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Enclosed Cherry Raised Panel Bench #5: New top and skirt!

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Blog entry by Craftsman on the lake posted 03-15-2013 11:10 PM 1000 reads 0 times favorited 17 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 4: Remaining panels glued up and then box assembled Part 5 of Enclosed Cherry Raised Panel Bench series Part 6: All sanded and yet to be horned rail glued up »

The past couple of days I made some more progress. I used my raised panel router bit to made a cove type molding for the skirt around the bottom of the bench/chest. it sits on the chest in a rabit cut into the back of the skirt. After gluing it on I decided it needed some reinforcing so that it wouldn’t get broken under the weight of people sitting on it. I cut some oak strips and glued and screwed them under the chest and against the molding.
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With all of these joints it will take awhile sanding and cleaning it up before finishing.

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Next, while that was all gluing up I took the top that I had previously glued together and squared it off and cut it to size. I used my smoothing plane and stanley 80 scraper to smooth it down and then sanded it to 80 grit. I was going to put an ogee edge on it but with the cove skirt on the bottom I decided a cove edge would match better.
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-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.



17 comments so far

View RussellAP's profile

RussellAP

2954 posts in 952 days


#1 posted 03-15-2013 11:17 PM

I love Cherry. Is there any other wood that looks so crisp and neat?

Good looking cabinet.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

2390 posts in 2104 days


#2 posted 03-15-2013 11:27 PM

I agree Russ… For me hard maple cuts a super nice edge too.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

View Tim Dahn's profile

Tim Dahn

1471 posts in 2231 days


#3 posted 03-15-2013 11:39 PM

The cove molding is a nice addition and the cove profile on the top is a good match.

-- Good judgement comes from experience and experience comes from poor judgement.

View RussellAP's profile

RussellAP

2954 posts in 952 days


#4 posted 03-16-2013 12:31 AM

I must get some maple, my sawyer has been a bit lazy lately, I’ll have to get on him. He owes me a 4 inch walnut slab, and a 4 inch box elder slab for blanks. Before all that I told him I wanted him to cut me up a maple tree, which is still laying in his front yard.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

10980 posts in 1356 days


#5 posted 03-16-2013 01:15 AM

Beautiful! Good call on the cove for the top. The oak strips should stouten it up. Is it going to have feet or will that molding be on the floor?

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

2390 posts in 2104 days


#6 posted 03-16-2013 01:18 AM

I was planning on it being on the floor gfadvm. If I find it uneven I could always add some small feet underneath maybe 1/4”.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

View grizzman's profile

grizzman

7035 posts in 1969 days


#7 posted 03-16-2013 01:52 AM

it looks beautiful, i have to agree on the comments on the cherry, its a beautiful wood to work with and its just beautiful, i thank god all the time for such a variety of woods to work with…any decisions on the red cedar for the bottom…just tell it to me gently, im a little fragile these days..;)........grizz

-- GRIZZMAN ...[''''']

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

10980 posts in 1356 days


#8 posted 03-16-2013 03:22 AM

I asked that because I would have run the oak all the way to the floor so they would bear the weight rather than the trim. Or add some feet that extend 1/4” past your trim to protect it.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

2390 posts in 2104 days


#9 posted 03-16-2013 05:43 AM

Ah… good idea.. I just had some strips of oak from a long time ago that look like they’d be about the right size trimmed up a bit. Scraps you shouldn’t save and never use but I managed to find a spot for them.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

View Ken90712's profile

Ken90712

14978 posts in 1855 days


#10 posted 03-16-2013 02:34 PM

Nice job, miters and skirt. Looking really good… How fun working with Cherry!!!!

Ok I’m caught up now :>)

-- Ken, "Everyday above ground is a good day!"

View stefang's profile

stefang

13101 posts in 2000 days


#11 posted 03-16-2013 03:27 PM

Nice work and nice wood. I haven’t got much experience with cherry, but they say it burns easy while being worked with table saws and routers. It doesn’t look like you had that problem though.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

2390 posts in 2104 days


#12 posted 03-16-2013 05:38 PM

Even a small router bit like the one I did the cove cut in the top with. You drop your router speed to 1-2 or as low as you need to the burning will stop. Fast turning bits are the reason for burning. You have to go slower to give it time to cut but I keep cutting down the speed until I get no burn. Now I’ve done it enough so that I can pretty much guess the speed by looking at the wood and the size of the bit. This one was set at 1 1/2 on my bosch router and it cut without burning. The bit is small and can easily handle a speed of 3 (out of 5 max) but slower stops the burn.
A table saw.. well that’s another story. At least it’s a flat cut to sand and I can always put the edge through a light pass of the jointer or use my jointer plane to remove the burn stains.

I recently finished about 30 raised panel oak doors. I’ll be posting this kitchen project when it’s finished. I used the same router bit as shown above in the first picture. That big bit has to run slow anyway because of its size, but by cutting the speed from 1 to about 3/4 I had to push it through more slowly but it eliminated burn. Sanding the burn marks out of curves surfaces that large on 30+ cabinet doors would have been an all day chore. Slowing down a bit takes longer but save tons of time in the long run.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

View grizzman's profile

grizzman

7035 posts in 1969 days


#13 posted 03-16-2013 08:09 PM

wow dan, just totally ignore me and my question…ok…i guess that was as gentle as it comes…well its still a beauty of a box..

-- GRIZZMAN ...[''''']

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

2390 posts in 2104 days


#14 posted 03-16-2013 09:41 PM

I’m not ignoring you Grizz… It’s just that the question is so important and deep that I decided to write it down in front of me and stare at it for at least one hour a day to let it sink in. I figure I’ll have a better chance of making the right decision after that.

The answer to date: I dunno yet!

;-)

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

10980 posts in 1356 days


#15 posted 03-17-2013 12:32 AM

Dan, If you think cherry burns easily, try some mulberry! It burns if you even look hard at it! I found that mineral spirits makes it easier to sand out the burn marks. I’ve always heard that high sugar content is what makes wood burn easily.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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