LumberJocks

mitre jig

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by dclark1943 posted 01-21-2014 10:05 PM 1017 reads 8 times favorited 14 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Recently Big Al, i.e. “Boxguy” posted a jig he had built for cutting accurate mitre joints. I built one this afternoon, and thought I would share my attempt at making the same jig. Total cost for the jig was around $17.00 – - the all in one clamp. The time was 2 1/2 hours. MDF remnants, left over material from other projects, and junk drawer parts finished it to this point. Still have to finish up the stop system, but was anxious to use it today, so will add the stop tomorrow.

the position of the plane handles really make it easy to use & safe. I cut one box this afternoon and the joint was “dead on” perfectly square and a perfect 45ยบ —I’m a happy camper, as just the elimination of cranking the blade over was my goal; and the repeatable precision is of course the grail ! Going to use it for a while to find any “bugs” then will make a “pretty” one out of a more durable material.

-- Dave, Kansas City



14 comments so far

View Pie's profile

Pie

187 posts in 2062 days


#1 posted 01-21-2014 10:22 PM

Very nice, looking forward to the “polished” version. Thx for posting.

-- Pie

View Boxguy's profile

Boxguy

1474 posts in 924 days


#2 posted 01-22-2014 12:01 AM

Dave,

Your jig is a great job and looks familiar. I like the handles you used. Thanks for the mention. I sure got tired of cranking the blade over before I came up with this concept. Glad to know it works for you.

Did you have any particular problems in the build?

The stop is important for repeatable cuts like the sides of a box. So, don’t leave it out. When you add your stop, if you can have the stop extend below the back of the slanting board.

When you cut a 45 you need to spin the board around and just the point of the end pushes against your stop. So, if your stop extends down a bit it will catch that pointed edge and prevent the point from sliding under your stop and making the board too long.

It is also important to have the clamp well above the cut line so that the off fall from the board you are cutting can ride on the table a bit away from the saw blade and above the table. This also allows you to cut about 2 inches off the board you are mitering if you need to.

Don’t forget to use safety glasses when cutting box sides. The little pieces between the dado groove and the outside of the box tend to go flying when you cut them off. For that reason it is important to move the fence well away from the blade when you use the jig. The cut off pieces need room to wander around the table so they don’t bind up between the fence and the blade.

Keep me posted if you come up with any improvements on the design. I’ll add your thoughts to the post and credit you.

-- Big Al in IN

View Roger's profile

Roger

14608 posts in 1461 days


#3 posted 01-22-2014 12:20 AM

Looks like a winner for sure. I’m gonna have to do up one o these, one o these days. I don’t think you need any polish, but, I know it seems the better looking the tool, the more use it gets. :)

-- Roger from KY. Work/Play/Travel Safe. Kentuk55@bellsouth.net

View dclark1943's profile

dclark1943

156 posts in 844 days


#4 posted 01-22-2014 12:41 AM

Al, I didn’t run into any problems in the build. I plan on a dado cut in the bed so that the adjustable stop will extend below the bed surface to insure the mitered end doesn’t slip below the stop. I think everything else you mentioned I got covered. When I get the stop installed, I’ll post another photo. Thanks again for the inspiration and the blog to “splain” it all to me. : )

-- Dave, Kansas City

View poospleasures's profile

poospleasures

339 posts in 1141 days


#5 posted 01-22-2014 01:07 AM

Good looking jig. This is the most accurate miter jig style I have used. I made mine many years ago and did intend on making a good looking one but was afraid it would not work as well. Another thing I did was put a slot on each side of the base over the runner to be able to move the jig closer to the blade as the cutting edge slowly gets cut away and will not give a clean cut. I make a lot of boxes and have only moved it once in about 4 years but it saved making a new jig. Good job. Thanks

-- I love the smell of sawdust in the morning. Vernon

View cabmaker's profile

cabmaker

1311 posts in 1466 days


#6 posted 01-22-2014 01:54 AM

I’ve seen a lot of contraptions on this site and I gotta tell you I rate your sled up there at the top! Appears extremely user friendly, repeatable and designed for accuracy!

Well done!

