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Daves Workshop #3: Using a cheap Harbor Freight riveter for awesome dust collection ductwork joints.

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Blog entry by dbhost posted 12-20-2016 03:01 AM 2636 reads 0 times favorited 7 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 2: Wiring basics. How to use a crimp butt splice. Part 3 of Daves Workshop series Part 4: Drill Master 68287 18v drill vs 3/4" auger bit and pine 2x4. Who will win? »

If you, like me have been putting your dust collection system together with screws, STOP IT, those screws stick into the duct work and can snag stringy stuff and clog things up for you. Not a good thing. In this video I show you a great, serviceable alternative to screws.


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-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com, YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCoa-AgyeFWqnQfGIJwdzkog



7 comments so far

View smitdog's profile

smitdog

256 posts in 1767 days


#1 posted 12-20-2016 03:24 PM

That’s a great way to keep shavings from getting hung up and a huge improvement over the long screws that were in there. I would hope nobody would use those long drywall screws like that to connect their DC system! I have yet to get a DC so I haven’t researched how to join the pipes but do those little 1/2” zip screws that you use on furnace ducting not work for some reason? I know they would protrude a little bit and the rivets certainly would make it near impossible to clog but I just wonder if the time installing/removing them is worth it compared to the zip screws? I guess it’s not like you’ll be taking the thing apart every day but I know those self tapping screws are lightning quick and would make for a super easy install if they don’t catch too much debris. The rivets are certainly the “smoothest” option next to gluing!

Thanks for the idea and video!

-- Jarrett - Mount Vernon, Ohio

View trevor7428's profile

trevor7428

220 posts in 622 days


#2 posted 12-20-2016 04:09 PM

I have a PVC piping dust collection system in my shop. All piping is only dry fitted together, not sure why anyone would use screws.

For the pieces that absolutely have to be secured together. I just used the normal PVC piping glue. Once its installed it won’t be coming apart until I move. At that point in time, if i cant reuse at new shop. I can just buy a couple new fittings, there not that expensive at H.D. or Lowes. Everything else is dry fitted to expand, if need be.

Not sure why you would use rivits instead of PVC glue, besides the look…I guess

-- Thank You Trevor OBrion

View Ted78's profile

Ted78

302 posts in 1661 days


#3 posted 12-20-2016 05:03 PM

Well there is more than one way to skin a cat. Personally I’d much rather use rivets than deal with the nasty pvc primer and cement and the smell and having to hold the pieces together for 20 or 30 seconds so cement setting doesn’t popl them apart. As far as screws go I guess if you had just the right length of screw they would hold securely without protruding, but unlike sheet metal ducting you’d still have to drill before the screw goes in and if you have to drill a hole anyway, the rivet goes in a quick as a screw.

-- Ted

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5665 posts in 2893 days


#4 posted 12-20-2016 05:27 PM

FWIW, I had used drywall screws that I had clipped off, but still had at least 1/2” intruding into the duct. I am giving full credit to Jim Bertelson for the idea and it was something so painfully obvious I should have seen as I am not exactly unfamiliar with riveting…

It’s a sign of wisdom when we can take other ideas and see their merits… Hopefully I have been wise…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com, YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCoa-AgyeFWqnQfGIJwdzkog

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5665 posts in 2893 days


#5 posted 12-20-2016 05:30 PM


I have a PVC piping dust collection system in my shop. All piping is only dry fitted together, not sure why anyone would use screws.

For the pieces that absolutely have to be secured together. I just used the normal PVC piping glue. Once its installed it won t be coming apart until I move. At that point in time, if i cant reuse at new shop. I can just buy a couple new fittings, there not that expensive at H.D. or Lowes. Everything else is dry fitted to expand, if need be.

Not sure why you would use rivits instead of PVC glue, besides the look…I guess

- trevor7428

Okay I will play. Say you get a clog in your system at some point. How are you going to clean it out? Rivets can be drilled out and new ones put in. PVC glue is pretty much permanent.

And not all ducting systems are PVC, you aren’t going to glue sheet metal together, and this works far better air flow wise than sheet metal screws…

I guess the pieces connecting the down pipes that have gravity trying all the time to yank them apart could be glued, and then the horizontal pieces without the physical forces against could be dry fitted.

More than one way to skin a cat I guess.

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com, YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCoa-AgyeFWqnQfGIJwdzkog

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

5264 posts in 2475 days


#6 posted 12-22-2016 05:10 PM

I bought both screws and pop rivets when I set up my dust collection, not sure which I would be using. I ended up using the rivets on my metal ductwork because it worked so well. Three or four rivets per joint and some foil tape did the trick.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

4059 posts in 2826 days


#7 posted 12-22-2016 05:47 PM

I actually have a similar riveting tool, about 20 years old. Since my DC system doesn’t use PVC, I don’t use fasteners much in the system, just clamps. I use one short pan head screw to obtain a more positive hold in places where a tool is attached to the system and movement occurs. They get removed with some frequency for various reasons, so screws work better there. For the majority of a PVC or metal system, rivets should work good. At bends where you are likely to get a blockage, short screws might be considered.

A PVC or metal system should give better air velocity, from what I have read. However, my shop has some tricky places to negotiate, and tends to be in some flux over time, so the rigid systems are not an option yet. I plan to revamp some of the shop arrangement over the next couple of years, and then with more permanence, a PVC system would be a better option for me as well.

Will put the DP on its mobile base today, and convert the old base into a mobile work table. It has an outlet box installed with a long heavy gauge cord, so it will be good for the new purpose.

Have a good day…

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

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