor and fun lubricate the brain

View Karson's profile

Karson

35034 posts in 3860 days


#13 posted 10-11-2007 12:49 AM

The wheels that I’m referring to would be used on a cart like a rickshaw but pulled in sand so the tread is about 5” wide so it wouldn’t sink in the sand.

The Life Saving Service was the beginning of the U.S. Coast Guard
and

Beach Cart:

The Federal requirements of around 1875 were:

Wheels, extreme diameter, four (4) feet. The rims to be of well seasoned white oak, or second growth chestnut, 5 inches tread by 1 3/4 inches thick. Tires of No.8 band iron, two on each wheel placed 1 1/2 inches asunder, and each shrunken and securely fastened to the rims by No. 14 iron screws, between every other spoke. The hubs to be of elm, 7 1/2 inches long by 5 1/4 inches in diameter, fitted No 12 iron banks, 1 3/4 inches wide and projecting outside the rim of the hub 3/4 of an inch. Spokes fourteen in number for each wheel, to be of hickory, 1 1/2 inches wide at the hub, 1 3/4 inches at the rim, and 7/8 inches thick. The axle to be of iron, 5 feet in length, and 1 1/4 inches square between the hubs, excepting in the center, where it must be flattened down to 1 inch in depth. In the hubs, it is to be rounded, and from 1 1/4 or 1 1/8 inches diameter, tapering toward the end to 7/8 of an inch, and threaded for a nut, which have a flange 1 7/8 inches diameter, and be 1 1/4 inches square.

They went on from there stating how it should be fastened to the cart.

I understand that an original cart is in a museum about 30 miles from here. I’m trying to get there to see it and measure it. and take pictures of it. It in a building that is not open to the public.

The final page of the requirements state materials and workmanship to be subject to inspection, and , when completed, the whole to be delivered, without additional expense to the Government, at such railroad depot or steamboat landing as may be designated, in the vicinity of the place manufactured.

They didn’t state the price to the Government.

The picture of the Beach Cart seems to be an all metal wheel instead of a wooden wheel.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware soon moving to Virginia karsonwm@gmail.com †

View Thos. Angle's profile

Thos. Angle

4445 posts in 3422 days


#14 posted 10-11-2007 02:59 AM

Karson, I didn’t catch the part about it being for a museum. Those wheels in the photo are steel wheels. Only guess I’d have would be to contact a wheelwright and see what he had to say. That would be some felloe if you had to cut them. But do-able. Most of the spokes are turned on double centers to make an oval spoke. Today the problem is always the hub. It is supposed to be of Elm and the Elm disease amost eliminated them. Spokes are ash and the felloes can be Ash, Hickory or Oak For a museum you could probably use something else for the hubs. Luckily now days Rockler and Woodcraft and ??? sell she-augers to do the end of spokes. Forresners take care of the he-auger dept. Sorry Mark, we didn’t mean to highjack your thread. If you’re interested, Karson, I can probably come up with enough info for you to do this.

-- Thos. Angle, Jordan Valley, Oregon

View Fine's profile

Fine

11 posts in 2394 days


#15 posted 06-02-2010 04:57 AM

Here is what I did with my wagon axle….hope it helps.
http://lumberjocks.com/projects/32824

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