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Dave Talks #9: Prepping the mount board for the structured wiring.

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Blog entry by dbhost posted 10-05-2016 06:40 PM 1084 reads 0 times favorited 12 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 8: Space saving shop project redesign ideas. Part 9 of Dave Talks series Part 10: Prepping the mount board for structured wiring #2. »

https://youtu.be/GgjOIqRj0fA

You know I can’t have just a plain raw cut piece of wood as a structured wiring Mount board so with a little bit and I mean a very little bit of effort we prepped the board and are ready for paint.

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com



12 comments so far

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3962 posts in 2625 days


#1 posted 10-05-2016 10:12 PM

I recently used a cut off wheel on a Dremel to retrieve a broken bolt in a piece of wood. The bolt was 1/4”, so too small for my bolt extractor set. I just cut a slot in the top of bolt end and used a standard screwdriver to unscrew it. They are definitely handy items.

Here in La Conner right now. I am about to install some wood register covers for forced air in some holes in the kick-board on the new kitchen cabinets here. They were designed for floor mount to match wooden floors, so I have to put in a center piece in the hold so I can screw the covers to it.

64 degrees and sunny right now, beautiful day. My wife is in eastern Washington with a friend visiting relatives and attending a quilting class in Richland. They left from here by car yesterday.

Have a good one, watching for the results…...............

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

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dbhost

5604 posts in 2692 days


#2 posted 10-06-2016 02:57 AM

Yeah, I got the mount board up tonight. I need to do some drywall work, and I actually need one more cantilever shelf for the 8 port switches.

I am seriously considering making a plywood shelf to make this work, although stamped steel ones aren’t that expensive…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3962 posts in 2625 days


#3 posted 10-06-2016 03:48 PM

Got my register covers installed, no issues, at least so far.

I asked for the sub-contractors to centralize our electronics for this house in La Conner when we did the remodel this year. Since the central part of the house on the main floor was gutted, and the ceiling and walls exposed, it was the obvious time. There is a substantial crawl space under the floor, so that allowed under floor access. Actually, because of the granite hill contour that the house is situated on, the crawl space is to a large extent a standing height situation.

The wiring involved included the current Wi-Fi system, TV cable with multiple access points, and alarm system. A security camera system and multiple LAN points were added during the remodel. Then the TV cable hub, cable modem, Wi-Fi router, LAN hub, and all the centralized equipment for the camera system were placed in a closet off a stairway to the garage. It is central to the house, so perfectly located. The alarm equipment was already there

I organized some of the stuff. The recorder for the cameras I placed in a wooden bracket on the wall. They had wall mounted the Wi-Fi router already. The LAN cables were not connected, so purchased a switch and connected all the LAN points to it.

Two power strips, a power timer used for automatic resets, the cable modem, and the switch I surface mounted to a simple 16”x18” rectangle of plywood that I edged with pine, and finished with Watco. I screwed the plywood into the wall. Now everything is organized, screwed down securely on the wall, and out of the way. I used cable ties and screw secured cable ties extensively. Easy to work on, and takes up minimal room.

I suspect you are setting up something that is quite complicated and has to allow for frequent alterations, is that the case? My setup, obviously for a totally different purpose and requirements, is complex, but it will require little maintenance and alterations will be infrequent. Much of the wiring, including the LAN and camera wiring, is in a big 18”x15”x4” metal switch box, whatever you call those things. The alarm system is in another wall mounted similar size box.

That little closet looks pretty ordinary, and the usual junk is in there, until you look at that wall, and then it looks like something else entirely….....(-:

Later….......

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View GFactor's profile

GFactor

79 posts in 1060 days


#4 posted 10-07-2016 02:31 PM

Why did you install the Rack “Upside-Down”? The only normal reason would be to the reverse the direction the rack needs to swing. However, since it was not addressed in the video, had to ask. Also, why not a couple of washers to ensure the rack does not pop off those drywall screws? I have seen my fair share of items come loose when secured that way, especially swinging data racks.

Cheers

-- To Steal Ideas From One Person is Plagiarism; to Steal From Many is Research…

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dbhost

5604 posts in 2692 days


#5 posted 10-07-2016 03:56 PM



Why did you install the Rack “Upside-Down”? The only normal reason would be to the reverse the direction the rack needs to swing. However, since it was not addressed in the video, had to ask. Also, why not a couple of washers to ensure the rack does not pop off those drywall screws? I have seen my fair share of items come loose when secured that way, especially swinging data racks.

Cheers

- GFactor

The design is pretty straight forward. at least if you are into IT stuff that is…

Let me explain…

I am a systems engineer by trade, and I work with a lot of virtualization, clustering, cloud type stuff. To stay sharp for my day job I have a home office / study lab that I have a CentOS 7 cluster that has 2 nodes, an iSCSI OpenFiler box, and a Windows 7 A.V. processing workstation along with an HP all in one photosmart printer in a 4ft bakers rack style LAN rack. To the right of that will be the switch rack(s). I currently have a 7u in use in the present home office, but am finding it is too confining to work in when I am needing to make changes, so I opted to add a 4u switch rack tot he mix as well to give me a total of 11u. That will more than meet any need for me now, or in the future, I think…

The wall mount racks are not the swing away type. Just simple stamped steel U sections, with holes drilled and threaded in the right spots for the screws.

So from the top down, let me list what needs to be racked.

Top 1u gets a 10” deep cantilever shelf, on this is the cable modem, WiFi router, and USB NAS disk. The router also serves as a DLNA server.
Next 1u is for my TrendNet USB 8 port KVM, One cable runs to the desk, the other cables to the bakers rack. The desk cable gets plugged into / is rigged to be a docking station for our laptops.
Next 1u is my TrendNet 16 port rack mount gigabit ethernet switch. The house is wired with Category 6 cable, and this switch provides the services to it. I have approximately 20 network outlets through the house. My plan is to upgrade this to a 24 port switch. I would love 10GBaseT, but that is terribly expensive, and kind of a moot point considering the size of the network..
There is 1U open space to allow cables to run from the switch, to the back of the rack, and in turn down the wall and to the server rack and desk.
Next 1u down is a 24 port gigabit patch panel. TrendNet again.
The next 1u is another cantilevered shelf housing 2 TrendNet Desktop 8 port gigabit switches. One labelled A, the other Labelled B and configured as the A and B iSCSI fabric switches. This shelf also supports the 2 Obi100 VoIP adapters. I have 1 for voice, and 1 for fax.
The next 1u below that is a CyberPowerSystems CPS-1215RM Rack Mount PDU power strip. Due tot he configuration of the outlets, and the nature of the transformers, I had to use short jumpers, literally 6” extension cords, to make the connections. That uses up the 7u.

Add on to the new 4u rack…
First 1u on the new rack will be a third cantilevered shelf to simply support all those transformers, I will fab up a face plate / block plate to clean this up at some point.

LONG TERM goal..

#1. Replace 16 port switch with 24 pot switch. #2. Obtain second 16 port switch for iSCSI fabric.This would remove the shelf for the switches / VoIP adapters, but would consume 1 u not currently in use. #3. Add in a CyberPower OR700LCDRM1U 700 VA 1u Rack mountable Uninterruptable Power Supply.

So the mount board method was selected for a couple of reasons.

#1. There are items that simply are not rack mountable, but need to be held close to a rack. #2. The screw / mount holes for the rack aren’t spaced correctly to catch the studs. The mount board is set up to catch the studs. In my next video you will see, I have this run in with 4, 2.5” long wood screws directly into the wall studs.

From the back to front, bottom up, long term, the layout is going to be…

#1. 4u Monoprice 19” 12” deep wall mount switch rack. Immediately above this… #2. 7u Monoprice 19” 12” deep wall mount switch rack. These two will be attached with mending plates and small machine screws / nuts to form one 11u wall mount switch rack. #3. Bottom 1u, The UPS. This is nearly 10” deep itself and will act as a shelf for the transformers to rest on. #4. Next 1u up, the PDU. #5. Next 1u up the first of the 16 port rack mount switches. Labelled B. #6. Next 1u up, open space to allow cables to pass through. The iSCSI fabric cables from both switches will pass through to the back of the rack at this point. FWIW, I will be making “Cable separators” out of maple to organize the cables as they pass through the rack. Keeping the jumble to a minimum. #7. Next 1u up, the first on the 7u rack, is the second 16 port switch. (TEG-S16DG, no need for managed switch in this environment).
(Cables are color coded on the anti snag boots, White for fabric A, Green for Fabric B etc… #8. Next 1u up is open space to allow for air flow. #9. Next 1u up the TrendNet 24 port gigabit patch panel. #9. Next 1u up and we just passed the capacity of the 7u rack, is the TrendNet 24 port gigabit ethernet switch. (TEG-S24DG) #10. Next 1u up is the TrendNet 8 port USB KVM.(TK-803R). #11. Next 1u up is the cantilever shelf with the cable modem, WiFi router, and NAS disk. #12. On the mount board above the rack, to the left will be the first Obi100 (Voice), then in the middle will be the telephone hub (110 punch down block). and lastly to the right is going to be the second Obi100 (fax) VoIP adapter.

