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Convertible Wall Easel #2: Assembly

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Blog entry by Craftsman on the lake posted 02-22-2017 11:05 PM 782 reads 0 times favorited 3 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 1: Wall Rails Part 2 of Convertible Wall Easel series Part 3: Framing the table and canvas supports »

Remember from the first installment, this is a convertible wall easel. It can be used vertically for oil painting or turned into a desk for watercolor painting. All will become clearer nearer the bottom of this blog when assembly begins.

Here are the holes where the support rods and bearing will install from. It’s the top of the easel.


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I thought I’d glue the top up to be ready to work on later. It will have a cherry border and plexiglass top when finished.


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Lots of support pieces ready to drill and fit.


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The next three pictures show the sleeve bearing that goes through two support arms and bolted together. The sleeve keeps them from being tightened too much. Just enough to hold with no slop. A locknut is on the other side.


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This is the whole bolting unit as it would be assembled inside the wood.
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Pivot brace glued and pocket holed to the table top. The small piece is offset so that the bottom arm can be in the same plane as the top one.


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The back side of the easel. It’s just standing up now but this is the side that will be bolted to the wall in the house by the top and bottom crossmembers.


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Three pictures of how the pivoting table support members are assembled.

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The knob tightens and this section is held in place at any location up or down the easel.

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The front of the easel in it’s upright, oil painting position. Remember, it will be bolted to a wall in the house.


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The top (table) pivoted downward and allowed to rest in the table or water color painting position.


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A view from behind.


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Another view of the bearing inside the rails to hopefully make the sliding up and down smoother.

Let’s see, what’s left. Cherry frame around the plexiglass that will go over the table. Then a bottom lip to hold a canvas when in the upright position and a raisable center post to hold the top part of the canvas.

Then of course my usual coats of poly after more sanding.

Till next time.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.



3 comments so far

View johnhutchinson's profile

johnhutchinson

1243 posts in 1801 days


#1 posted 02-23-2017 02:13 AM

Just me, but …
If the friction of the knobs against the vertical rails is the only thing holding the top in position, it might be a little dangerous. Rather than being infinitely adjustable, why not a series of positive stops between full-vertical and full-horizontal?
Am I missing something?

-- John - Central Ohio - "too much is never enough"

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

2817 posts in 3609 days


#2 posted 02-23-2017 12:11 PM



Just me, but …
If the friction of the knobs against the vertical rails is the only thing holding the top in position, it might be a little dangerous. Rather than being infinitely adjustable, why not a series of positive stops between full-vertical and full-horizontal?
Am I missing something?

- johnhutchinson

Thanks for the comment. The knob pulls on the entire rod so both rails are locked by the bearings and the knob. The threaded rods are also enclosed by a metal tube, which I didn’t indicate that I put over it. So the ends and the inside walls are all snugged up. The outside of one rail and the insides of the rails are seeing friction. It’s pretty tight. Another reason for ‘infinitely adjustable’ is that in the vertical position I want some leeway as to what level the canvas is. A large one might be lower. A small one higher.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

View Brodan's profile

Brodan

142 posts in 1474 days


#3 posted 02-23-2017 05:46 PM

Craftsman, that looks great. I also include oil painting as one of my hobbies. We recently downsized and space is at a premium in the new place. No room for my freestanding easle in my home office. Your wall mounted adjustable solution is a terrific idea. And of course as usual your workmanship is fantastic.

-- Dan, TN

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