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Dave Talks #5: Dave builds and installs a Shop Vac shelf.

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Blog entry by dbhost posted 07-26-2016 02:15 AM 1284 reads 0 times favorited 6 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 4: Shop cleanup. Solo folding a giant drop cloth... Part 5 of Dave Talks series Part 6: Shop organization products. Wonder Winders. »

https://youtu.be/iDz9S17_GD0

A very basic simple solution to a pretty interesting problem.

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com



6 comments so far

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3963 posts in 2627 days


#1 posted 07-26-2016 02:52 PM

I put up a couple of corner shelves similar to yours in the garage in La Conner, except that I made them triangular since they hold smaller objects, the speakers for my shop audio system. Same problem, the corners weren’t square. Being suspicious, I actually measured the angle first, and then built the shelves to fit that angle. The corners were off just a couple of degrees as I recall. In La Conner I had to use new materials, because I haven’t generated much scrap there yet. Here in Anchorage, scrap materials would have been used, just like you did.

Listening, I would guess you are using a drill rather than an impact driver. It is also corded I noticed. I have one corded drill left, a Skil, 35 years old. I do not think it will ever die, but I don’t use it much anymore. As long as the cords don’t bother you, corded still gives more bang for the buck.

Off topic, but just a fun observation. I bought an inexpensive Yamaha receiver and two inexpensive Sony speakers for that garage system. When I first hooked it up, it really didn’t sound very good. Then I did the automatic equalization using the microphone that came with the receiver. Gad zooks, what a difference. That is the biggest change I have heard with equalization, although my kitchen/dining room system improved considerably as well. With the garage system, I think the cheaper speakers benefited more than more expensive ones might. Nowadays, you can buy cheaper speakers and still get pretty good sound with the automatic equalization process. In the case of the kitchen system, I had better speakers, but a very odd positioning, and the equalization probably compensated for the position problems.

Still puttering around with my drill press table. Hopefully will get more done today….......

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

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dbhost

5604 posts in 2694 days


#2 posted 07-26-2016 03:40 PM

LOL, yes I am using a corded drill. I own a cordless, but for the most part, don’t trust it, particularly to drive large screws. I know I’m funny that way.

Yamaha makes some fanstastic audio equipment. Generally speaking it is out of my price range, I sure wouldn’t consider putting any Yamaha gear in my shop! Heck, I’ve got a pair of Harbinger powered PA speakers I use with the band when we play, and I wouldn’t put them in the shop!

I have been contemplating that shelf literally for years, and just decided it was time. That shop vac has been under foot for too long. The hooks in the ceiling need to go though. I barely squeezed the vac in around them.

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3963 posts in 2627 days


#3 posted 07-26-2016 04:24 PM

Yamaha has a large range of price and quality. Back in 1991, we installed a Yamaha surround system in our recreation room. It had separate components for features that are now routinely included in even cheap receivers. It was an expensive system.

I have had numerous brands of hi-fi equipment, but recently I have gone back to Yamaha, and Denon. So far none of their stuff has failed. The Yamaha in the La Conner garage is the cheapest model in the Rx line. I have a slightly more powerful one in my Anchorage den, and a better one yet in the kitchen/dining room. None of these is of audiophile grade, just solid modestly priced items.

I have a low level audiophile system in the living room in the process of being upgraded. I have an ancient Pioneer receiver there, and an old, but good, analog TV. I am saving up for a new TV, and then I will install a different receiver as well. Basically, you can’t drive the digital TV’s well with the old AV receivers, and you can’t drive an analog TV well with the new AV receivers. The TV and receiver have to be replaced simultaneously.

Getting stuff off the floor does wonders for the efficiency of small spaces. I have little open space in my shop. For instance, in order to assemble my drill press table, I needed some space to apply a uniform heavy weight (the granite cut-out for our large kitchen sink) to keep the multi-layered construction flat. I took down one of my fold up utility tables to make room for my knock down assembly table. It can handle the heavy weight and is dead flat. I have to make items mobile, fold-up, or knock down because of the space limits. And I use all my wall space for storage cabinets or peg board.

Down to the shop….........

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

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dbhost

5604 posts in 2694 days


#4 posted 07-26-2016 05:15 PM

FWIW, the powered PA speakers I have, and use for band use are the Harbinger V2112. Not anything that gets a lot of love, but they sound “good enough” for a country / blues band that plays mostly in barns and flat bed trailers improvised as a stage.

http://www.musiciansfriend.com/pro-audio/harbinger-vari-v2112-600-w-12-two-way-powered-loudspeaker

The Yamaha speakers I want, but just can’t justify are actually mid priced units. The Yamaha DBR12.
http://www.musiciansfriend.com/pro-audio/yamaha-dbr12-powered-speaker

The problem is, I am the only one in our band that has a decent enough paying job, and we don’t gig enough to justify spending a lot of money on really good speakers. We tend to play small venues of less than 250 people, mostly private parties, and the PA is only for vocals. I have a really good bass amp, the lead guitarist has a decent guitar amp, the rhythm guitarist uses my 60 watt Behringer combo guitar amp which does well enough, but certainly nothing to brag about. (He wants to sound better, he needs to pony up for a better amp!), and the drummer. I want to stuff socks in his kick drum most of the time as he is clueless on volume anyway.

For what it’s worth, the gear snobs will bash the Harbinger. It’s a Musicians Friend / Guitar Center low end house brand, but it carries the vocals we need perfectly, and buffer music no problem at all. I don’t think they’d put up with carrying a night club with techno all night long for very long, but for what we do, and are capable of, they are more than good enough.

Floor space is the point of the project after all. Like I mention in the video. I am planning on moving the trash can separator onto another shelf just to get it off the floor. Kind of a complex rig, but it works for me!

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3963 posts in 2627 days


#5 posted 07-26-2016 07:37 PM

I would think that speakers for bands are into volume more than flat reproduction. Of course, distortion needs to be kept to a minimum no matter what a speaker is used for. But, I am guessing, that the changing acoustics from the different spaces you play in adds more issues than a lower quality speaker. If voice sounds OK, your probably good to go, and it may not be worthwhile to upgrade, unless you can detect the difference.

My living room system uses a self powered subwoofer with 400 watts. The main speakers are driven by a power amplifier that puts out 350 watts per channel, sits on the floor behind the TV, and weighs a ton. Nothing I have mentioned is cheap. It is smooth sound, loud sound if you want it, and the power amp definitely improves the sound over having the receiver drive them. Its all old stuff, functions well, and I will probably never replace it.

There is never enough space in a shop, and it is hard to keep other things from encroaching on that space.

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

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dbhost

5604 posts in 2694 days


#6 posted 07-26-2016 08:15 PM

Other than if we decide to put everything into the PA we could REALLY use a subwoofer, no real good reason to upgrade.

If we played in a controlled space where we could actually engineer the audio solution, well, we’d be in a different league than just a group of middle aged guys playing for beer every now and then!

I have other stuff coming on the shop space saving frontier, but budget and my back are holding me back. I was making REALLY good headway and, well 4 steps forward, and one back. So I am still 3 steps ahead at least!

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

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