The Voice VoIP adapter will be cabled straight to the distribution block. And the legacy telephone cable will be replaced with color coded Category 5e cable. (My cat 6 is blue, the Cat 5e is gray).

This, if I wasn’t super clear on it, is part of a major remodel / move of the home office / studio remodel project that includes not just this network move, but some cheap furniture assembly as well as mount boards for guitar hangers, but some actual real woodworking of sorts. I need to configure an add on to the desk to support my VCR / DVD player (For video encoding activities), as well as a 12 port audio mixer.

I have a pair of 2 drawer filing cabinets I want to keep. I will be modding them to make them a single vertical 4 drawer once I start moving the files into the one existing 4 drawer…

And one of the mount boards used for the guitars. FWIW, for the most part they are inexpensive instruments.

The overall idea of what I am trying to do…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3962 posts in 2625 days


#6 posted 10-08-2016 12:16 AM

Knowing what you do for a living, of course, I didn’t question what you were doing. The only thing that made sense to me from the exchange with Gfactor was that you used a board to capture the studs, so that you can put random items on it. That’s what I did for my simple situation. I knew your situation would be much more complicated.

I know enough to make connections to a switch, and into the router. Other than that, those black boxes are black boxes. Are you still using mostly Linux? I think that is what you were using.

Designing a small 12 bottle wine rack on SketchUp, to fit in an adjustable book shelf unit at the end of an island in the kitchen here. Not much else going on today. Kinda quiet.

Did some computer housekeeping on this 8 year old portable that serves as the main computer here in La Conner, and lives here full time as a desktop replacement. It is an HP Pavilion Entertainment PC, technically. I liked the keyboard, and the options. So I bought it on line from the HP site and basically maxed it out. It still functions well. Has a separate video 512 meg video card, 4 gig of memory, 64 bit Windows 10 Pro operating system, a 2.6 gig Core Duo processor, two hard discs, and a 1680×1050 17” screen. The only problem I have with it, is the inability to update the Wi-Fi driver, causing occasional hiccups. But when we remodeled and put in LAN wiring, it enabled me to just plug it into the wall and forget about Wi-Fi. So it chugs along quite well.

Inevitably, I will have to replace it, and I will get an all-in-one due to the form factor. The computer sits in a common area next to the kitchen, so have to minimize the hardware. I know you deal with domestic issues, as well…......(-:

Beautiful day here today. Yesterday was rainy and windy, so much so that I couldn’t barbecue as I planned. But today is different. Currently 60 deg and was clear until an hour ago.

Have a good evening…..........

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

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Jim Bertelson

3962 posts in 2625 days


#7 posted 10-08-2016 12:17 AM

Oh, and like your SketchUp diagram…............

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5604 posts in 2692 days


#8 posted 10-08-2016 02:43 AM

Yes, I still make my living with linux. And Windows, and Solaris, and Android, and a little bit of Mac, and iOS…

Funny thing. I never wanted to go into IT. I wanted to be an engineer but Calculus convinced me otherwise…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

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dbhost

5604 posts in 2692 days


#9 posted 10-08-2016 03:03 AM

Your comments RE: the old HP portable made me giggle BTW… I have a 13 year old Biostar iDeq, basically a 2.2ghz single core 64 bit system with memory maxed out at 2GB, I had it running 64 bit Windows XP until Microsoft ended support for it. Not worth trying to get even Windows 7 working on it… So it runs a pretty stripped down appliance / storage version of Linux, I use it as the controller for my iSCSI SAN. Honestly hardware specs wise, my smart phone smokes this thing…

Very long winded story short. Let me explain the why at least of what I am doing…

#1. I have streaming media throughout the house, and no matter how much I futz with it, I am never 100% happy with wireless yet… #2. I am running a training lab in my house to keep my up to speed with the tech I use at work. This will help contain the sprawl. #3. Aside from IT, I do some audio engineering / recording work on the side, I need a space to do this.

