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Daves Workshop #2: Wiring basics. How to use a crimp butt splice.

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Blog entry by dbhost posted 12-19-2016 06:08 AM 2267 reads 0 times favorited 10 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 1: Fixing a dust collection ducting mistake. Part 2 of Daves Workshop series Part 3: Using a cheap Harbor Freight riveter for awesome dust collection ductwork joints. »

This applies to power tool wiring work as well. Any wiring connection that is going to be exposed to continued long term vibration. Splicing in a new switch? You need to know how to do this. Relocating that swtich? Same deal… This covers a basic skill that I am finding some people don’t have readily available…


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10 comments so far

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

4179 posts in 3192 days


#1 posted 12-19-2016 05:38 PM

I never liked the crush butt connectors much, although I have used them, and have some in the shop. I don’t do any automotive or motor home wiring work anymore, but when I did, I would normally solder the joint and then cover it with heat shrink tubing. When I install a crush terminal connector on anything, I always solder them as well as crush them.

For solid wire, I was taught to use a Western Union splice in my junior high school electrical shop course. But I tended to solder those as well. I operated mobile ham radio some, and the only way to eliminate reliability issues was to solder everything.

Soldering is easy here in Anchorage. I have a grounded temperature selectable Weller EC1002 soldering station all set to go at all times, as well as a Panavise and magnifying lamp. I also have an old Weller GT corded light weight solid state gun. It heats instantly and puts out a lot of heat. It resides in my electrical tote.

In La Conner, my setup is not as good. I will probably get a better device there eventually.

Later…

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

379 posts in 615 days


#2 posted 12-19-2016 05:58 PM

The only way to use crimp connectors properly is to have the mating racheting crimp tool. Hand crimping without the correct tool will cause fires in high current applications. If you use say Panduit connectors you need the Panduit tool. The Panduit crimper will emboss two circles on the terminal body so the connections can be inspected & verified.

A ‘factory’ running splice is soldered and covered with HS tubing – ‘factory’ never uses electrical tape.

M

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5726 posts in 3259 days


#3 posted 12-19-2016 11:14 PM

Jim I agree that a good solid solder joint with shrink tubing is far superior to a crush type butt splice, but you must agree from a safety perspective particularly when there is vibration concerned a crush type butt splice is far superior to Simply twisting and taping or even wire nutting a connection.

This particular video was done more or less for the specific individual I was mentioning his situation and the assumed skill-set more or less preclude quality safe soldering. I don’t know for sure but I don’t think he has any experience soldering and without much experience it’s hard to keep from dripping water everywhere and in that motor home it would not be all that good to have Globs of solder everywhere.

-- Please like and subscribe to my YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/c/daves-workshop

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5726 posts in 3259 days


#4 posted 12-20-2016 12:57 AM



The only way to use crimp connectors properly is to have the mating racheting crimp tool. Hand crimping without the correct tool will cause fires in high current applications. If you use say Panduit connectors you need the Panduit tool. The Panduit crimper will emboss two circles on the terminal body so the connections can be inspected & verified.

A factory running splice is soldered and covered with HS tubing – factory never uses electrical tape.

M

- Madmark2

We are talking 12v DC at .1 amps or so… And I wouldn’t considered crimps for higjh draw applications like a high power amp or a winch.

-- Please like and subscribe to my YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/c/daves-workshop

View papadan's profile

papadan

3584 posts in 3396 days


#5 posted 12-20-2016 01:13 AM

Soldering is the only proper way to splice wires in machinery to prevent loosening and shorting. I always use 2 pieces of heat shrink, one the length of the joint and another to cover past each end of the joint. I also use a label printer that prints on Heat shrink tubing so the splice is identified. Overkill, but safety first.

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

4179 posts in 3192 days


#6 posted 12-20-2016 02:51 AM

Hey Dan, nice to see you chiming in here. Long time no read… (-:

Obviously, I am in the overkill camp. And with things that are designed to move, I use two overlapping heat shrink tubes as well… interesting. I have even used three… ultimate overkill!!!

But as Dave notes, for low current situations, the crimped butt joint is better than simply wrapped. I don’t think I have ever done a simply wrapped and taped joint, even in high school due to the shop training in school.

.........off topic, but interesting, Dave….

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View papadan's profile

papadan

3584 posts in 3396 days


#7 posted 12-20-2016 02:57 AM

Hello Jim, been fighting some medical issues, but ain’t dead yet. I have used crimp connectors in automotive wireing. For solid wire the best thing next to solder is the twist on wire nuts, they do lock tight because of the spring in them.

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5726 posts in 3259 days


#8 posted 12-20-2016 03:32 AM



Hello Jim, been fighting some medical issues, but ain t dead yet. I have used crimp connectors in automotive wireing. For solid wire the best thing next to solder is the twist on wire nuts, they do lock tight because of the spring in them.

- papadan

Absolutely true. However when using stranded wire, wire nuts are one of the worst ideas as they just don’t hold fast.

I hand’t considered solid wire on this as in my experience automotive / RV applications use stranded, as well as the power tools I have worked on.

I personally wouldn’t and don’t hesitate to use crimp connectors on stranded wire applications Solder and shrink tube is best, but also most time and skill consuming.

For the applications I am trying to cover, there would be no factory running splice per se. At best soldered quick disconnect, but more likely crimped. (Ever looked at the switch connections on say a corded drill?)

-- Please like and subscribe to my YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/c/daves-workshop

View hairy's profile

hairy

2720 posts in 3559 days


#9 posted 12-21-2016 12:55 PM

I worked on city buses for 30 years. Butt splice connectors are used a lot. On the ones we had at work, the insulation is actually heat shrink tubing, thicker than regular heat shrink. Also, they are color coded, yellow for 10 ga. wire, blue for 16 ga. and red for 22 ga. wire. If done properly it is a very good fix. They are for basic component wiring, when you get into twisted pair, forget it, you change the wires.

-- My reality check bounced...

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5726 posts in 3259 days


#10 posted 12-22-2016 04:29 AM


I worked on city buses for 30 years. Butt splice connectors are used a lot. On the ones we had at work, the insulation is actually heat shrink tubing, thicker than regular heat shrink. Also, they are color coded, yellow for 10 ga. wire, blue for 16 ga. and red for 22 ga. wire. If done properly it is a very good fix. They are for basic component wiring, when you get into twisted pair, forget it, you change the wires.

- hairy

You are absolutely right on the color coding and heat shrink. I happened to be out of those when I did this video. I need to restock my electrical bins… I do have a lot of the heat shrink crimp bullet connectors though, both Male and Female for 12 – 14 ga.They are what I use on my off road lights.

-- Please like and subscribe to my YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/c/daves-workshop

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