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Dave Talks #12: Structured wiring mount board removed!? Drywall work, and details.

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Blog entry by dbhost posted 10-19-2016 03:10 PM 1551 reads 0 times favorited 18 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 11: Prepping the mount board for the structured wiring. Part 3. Drywall. Part 12 of Dave Talks series no next part

No video this time, but just a progress report. The screws for the rack were backed off so the rack could be removed, then the mount board was taken off last night. Time to get it back into the shop tonight so I can lay down the final coat of paint on it and let it cure.

I sized up a patch for the original sheet rock hole last night, took a bit of trimming and shaving, but it’s done.

Next steps are to remove the furnishings / fixtures in the room, patch the drywall, texture, and paint.

Mind you, this is all part of a remodel project that will give me a dedicated home office / studio space that won’t be subject to the noises of the air conditioner that the current office / studio suffers from.

Once the paint is done, I re mount the board, I am planning on using nails through the board to find the screw holes to insure I am going into the right spots, and then mount it up tight.

I have an articulating mic arm that I use for vocal work, but I am considering just using floor standing boom stands, or maybe a desktop tripod stand that can go away out of my way when not in use. This space is going to be a bit smaller than the old office / studio, and I want the space as efficient as possible…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com, YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCoa-AgyeFWqnQfGIJwdzkog



18 comments so far

View Dwain's profile

Dwain

463 posts in 3672 days


#1 posted 10-19-2016 05:20 PM

What does this have to do with woodworking?

-- When you earnestly believe you can compensate for a lack of skill by doubling your efforts, there is no end to what you CAN'T do

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

4386 posts in 2017 days


#2 posted 10-19-2016 10:19 PM

Busted !!

You should have added videos, pictures so everybody knows what is going on!!

-- Regards Robert

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

4128 posts in 2977 days


#3 posted 10-20-2016 01:17 AM

There is nothing easy about combining woodworking, hardware, wiring, and dry wall work. I have done it a number of times, more or less successfully. The woodwork is the easy part. the hardware dictates everything and is never arranged quite right. The wiring is never where it is supposed to be, and the drywall will crumble at the slightest provocation…and then a stud appears where you don’t want it, and it is never where you really want it.

In this house, the vacation house, the closest thing to this sort of thing, in recent memory is my little stand I made for the internet stack and security system…in our bedroom, of all places. Blinking lights where you don’t want them, you know the drill. It replaced an insanely crazy, put it together quick thing.

The stand and what it replaced, is well documented here, for all to see:

Internet Stack

That documentary should be read with care and intensity. It illustrates a number of important axioms about practicality, and marriage…(-:

That little stand is now relegated to holding sandpaper in the shop, and it works well for that. It has been replaced by a centralized system with our remodel this Spring. Since I post-facto, made a wooden construct for some of the hardware, I have put my imprint on that system as well.

Here is a picture of the wall in a central stairwell closet. At the lower left is a board with a lot of equipment that was on the floor. In the distance, a vertically mounted security camera video recorder. So two pieces of woodworking there:

So, understand a little about what you are doing, and how much trouble it really is to make it work.

Have a good one. Looking forward to the final product.

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5686 posts in 3045 days


#4 posted 10-20-2016 03:26 PM

Thanks Jim,

Yeah I don’t expect folks to quite get the woodworking aspect of this whole deal. This is about far more than just moving structured wiring. I ma doing a full office / studio move / remodel with a bunch of wood fixtures that need to be custom built for this application. So please be paitent with the steps and stay tuned!

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com, YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCoa-AgyeFWqnQfGIJwdzkog

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

4128 posts in 2977 days


#5 posted 10-20-2016 05:25 PM

I do understand you are into a monster project, relatively speaking. My projects here were approaching the trivial, but still involve some woodworking. I don’t think I have ever gotten into the mess you are into…(-:

Have a good one. Finishing up a small wine bottle rack, hopefully will have it done by tomorrow.