If I weren’t doing the extended stuff, just the steaming media and not doing the iSCSI, KVM etc… stuff, I could fit it all in a regular Structured wiring cabinet. A standard 28” cabinet, which would mounte recessed into the wall cavity between the studs, would more than do the trick.

You see, all the wiring for telecom, network, video, and security comes to one central point, kind of the same way your power comes from a breaker box, making it much more manageable. However the scale of what I am doing is too big…

Again, down sized and the modem, router, 16 port switch, VoIP adapters (Voice over Internet Protocol) and telephone distribution hub, along with a structured wiring power distribution unit would fit, along with a coax splitter, and all the cables etc… with no problem.

Huh…

I bet your are glazing over at this like I do when my doctor tries to explain medical stuff… Now I get it!

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3962 posts in 2625 days


#10 posted 10-08-2016 03:47 PM

I understand the macro stuff, meaning the general terms like VoIP, telephone, telecom, video, security, etc. But when you get into iSCSI, KVM, etc…........then I lose track. We don’t even have a land line here, only cell phones. At Anchorage, we have both, with a wireless six handset system being the main workhorse, but including a few dumb phones in case the power goes out, important for my job before I retired. Our phone in Anchorage, by the way, now comes in over the video cable, and the electronics for it has a battery back up.

Interestingly, I too started out to be an electrical engineer, majoring in physics, but actually stronger in math. I made some money correcting calculus papers, and they put me over all the correction people, including upper classmen math majors. I asked why, and they said I was the only one who could get the answers to all the problems correctly….....(-:

Now I don’t even remember what calculus is…..........(-:

I switched to pre-med early in my sophomore year for personal reasons, and not much too say after that….......except I am glad to be done with my 50 years in a high stress pressure cooker….....medicine takes over your life. A good life, and a rewarding life, but a tough life.

Your old computer reminds me of the series of computers I owned starting in the late 70’s with a Commodore Pet. That’s when I started programming. I built computers along the way, but mostly purchased them. I got an IBM XT with the gigantic 10 meg hard drive in 1983, and we ran the fiscal part of my practice with it for 6 months when I first moved to Anchorage. We were awaiting a building to be finished to house our clinic startup. We came out of the blocks fully computerized for the fiscal end, and at this time that clinic has multiple providers, and 45 employees. I designed the business model.

By the way, in my experience, both Windows 8 and 10 seem to run faster than Win XP or Win 7. So the newer operating systems have kept this old computer running a couple of extra years, I am thinking.

Speaking of programming, yesterday I put a utility on this computer that I had made way back when, but somehow forgot to document the command line syntax. I guess I just used the examples I had at home, so just copied the shortcut when needed. Source code takes up little space, so I tend to put all my old source code on all of my important computers. So I was looking at my old code from 2004, and puzzled it out. Just a simple, but very handy thing that will run a program and place it and size it according to the command line parameters. Mostly used for two side by side copies of windows file explorer. With Windows 10, you can snap two windows into the same configuration but it takes a lot more keystrokes. I just click on two icons in the quick access tool bar and there it is.

Well, off to doing some stuff in the shop…......have a good one…......

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

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dbhost

5604 posts in 2692 days


#11 posted 10-10-2016 01:03 AM

LOL…

Well, I won’t bore you with the infrastructure mumbo jumbo. Just to say that it makes perfect sense to me…

I actually pursued and obtained a communications degree that spun off into an IT career as oddly enough, they are related more than you’d think… I am in the prrocess of getting back into school for a masters degree in MIS here shortly.

I have had just under a 20 year run so far in I.T., and I feel somewhat stuck where I am at. To get to the next phase of my career I either need a more advanced degree, or somebody has to die… And I’d rather not have friends and colleagues die on me…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3962 posts in 2625 days


#12 posted 10-10-2016 01:21 AM

Another degree always looks good on the resume. And they sometimes are the tipping point to getting a new job.

OK, off to making dinner. Sherie gets back tomorrow from a 6 day jaunt in Eastern Washington doing quilting stuff and visiting relatives….........

Later….........

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

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