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First mortise/tenon #2: Second mortise tenon try

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Blog entry by Craftsman on the lake posted 03-03-2009 11:22 PM 1085 reads 0 times favorited 9 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 1: Practice mortise and tenon joint Part 2 of First mortise/tenon series Part 3: freud raised cabinet bits arrive »

The first mortise/tenon was made with junk pine. Someone said that hardwood might give me better results so, I grabbed a couple of pieces of oak and went to work. Here’s the results. I guess practice makes perfect. I should do a half dozen more but I want to make a cabinet with two doors for my sister. Today I jointed, cut, and planed the wood. Next is to take it and make mortises for the front frame. This is all new territory for me.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.



9 comments so far

View Kindlingmaker's profile

Kindlingmaker

2654 posts in 2251 days


#1 posted 03-03-2009 11:36 PM

Daniel Do you have a sharp blade in your table saw? Are you using a dado blade or jig or the single kerf hog out method (running the single blade back and forth to remove the wood)? All of these methods work if everything is measured, aligned and the blades are sharp. Your mortise still looks better than mine but have you tried a router?

-- Never board, always knotty, lots of growth rings

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8476 posts in 2373 days


#2 posted 03-03-2009 11:43 PM

looks much better, like riding a bike… it’ll get better and better, easier and easier.

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View DaleM's profile

DaleM

923 posts in 2108 days


#3 posted 03-03-2009 11:43 PM

It looks good from what I can see in the picture. Is it snug? In the past, if I had made the mortise too wide/tenon too thin, I would use my plane to shave down some scrap wood and glue laminates to the side of the tenon to tighten it up a bit, but last night I found a new use for my Woodslicer blade; I resawed paper thin laminates from the side of a piece of pine. I’m talking so thin I could easily see light through it. I used it to laminate some tenons and they fit perfectly now. Man, that blade is awesome! I’m not suggesting your tenons don’t fit well, but sometimes mine don’t, so it’s nice to know there is an easy fix available.

-- Dale Manning, Carthage, NY

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

2409 posts in 2162 days


#4 posted 03-03-2009 11:58 PM

The mortise was made with a forstner bit and cleaned up with a chisel. The tenon was made on my table saw using a dado. Arrived today, a new Bosch fixed/plunge router. Waiting for the table plate to arrive. When that setup is installed I can see where it might be better for the tenon.

Thanks for the critique’s

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

View teenagewoodworker's profile

teenagewoodworker

2727 posts in 2493 days


#5 posted 03-04-2009 03:20 AM

hmm… you might want to look at a video i made on mortise and tenons. yours are looking really good as it is but that whole drawboreing thing that i go over can really come in handy

http://lumberjocks.com/jocks/teenagewoodworker/blog/5976

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

2409 posts in 2162 days


#6 posted 03-04-2009 05:11 AM

Teenage, you can bet I already checked out your video along with many other.
Great Dan, Still amazing that lining up something like a Forstner bit still can be of center no matter what I try.

I’ve been looking at the loose tenon stuff. This seems like a really unique and good way to get a tenon joint going. I’m going to make a jig to give it a try. One of our own LJ’s has a personal blog site with great instruction on how it’s done. Interesting.

http://thecraftsmanspath.com/2007/09/25/loose-tenon-joinery-budget-alternative-festool-domino/

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

View davidroberts's profile

davidroberts

1004 posts in 2211 days


#7 posted 03-04-2009 05:24 AM

Daniel, what’s the problem. Joint looks clean and tight. That’s what counts. I obsess over parts no one will ever see. Bad habit. Each MT will look better and better on the inside, as well. I always mill down to about an 1/8th to 3/16 oversized and let the sticks sit a week or so, then mill to final dimension. It a pain to mill twice but the sticks will be straight. If you are worried about 1/32 slits and openings here and there, just apply your stain or oil with fine sandpaper. Any tiny openings will fill right up. You never know. Show us more…

-- God is great, wood is good. Let us thank Him for wood......and old hand tools.

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

2409 posts in 2162 days


#8 posted 03-04-2009 06:39 AM

Hmmm….. I look at some of the joints here and other places and they look so clean and square. Tahnks Dave.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

View Kindlingmaker's profile

Kindlingmaker

2654 posts in 2251 days


#9 posted 03-04-2009 06:37 PM

Daniel, I just had a thought… I have not tried this but what if a doweling jig were used to drill the mortise holes then clean them out. The doweling jig at HF costs about $8 bucks on sale and centers on the wood perfectly. ...just another thought.

-- Never board, always knotty, lots of growth rings

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