Later…

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5686 posts in 3045 days


#6 posted 10-21-2016 01:53 PM

Well, once this wall / structured wiring part is done, I start work on a desktop charger organizer. I have chargers for my cameras, my gimbal, audio recorders, phones etc… Cables everywhere etc…

To answer the question that Dwain asked. I admit the relationship is slim, but there are folks here that seem to have an interest, in this subject. There is woodworking related to this whole thing, but it is far from all woodworking, or even majority woodworking.

This woodworking in this office project is / will be…

#1. The Mount board, trimmed out, etc… for the structured wiring. #2. The mount boards trimmed out etc… for the guitar hangers. #3. The desktop chargin station / organizer mentioned above. #4. Conversion of a pair of matching 2 drawer plywood and oak filing cabinets, into a single 4 drawer filing cabinet for in the closet. #5. Not accurately reflected in the Sketchup, but floor to ceiling shelves on the right side of the closet to allow stowage of parts, office supplies, etc… #6. Light box “Recording” light for the door. I have the Recording acrylic in place already, just need to finish up the box and electrical work on it. Will be battery operated and mounted to the outside of the door.

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com, YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCoa-AgyeFWqnQfGIJwdzkog

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

4128 posts in 2977 days


#7 posted 10-21-2016 09:31 PM

Being able to make things quickly and “fit to purpose” in your own shop, and that almost always involves some wood, is a real asset in my experience. I have many things in both house that speak to my ability to fix, maintain, and create using the shops I have.

The first time I had any kind of shop was in 1970 when I bought my RAS. When I grew up, we had a basement where I could do things, but we had very few tools.

I remember when I was an intern (meaning very poor) in 1967, my wife and I made furniture out of decorative cement blocks, and some boards. I made a round end table, supported by cement blocks, out of wood, cut into a circle with a keyhole saw, and then painted. Also, we had the traditional board and cement block book shelf. For a stereo cabinet we bought some old canning shelves ($10) and added some cheap lattice work panels as doors for a couple of shelves with the electronics, attached with piano hinge. All the wood objects were painted and antiqued to fit the little apartment we were in. Our apartment became a social hub for a bunch of single male interns, mostly because we had decorated it and outfitted it with used (we didn’t buy anything new) and made items. But they looked good, and functioned well, so everyone loved to be there. The door was usually unlocked, and they barged in without knocking as though we were a family…and I guess we were.

One of the toughest years of a medical career became one of my best.

As an aside, my stereo system when I was an intern, consisted of a stereo FM tuner and stereo amplifier made from Dynakit tube kits while I was a medical student. An AR turntable and AR-4 speakers were the rest of the system. We thought it sounded great, and it was cheap. Actually, all the components were well reviewed and good values.

Well, so much for history. Off to Anchorage tomorrow where they have…........snow.

Later…

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5686 posts in 3045 days


#8 posted 11-01-2016 01:13 AM

What a nasty busy week. Double shifts, broken thermostat, found out my system is a 4 wire and modern thermostats are 5 wire. So now I have a high dollar thermostat and no way to isntall it, as well as plenty of wire to hook it up and no clue where the C wire lug on my unit is. I think I am going to have to call an electrician…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com, YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCoa-AgyeFWqnQfGIJwdzkog

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

4128 posts in 2977 days


#9 posted 11-01-2016 03:01 PM

I have hooked up a few thermostats in my day, but I don’t remember much about the wiring. The last one I hooked up I had to go look inside the furnace to figure out what went where. That was just a couple years ago in La Conner. You might take a look at your furnace and/or look the problem up on line. You may be able to leave one wire not attached, or two of them going to the same place. Seems to me I had a similar problem.

Most of the snow has melted here, and we are staying above freezing much of the time. Trying to design a dust collection solution for a drill press table, so that it is out of my way, and still does the job. That means it has to be above the table but adjustable. The table does have DC under the table at the center point, but that is not terribly useful except to push wayward chips into it after you have removed the workpiece.