JB

View majeagle1's profile

majeagle1

1417 posts in 2153 days


#7 posted 01-22-2014 01:58 AM

Dave, this is a great jig and I have been wanting to try one for quite awhile. I have a question though….. and hopefully Big Al will chime in as well. Maybe I have a mind block somewhere, but…...
when I make boxes, I try to “wrap” the grain around the box. I usually cut my miters on a miter sled ( flat ) and that has a top on it and I just flip the board over for each length. ( hope this makes sense ). I really like the idea of your jig but cannot figure out how, if I have a board 42 ” long, I make my first miter cut, no problem, then I want my next miter cut to be on a box side exactly 9 inches, but I want the grain to wrap so each cut must be made consecutively.
It appears by using your jig, you could not do that because you could not “flip” the board end to end and do this.
Am I missing something, or am I just having a bad senior moment !!!??? wish there was a video of this, would clear up my befuddled mind…..., tks, Gene

-- Gene, Majestic Eagle Woodworks, http://majesticeagleww.etsy.com/, http://www.flickr.com/photos/majesticeagle/

View dclark1943's profile

dclark1943

156 posts in 844 days


#8 posted 01-22-2014 04:50 AM

Cabmaker, Want to clarify that I just copied “Big Al” i.e. “Boxguy” who originally posted this project on his blog some time ago.

Majeagle1, AS I understand your question, you wouldn’t be able to cut a 42” board on this jig, you would have to cut the sides to length, then cut the miters. – - I think; if I understand your question correctly.

-- Dave, Kansas City

View Boxguy's profile

Boxguy

1474 posts in 924 days


#9 posted 01-22-2014 03:52 PM

Gene, Dave is exactly correct. You first cut the lengths and then use this jig to undercut the ends with a 45. I found that it took more time to cut each end twice, but it was far more accurate and the jig gave me exact lengths when I used the stop. It also lets you wrap the grain in an exact match on three of the four corners.

The other advantage of the two-cut method is that you can see the board, and if you have some extra length you can slide your starting point a bit to the left or right to show features or avoid a knot on the corner of your box.

Gene, I looked at your projects. Your boxes are wonderfully done. I especially like the rosewood with the medallion. I also read your personal note about recent family health complications. I am learning that as we get older such things fall to most of us. Glad you are back in your shop making beautiful boxes. Isn’t time a precious commodity?

-- Big Al in IN

View Boxguy's profile

Boxguy

1474 posts in 924 days


#10 posted 01-22-2014 04:24 PM

Dave, I looked through your projects again and was impressed anew at your inlays and designs. What nice work you do. Keep boxing and keep posting.

-- Big Al in IN

View majeagle1's profile

majeagle1

1417 posts in 2153 days


#11 posted 01-22-2014 04:42 PM

Dave and Big Al,
Yes indeed, you have both answered my questions and addressed my concerns, thanks so much.
My concern was exactly that if I make 2 cuts, I may loose enough material to not allow the corners to
match / wrap. I can see by your example pic that that is not an issue.
Thanks so much for the kind words, yes it has been a rough year, but now through it and back in the shop.
I should be posing another big jewelry chest in a month or so, then will be back to some true “boxing” in the shop.
So much looking forward to getting back to making sawdust and paying more attention to my family here on LJ’s!!!

-- Gene, Majestic Eagle Woodworks, http://majesticeagleww.etsy.com/, http://www.flickr.com/photos/majesticeagle/

View dclark1943's profile

dclark1943

156 posts in 844 days


#12 posted 01-24-2014 01:48 AM

Well, I got back in the shop today and finished up the stop system:

Went to woodcraft and picked up a Kreg 24” mini Trak, a T-bolt and a knob. Cut a dado to let it into the center of the inclined support; and built a sliding stop out of MDF and Baltic Birch. They didn’t have a adhesive backed tape, so I will have to pick that up and run it down the incline so I can set the stop without a ruler.

I noted in Big Al’s blog that he recommended that the stop sit below the bed of the inclined support so that when you flip the board to cut the second mitre, the first mitre doesn’t slip below the stop. this picture shows that I cut a shallow dado and left a small “skirt” on the stop that rides down in the dado to keep the piece from slipping under the stop.

Looking at it from the top,you can see that the board cannot slip under the stop!

Here’s a gander from the back side. This thing works like a charm; Thanks to Big Al for the tutorial. Things like this are the bread and butter of this organization; and I pick up something every time I log in and look around.
Keep cuttin and sandin : )

-- Dave, Kansas City

View majeagle1's profile

majeagle1

1417 posts in 2153 days


#13 posted 01-24-2014 03:54 AM

Lookin’ good Dave !!!! Thanks for the great pics also, sure makes it really clear for folks to understand.
I will be getting to my jig soon I hope and will incorporate a stop like this!

-- Gene, Majestic Eagle Woodworks, http://majesticeagleww.etsy.com/, http://www.flickr.com/photos/majesticeagle/

View dclark1943's profile

dclark1943

156 posts in 844 days


#14 posted 02-04-2014 06:31 PM

Here is the last “tweak” on my mitre jig:

Ordered a sticky back “right to left” ruler and “let it into the surface of the inclined support to enable setting the stop without trial and error or the use of a ruler. My thanks again to “Big Al” i.e. the boxguy for planting the seed and leading the way.

-- Dave, Kansas City

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase