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Blog entry by Craftsman on the lake posted 1245 days ago 1038 reads 0 times favorited 14 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Probably better in Home refurbers but I’m on LJ’s so the project is here and under blog because it’s not a specific woodworking project.

Some of my acquaintances on LJ’s have been asking where I’ve been. Well I’ve been lurking lately and I’ve been busy for about 10 weeks. A young couple in the area had the shell for a house put up and asked me to finish off the interior. It was basically a blank slate. They had the sheetrocking done and someone has been doing the painting. I got everything else, wood and tile floors, doors, trim, kitchen and baths, stairs, along with most every other little odds and ends. It was fun. The decor was their direction so I don’t get much credit for the style. But I made their whims.

I must divulge that I didn’t make the kitchen cabinets, only installed them. But I made or installed nearly everything. Just me and my radio each day. All alone. The pictures are of a nearly completed house. The granite countertop isn’t on yet and the painter still has some stuff drop clothed to stain.

So, for those who have asked; This is where I’ve been.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.



14 comments so far

View chrisstef's profile

chrisstef

10694 posts in 1638 days


#1 posted 1245 days ago

If i had to do all that work you wouldnt have seen me for about a year. Nice work youve done there .. love that knotty pine is makin a come back!

-- "there aren’t many hand tools as awe-inspiring as the #8 jointer. I mean, it just reeks of cast iron heft and hubris" - Smitty

View William's profile

William

8976 posts in 1474 days


#2 posted 1245 days ago

I can’t help it. I keep having to scroll back up and see that beautiful ceiling. Nice work on everything.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

2382 posts in 2069 days


#3 posted 1245 days ago

Ha William. Here in Maine you can’t turn around without bumping into a 75 foot white pine tree. I rarely work with it and the stuff with knots is considered nearly worthless as it’s well, got knots and is soft so it squashes when worked in the shop. It’s great for framing cabinet carcasses though. We’d burn it but it’s so soft it goes up like paper. It pops and crackles nicely in an open fire though.

thanks for the comments. The ceiling reaches 28 feet.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

View SASmith               's profile

SASmith

1571 posts in 1619 days


#4 posted 1245 days ago

I have to agree with william. The ceiling is beautiful and at 28’ very impressive. The staircase is not too shabby either. Thanks for sharing.
Scott

-- Scott Smith, Southern Illinois

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8476 posts in 2280 days


#5 posted 1245 days ago

very very cool stuff Daniel. I love the wood trims and warm feel it gives the house (at least in the pictures)

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View William's profile

William

8976 posts in 1474 days


#6 posted 1245 days ago

You say the knots make it worthless? I say the knots make it beautiful.
And twenty eight feet? In these neck of the woods, twelve foot ceilings are tall.
Is there a difference between this white pine and the pine we have here in the south? While lighter in color, what I see in the pictures reminds me more of antique heart pine. Here in the south, they seldom let the pines get large enough to get knotty appearance like that. If they do, I sure haven’t seen it.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

2382 posts in 2069 days


#7 posted 1245 days ago

William, the edge of the wall is exactly 12 ft. then the pine starts from there.
I don’t know about the southern pine. I do know that our pressure treated lumber is made of what we call southern yellow pine. It is actually yellowish and splits easily, sort of a hard wood. White pine, if you have cabinets made with it you can dent it with a good hard thumbnail. So, eventually your cabinets have dents in them. Most of our pine has knots. It’s considered #2 or 3 or 4 and get cheap as it gets knottier. The knotless select stuff is pretty expensive. You can tell what’s common to an area by visiting a big box store. here up north it’s all pine boards in the board section Then there’s some expensive red oak, some rock maple, and poplar. Stuff like walnut is never seen unless you go to a place that sells hardwood lumber.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

View ellen35's profile

ellen35

2566 posts in 2064 days


#8 posted 1244 days ago

Geez Dan… you knocked that off and couldn’t make the kitchen cabinets and stay on LJ??? What’s with you… getting old ;-)
Great to have you back and that house is gorgeous!! The ceiling is great and that railing and hallway… just incredible!
Ellen

-- "Don't let the perfect be the enemy of the good." Voltaire

View Grandpa's profile

Grandpa

3095 posts in 1307 days


#9 posted 1244 days ago

The home does look good. All that is left now is finishing up…right? In my area of the country white pine is expensive. It is used for a paint grade material in some cabinets and such. I don’t care for it there because it does dent as you have pointed out. White pine and a 2 year old in in 3 years your house looks like a giant dent. Those little guys have to grow up too and we were all there once. In this are athough, good white pine and red oak sell for about the same price. Get a grip of that! Yellow pine is a little cheaper. I suppose it is shipping that makes the difference.
You should be proud of your accomplishment. I would still be looking for my box of nails. LOL

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

2382 posts in 2069 days


#10 posted 1244 days ago

Grandpa,
What doesn’t show in the pictures is the 32×34 foot garage that was empty when I worked. I literally brought all my tools there and had everything on hand that I needed. Miter saw, all my hand/powertools and I’ve got an old smaller rockwell table saw that I’ve refurbished, put wheels on and keep for moving around like this. So, I almost had my shop at the place. When you can do that it really helps. When I took off on the last day my pickup was heaped full.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

View William's profile

William

8976 posts in 1474 days


#11 posted 1244 days ago

You nailed it. Southern yellow pine is exactly as you describe. It’s soft, but it does split easily. I refuse to use it on anything unless I plan to predrill and screw every joint. It doesn’t glue. It doesn’t take nails well (it does for construction sake, I’m talking finished look here). It doesn’t take screws well (unless predrilled from my expererience). I was at Home Depot just an hour ago and checked. It is labeled southern yellow pine.
Maybe it’s the town I live in. I’ve already cotten two PMs from my comments here from others that love the stuff. I see where the southern yellow pine has a place, esepcially in homes locally. All I’m saying it as far as beauty goes, it doesn’t hold a candle to what you have on that ceiling. It is truly beautiful.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View Vicki's profile

Vicki

937 posts in 1976 days


#12 posted 1244 days ago

Great remodeling job. I love all the wood and even their paint colors.

The cabinets look like some doors have bead board and some are plain. Is that accurate?

I’m going to have my kitchen redone and like bead board and the plain, but hadn’t thought about mixing them.

-- Vicki on the Eastern Shore of MD

View William's profile

William

8976 posts in 1474 days


#13 posted 1244 days ago

It looked like the door patterns were mismatched to me too. I didn’t say anything because I thought maybe it was just the camera angle. I went back and looked again though. I don’t think camera angle would account for some of the differences I see. It still looks good though.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

2382 posts in 2069 days


#14 posted 1243 days ago

Yes William,

Here in the north you can’t buy southern Yellow pine in the stores unless it’s pressure treated lumber. If figure all the pressure treated stuff comes from the south. We have pine boards but all our framing material is either spruce which works well for framing but also tends to split some, and fir.

Must be the angle because all the patterns in the doors are the sme

Vicki: yes the lower ones are bead board doors in the kitchen. I like the plain maple at the top.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

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