Later

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5686 posts in 3045 days


#10 posted 11-01-2016 03:36 PM

The house was built in 1984, and I am trying to convert to smart / WiFi enabled devices, such as thermostats, outlets, lighting etc…

I need a 24v power supply for the WiFi / digital portion of the Thermostat. I have had the side of the unit off, and can see where the connections are, but I haven’t been able to get enough light up there to see…

I will be heading upstairs with a flashlight later this week to determine where that C connector is, but for now, I HAD to get a working thermostat on the wall and hooked up…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com, YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCoa-AgyeFWqnQfGIJwdzkog

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

4128 posts in 2977 days


#11 posted 11-02-2016 01:32 AM

Thermostats are essential devices, so you have to do what you have to do. Been there, many times. My house in La Conner is a forced air system. One thermostat. Adequate. No extremes in temperature.

My house in Anchorage has extremes of temperature. It is a hot water baseboard system. There are six zones. Set up with some major remodels in the last 10 years. And they are set very differently. But it is a larger home. Each zone has been carefully considered, and if you look at the thermostats, they are all set different. Totally different problem. And handled with many zones.

So I dealt with a lot of thermostats over the years, but haven’t done any work on them recently, except in La Conner.

An arcane world, keep me appraised, I like to see what happens with the interface between old and new…because I am so old…(-:

Later…

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5686 posts in 3045 days


#12 posted 11-02-2016 02:34 AM

Lol… life is sucking shop time away, but i am producing a nice narration video of the San Jacinto monument inscriptions right now.

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com, YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCoa-AgyeFWqnQfGIJwdzkog

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5686 posts in 3045 days


#13 posted 11-05-2016 06:32 PM

On a non related note, to Jim, and anyone else interested, my latest video which is not woodworking related at all, but rather a historical tour of the San Jacinto Battleground Monument in Harris County Texas is up. If you are interested you can see it at https://youtu.be/o-RrWDHXBSs

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com, YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCoa-AgyeFWqnQfGIJwdzkog

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

4128 posts in 2977 days


#14 posted 11-06-2016 02:28 AM

Regarding the San Jacinto video:

Dave, I enjoyed your narration. It reviewed some history, and it is obviously important.

Your production, including the narration, music, and video were entrancing.

Good job!

History is not the easiest subject to make entertaining, but this worked well. I am not unusual, since history is not a focus of mine. But with a clear focus on the words chiseled on the monument, it came to life. Your video and narrative were on target at all times, and kept me interested…even the state and country listing of the background of the Texan partisans, and that is kinda like reading Genesis…(-:

Keep it up…

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5686 posts in 3045 days


#15 posted 11-06-2016 04:42 PM

Okay in that light…

The Mexican revolutions begat horrible dictartors, the horrible dictators begat poor treatment of the Texas colonists, the poor treatment of the Texas colonists begat the Texas revolution…

I couldn’t resist…

All scriptural / historical humor aside…. Thank you for the kind words. I am trying desperately to scrape the rust off of my college training. Even though I have tons of experience and training in I.T., I have multiple degrees, one of which is an AA in Art / Commercial Art. Even though I went on to Systems Engineering, I never lost the passion for art and video production. It helps keep me foused. It is also a big part of why I love woodworking. It is the whole creating stuff thing…

I have always loved history, even as a kid. Living in Texas, I am where a large amount North American history has taken place. This video, and several more like it that are in the pipe. (U.S.S. Texas, U.S.S. Cavala, Mission San Antonio De Valero (The Alamo)) these are great ways for me to get out of the house, get some MUCH needed excersize, see some great historical sites, and lets me work with creative expression.

It all boils down to that. Creative expression. It’s why I do woodworking, it’s why I play music, and it’s why I do the videography.

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com, YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCoa-AgyeFWqnQfGIJwdzkog

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